Casting help

#1
So as I work on my casting there is a problem I can't seem to solve. It happens with frequency. Basically it is this.. as I am working my cast I go back, then come forward in a nice tight loop, however as the tip of my line flies forward it begins to drop just below the line it is passing over, then as it hits the point it begins to straighten it catches (either hook or line) on the line it is passing over because it has dropped below that line and is now pulled above it by the loop unwinding at the end. This sometimes results in losing momentum and dropping earlier, or even hooking onto the line.

I can't figure out how I keep that tip from dropping below the line.
 
#2
It is called a tailing loop.
The simple explanation is that the line will follow the same path as the rod tip. The rod tip is not staying parallel to the ground during your forward stroke.
The diagnosis of the cause is not as simple however.
Typically it is caused by too much acceleration on the forward cast. The power causes the rod to flex more and lowers the rod below a straight line path. The key is a smooth steady acceleration throughout the forward cast not a jerk.
Try this: cast only 30-35 feet of line in a normal (for you) manner. Then cut your energy used in half. If the line lays out straight, lower energy until the line piles up in front of you.
This will demonstrate HOW LITTLE energy is needed to cast well. Let the rod do the job it is designed for.
I use this little lesson often to correct tailing loop issues it has worked for many people.
jesse
 
#3
This makes sense. I will try your correction method. It would not surprise me to find I put too much power. It is hard to let the rod do the work.
 

jwg

Active Member
#4
It is called a tailing loop.
The simple explanation is that the line will follow the same path as the rod tip. The rod tip is not staying parallel to the ground during your forward stroke.
The diagnosis of the cause is not as simple however.
Typically it is caused by too much acceleration on the forward cast. The power causes the rod to flex more and lowers the rod below a straight line path. The key is a smooth steady acceleration throughout the forward cast not a jerk.
Try this: cast only 30-35 feet of line in a normal (for you) manner. Then cut your energy used in half. If the line lays out straight, lower energy until the line piles up in front of you.
This will demonstrate HOW LITTLE energy is needed to cast well. Let the rod do the job it is designed for.
I use this little lesson often to correct tailing loop issues it has worked for many people.
jesse

I was comparison casting some rods a few weeks ago, and noticed I was more prone to tailing loops on the softer slower rods. Is this expected?

I agree about reducing the effort to cast. This is the one rule of casting that I can actually remember and use successfully when I am out fishing and need to improve - make the cast with as little effort as possible.

Also helps to make sure I am casting above me, to avoid the tailing loop, and not a lazy slightly-off-to-the-side cast that happens to permit the tailing loop to unwind without tangling, and thus enables bad casting form.

Jay
 
#5
Slower action rods require a little different technique. Longer pause at the back of your cast and a smoother acceleration on the forecast. When comparing rods you must really concentrate on your technique for each rod. A decent caster can cast very different rods well, however I have found that most people have a "natural bent" toward slow, medium or fast and it helps to know which category you fit in.
jesse
 

Derek Young

Emerging Rivers Guide Services
#6
Watch the position and elevation of your casting hand, the one holding the rod. Does your hand drop in elevation from it's stopped position on the back cast, to it's final position on the forward?
 
#8
I am thinking my problem is two fold.. first I need to slow down my acceleration and second work on straightening out my rod tip path.
 

Richard E

Active Member
#10
So as I work on my casting there is a problem I can't seem to solve.
Some sound advice dispensed so far. Search for tailing loops in this site's aechives for more info.

Casting is a huge part of fly fishing. Where are you located? I strongly advocate getting a casting lesson or three - cheap way to get yourself quicly up the learning curve, and not teach yourself bad habits. Go to the Federation of Fly Fishers website and look for a certifies instructor in your area.
 
#11
Yeah I think I am going for a class. I am in portland, so I will try to find one here, but I am pretty sure my biggest problem is my back cast. I have been watching it and it is terrible. For some reason nothing I do forward seems to translate back... I need to redo how I back cast.