1200GS for fishing vehicle?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by yo_eddy, Mar 25, 2007.

  1. yo_eddy

    yo_eddy New Member

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    I'm trying to combine two hobbies, fishing and motorcycles by getting a dualsport. I'm thinking of a 1200GS or GSA. I'm guessing the majority of the offroading I'd do would be on fireroad, but you never know; if I think there are fish down a trail, I'm probably pointing the bike down it.

    Anyone use a GS or GSA for getting to your favorite spots? If so, how does it do on your average fireroad? How does it do on something a bit more rought than a fireroad? I'm also looking at the KTM 950/990. I need to test ride both, but I like the looks of the BMW better. Thanks for any input
     
  2. Chris Scoones

    Chris Scoones Administrator Staff Member

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    Yo Eddy,

    I got a bit of background on this one having spent a lot of time in the saddle of my 1100GS. (over 17K miles in a year, much less lately) It was bought and used for the purpose you described, as well as a daily commuter until I started working out of the house. It's had a few fishing trips to MT, ID, OR and of course all over WA.

    The GS shines when you put quite of a bit of distance on the highway, although I consider it quite boring having spent much of my life on much faster bikes. The 1200 is stepped up over mine adding 20+ HP & dropping a very noteable 70lbs (I think that's correct) which improves the borish ride considerably which should do for most.

    Off road my 600lb pig should be teased and called names, but oddly It does slide well / consistantly on the fireroads. If, though, it's out of shape bad you better be on your game. If you're in the muck, forget it. Pick that bike up a few times in an hour and you start humming KTM.

    Personally, I wouldn't get another GS unless I could affoard the GS Adventure, but the 20K tag is just BS. The tags on the KTM's I've been pricing out over the last week are shocking themselves. Maybe it's just been too long since I've bought a new bike, whatever. The next bike will likely be a slightly used 525 built out with some enduro mods and taken with truck on long distance trips. The problem with those is that the HW will kill them pretty quick, but given I've got my girls riding now dad needs something I can stay up with them with and that'll have to do.

    Tires. What you need to consider is how you intend to use it. Not often, and purposely for fireroads and such for fishing, and you can get away with a semi-agressive TK80 tyre that'll help off road. Still, it's no knobby, but it's okay. If, though, you're on the street much like I was / am, I just love my Tourance's. Very good in the wet, good on the dry and then I just put up with them on fire roads. They wear pretty good too. Your best bet is to get a spare set of wheels, have each type of tire and switch them out on your own as needed.

    Consider your location if you go BMW. Not a lot of service centers outside Seattle / Tacoma.

    There's a tidbit for ya.

    Chris
     
  3. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    I'm hoping that my next flyflshing vehicle is an ATV 4x4. Thats all they drive over here. I mean you get up in the woods and all you see are them. Very few bikes used for off roading here in Montana. Here they are Street legal, the ATV's that is.

    But nothing is cheap here as a good one starts out at about $5000.00 or more.

    Jim
     
  4. Mike T

    Mike T Active Member

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    I was in Ketchum last September fishing and a group of riders from back east were also there with their BMW's. I'd always wanted one but either never had the money (when I was younger) or didn't want to spend the money. But the thought of combining fishing and a motorcycle proved to be too much to resist. Last November ended up buying a 1200GS which has a full set of hard cases so that I may go fishing. The GS is an absolutely great bike and while I haven't been able to take it fishing yet as soon as the weather clears that will change.

    There's a thread about this over at advrider.com, http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=215233. You'll also find reports of rides to St. Joes, Lolo Pass, etc. A fellow who posts there, "The Rev" sells bikes at South Sound BMW and himself is taking his 1150GS down to Oregon next month to fish. PM me if you'd like his contact info, he's a great resource and a good guy.
     
