Your Favorite Chironomids?

#16
Sometimes you can separate the ASB from the clear plastic lining to get a thinner product - try stretching a corner.

Hi John, my friend Mike (Royal Coachman) has got some good chronie and lake info from you in the past.
 

IveofIone

Active Member
#17
John, thanks for raising the bar to another level for tying chironomids. Those are some stunning patterns-really presentation grade stuff. Many of us (most!) are not fishing patterns that look that good yet we still manage to catch fish. My hope is that more people will continue to share their patterns even though they might not be as elegant. We have yet to see contributions from Ediger and Ira and several others known to be excellent cronie fishermen.

My enthusiasm for tying shiny 'mids has been bumped up a notch from this thread, I'm grateful for that.

Ive
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#19
Oddly enough, for a die-hard stillwater flyfisher, I don't have a favorite midge emerger pattern. I carry flies in just about every style shown above and switch it up when fishing the critters. I've never found one specific style, color or size that constantly works to a point that I consider it my go-to midge emerger pattern.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#20
I've been a bit busy. I'll post a couple of patterns tomorrow, but honestly with over 2000 different species of midge species in the US it becomes an interesting proposition to narrow it down to a few. My preference changes year to year and trip to trip.
 

jwg

Active Member
#24
@IveofIone

Here are some patterns I fish
chironomid selections sm.jpg


Top center is my go to pupa pattern.
JBC: Jays Best Chironomid
white bead and peacock herl are pretty standard, beads are secured with a red thread butt section. The beads are gray glass with silver lining peaking through.

The chromie pattern below would probably be next. I am sure others tie it more elegant versions than I do. The one in the picture lacks a peacock herl thorax of Phil Rowleys published pattern, which he calls his number one chironomid. I would really like to hear about others tying techniques for chromie and what they think are the key features. This is one of the few cronies I tie with a dark bead and maybe its the shiny dark bead that is actually more critical than the silvery body.

the red thread chironomid on the lower left is always a good try when you need something smaller and may serve as a bloodworm as well. The bead is gold lined clear glass, and the wire is gold. Why gold lined glass bead, I don't know, my first ones were store bought and they worked. Then even when I tied them they still worked. The wisp of peacock herl is the most annoying part of the tie. The largest stillwater brown I have caught was on this pattern after not getting any love on the JBC. I knew there was a big fish around by the bulging subsurface rises, but had to change patterns to get it. Sadly, I did too have a camera that day, and there are no longer browns in those lakes.

The bead bloodworm in the top left, with red lined clear glass beads, works as well as any other bloodworm I have used. Not a hard sell on this one, but it has worked more consistently for me than other bloodworms I have tried. It seems big and clunky but I guess the red part is only the diameter of the inside of the bead, so maybe it appears thinner in the water than it looks in the air.

Rightmost pattern in the image is a friends tie for bigger chironomids, dark crystal flash wrap in an ice cream type pattern with addition of wing buds coming out.

I know I need olive patterns and smaller patterns, so I am playing close attention to this thread. The patterns I use tend toward red or black or grey or shiny. Sometimes I can't catch, and others are catching, and I overhear "olive", or small olive.

Chironomid pupa offer endless opportunity for experimenting at the vise and I have many other patterns but none have proven out like those above (at least not for me). But when out on the water, I may get stuck on patterns I know work, even when they are not working on a particular day, and hence have failed to learn other patterns that might be successful.

Suggestions from others are welcome on how to round out my selection.

Jay
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#26
@Buzzy

Looks like both the 2nd and 3rd flies are olive with red wire. Am I seeing this right?

Jay
Yes you are seeing them correctly - the 2nd fly has antistatic bag over olive thread with the bag strip secured with small red ultrawire. The 3rd fly has UV resin cured over the olive thread and red wire and a clear glass bead. I think there's enough difference to sometimes maybe, on occasion, make a difference, once in awhile, to a trout (how's that for bluster?).
P1010542.JPG
....six or seven years ago I was passing through Little Fort, BC and stopped at the fly shop there to get some flies and local intel; they had these skinny little bloodworms and I bought a few (and several '52 Buicks). The bloodworms worked really well so I tie them up now and often fish them in tandem with a little mayfly.....sorry @IveofIone if the mayfly is off topic a bit but these two are sometimes magic together (midge on bottom, of course).
 

jwg

Active Member
#27
Yes you are seeing them correctly - the 2nd fly has antistatic bag over olive thread with the bag strip secured with small red ultrawire. The 3rd fly has UV resin cured over the olive thread and red wire and a clear glass bead. I think there's enough difference to sometimes maybe, on occasion, make a difference, once in awhile, to a trout (how's that for bluster?). View attachment 131835 ....six or seven years ago I was passing through Little Fort, BC and stopped at the fly shop there to get some flies and local intel; they had these skinny little bloodworms and I bought a few (and several '52 Buicks). The bloodworms worked really well so I tie them up now and often fish them in tandem with a little mayfly.....sorry @IveofIone if the mayfly is off topic a bit but these two are sometimes magic together (midge on bottom, of course).
Ha ha. good on you for starting to talk about combos.

I was thinking I should post about a black microleech with red wire that is good to fish in combination with a chironomid pupa or bloodworm. I like your mayfly bloodworm combo idea.

jay
 
#28
Anybody have any observations about coatings? Thinking here in particular about Hard as Nails vs a UV resin. I have yet to do much in the way of purposeful comparing, but it's one of my goals this spring. The differences under UV light are pretty obvious, but I'm curious if anyone has noticed any fishing differences.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
#29
Anybody have any observations about coatings? Thinking here in particular about Hard as Nails vs a UV resin. I have yet to do much in the way of purposeful comparing, but it's one of my goals this spring. The differences under UV light are pretty obvious, but I'm curious if anyone has noticed any fishing differences.
I honestly don't think the UV resins compared to Hard as Nails makes much difference when the coatings are fresh. But I do think the UV resin is a bit tougher than old Hard as... maybe my Hard as Nails is defective, old, the wrong brand? But I have seen it disbond and discolor on occasion. One might say so what since a simple midge is easily replaced but I get superstitious when one fly is working really, really well. That said - I was fishing an Olive Dairy on Dairy and the trout were on that fly. By days end the coating was gone, the wire broken with a hint of it as a tag, the olive thread in tatters and the bead (this one was white) had hardly an paint left on it and I bent the hook back into shape a couple times (2X). I retired the fly that night.