  5. E.L. Fullerton

    E.L. Fullerton New Member

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    Keep your eyes open for used GS bikes, even going back to the "airhead" bikes. The PD(Paris Dakar) version has a 9.25 gal tank, and you can work on them with basic tools. I rode one to Guatemala and back with the only problem being a flat tire. There is an active Airhead club in the Seattle area. The 1150 gs should be readily available. I like the kickstand and gas tank better than on the 1200. I'm a short legged fellow and being able to ride off of the kickstand when at full expedition load is a real benefit. good luck in your hunt, you'll enjoy the bike...........Papa
     
  6. TheShadKing

    TheShadKing Will Fish For Food

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    I dunno. I have a Duc 900SS that's seen it's share of fire roads, some in fairly pathetic shape. The weak link is the tires, road tires just don't cut it when the ground's wet. It's in naked form, otherwise the bodywork would be an issue too.

    Of the bazillion people I know with big beemers, almost none of them ride very rutted fire roads. Gravel roads, no problemo, but if it starts looking like a trail, then nein.

    I'd go for the KTM, or if I was cheap, a KLR.


    Rolland
     
  7. Mike T

    Mike T Active Member

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    Shadking makes a fair point about riding a large GS on marginal terrain. There are certainly people who can do it very well and I'm not one of them. Having said that it's a skill to be developed just like any other. Where the GS will shine over a KTM or KLR is stability and comfort over long distances on pavement. Windy Montana on a heavier bike is a lot easier on you than a lighter bike. You just have to weigh the advantages of each against how you honestly feel you'll use the bike most.
     
  8. gt

    gt Active Member

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    i hung up my MC spurs 1yr ago. ducati's are the only way to travel! went from an M900 to my first ST4s and then traded for yet another ST4s. these bikes, as most things italalian are a perfect fit for twisted pavement, and that is after about 250,000 on beemers.

    many of the folks i rode with loved their GSes butt, they are not a very good off road choice. loaded you are looking at 700+ # and not very good manners. IF you are a true off road expert, you can get by with a beemer off road. if not, i would look again at the wonderful choices that are out there with off road service more in mind. KTM comes to mind as one i explored in depth.

    and after saying all of that, i never got the notion that packing my fishing stuff as well as my riding gear, you do wear full armour don't you?, would combine very well at all. just too much stuff to hang on too over the course of a day.
     
  9. TheShadKing

    TheShadKing Will Fish For Food

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    Sure, I ride with full armor, (aerostich, and this is _not_ an endorsement) but it doesn't take up any room in the luggage when I'm riding. :rofl: And with waders, heck if it starts raining I might wear them under the 'Stich, at least I know the waders will keep me dry. :p

    I need to get my kit a bit smaller so I can camp / fish on the bike; I've done the camping thing but not with fishing gear. The fishing gear doesn't add that much space, though, except for the boots, and it's about the only way I'll be able to afford to go to the Deschutes this year what with gas prices and everything.


    Rolland
     
  10. yo_eddy

    yo_eddy New Member

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    Thanks for all the input. I'm hoping the test rides will tell me which one is for me. I'm basically looking for a combo of the BMW and the KTM. Something good on the long haul, yet light enough to handle well on light off road. Since it doesn't appear to exist, I know I'll have to compromise somewhere, just can't figure out where yet. I've always wanted a BMW, so the KTM will probably have to shine to win out.

    No matter which one I get, I hope that those big ugly panniers will hold all my stuff. I do ride in full armour. Depends on which bike I'm on, but probably the Stich for dual sport. That should stuff small enough to put in a pannier. Once it gets nice out, I just wade in shorts and sandals. If I have too, I can strap the waders and shoes to the back.

    I've got the Ducati covered. I have an S4R for hitting the curvies. I've had that down a few dirt roads. You can get that sliding pretty well without too much effort on dirt. Maybe I should fit some knobbies to it.
     
  11. gt

    gt Active Member

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    so i assume you are talking about riding shears falls down to macs?? that road would be pretty easy on a GS. your biggest problem, as you probably already know, are the sharp rocks and your tires. the $tich proved its worth on the hwy for me, in fact i worn one out! in a dual sport mode, i would suggest you look for a different system of protection for yourself, but thats just an opinion and i am sure you have a good one as well :cool:
     

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