5wt or 6wt?

#1
I am in the market for a new rod (stoked!). Currently have a 4 and a 6 and planned on replacing my 15 yr old 6 with another 6. But, have recently begun considering a 5wt instead. I fish exclusively for trout primarily on the Yakima & various eastside lakes.

Based on my needs would you recommend a 5wt or 6wt?

Thanks in advance for any input. :thumb:
 
#2
5wt or 6 wt?

Just go for a 6. It doesn't handle that much different than a 5. Plus it will give you a little more backbone in the wind, casting bigger flies or fighting bigger fish.

It can also be used for summer steel, pinks, bass, pike etc.
 

mike doughty

Honorary Member
#3
5wt or 6 wt?

Backyard said:
Just go for a 6. It doesn't handle that much different than a 5. Plus it will give you a little more backbone in the wind, casting bigger flies or fighting bigger fish.

It can also be used for summer steel, pinks, bass, pike etc.
Exactly!
 
#5
Backyard's on the money, especially if your 4 wgt is still in good shape. If I could only take one rod with me to any given water, it will be my 6 wgt. as my all rounder.

Half the time the wind is a factor that needs to be reckoned with. If I don't have my 6 wgt with me, at the least, my shoulder with be sore the next day from fighting the wind, and my casting will be frustrating instead of just challenging. I use it for summer steelie's, sea run cutts, resident coho's, pinks, and when the big trout are rising in strong current, its hard to turn a 20"+ trout's head when it decides to go down stream without a rod with some authority.
 

papafsh

Piscatorial predilection
#6
6wt..
I actually have 2 6wts one is slow the other fast. I prefer the slow one on the Yak with dry's.
I do think a 91/2 or 10 ft rod is better on the rivers I fish, especially when sub-surface fishing because they roll cast so well.
With a 4wt, 7wt, 2-8wt's & 9/10wt I still use the 6's most.
LB
 
#7
Whad're y'all crazy??! Buy both & don't tell your wife.

...One shouldn't burden himself with such difficult decesions

...when you come to a fork in the road, take it...

....who's for 5?...who's for 6?....alright, I'm with you fellers.
 
#8
A note of dissent. Get a light, fast 5 (I love my new Powell TiMax I picked up at the show). Overline it to a 6 for throwing from a boat on the Yak (especially big dries with a dropper). Get a long bellied 5 wt floater for lakes and you'll be able to toss it a mile.
 

Steelheader

Only 3 more years until I can think like a fish.
#9
If you are already using your 4wt I would go for the six, and you can set the 4 up for your dries, and the 6 for casting bigger flies, and nymphing.
 
#10
My go to rod for trout is a six weight when I am fishing from a boat. Steelhead, pinks, sockeye, large trout, small mouth you name it. Great rod! :beer1:
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#11
Well I prefer a 5wt in the good old summertime. A 6wt is nice for the wind but I still prefer the 5wt. Got some big fish on the 5wt with no problems.

Jim
 

Whitey

Active Member
#12
Both. For the yak, I fish a 5 weight for drys, medium fast action. For streamers and the dredded "double nymph rig" I use a fast 6 weight. Same with lakes over their, in fact, if I can I take both rods with me. YT :cool:
 
#13
My 5 wgt is a slow rod, closer to a 4 wgt., that I use when delicate presentation is a factor; my 9'6" 6 wgt is fast, closer to a 7 wgt., in fact loads better with a 7 wgt line when distance/wind casting. The 5 wgt is nice to use as it has a softer touch and very sensitive tip. Most of the fish caught in the Yakima are readily taken on the 5 wgt. However, to this day I still recall standing helpless on a mid-river bar watching a true trophy Yakima Bow leaping down stream from me about 250 ft away with my size 16 green butt caddis in his mouth before I had to bust him off as I just couldn't pull the fish out of the fast water with the 5 wgt. It just doesn't have the butt to play a big fish hard in hard current. Where the river banks allow running after a fish and playing it, I have landed summer run steelhead on the 5 wgt., but that Bow kicked my butt that day. If I ever get another shot at a trophy fish, I will be using the right rod to bring 'em to hand. If I had been using a stiffer 5 wgt., I might have pulled it off, I dunno. :confused: I have purchased a medium fast 5 wgt this winter to hopefully bridge the gap.
 

Richard E

Active Member
#14
If you like to fish with dries and nymphs, get a fast 5 wt.

If you fish damsels and chironimids in lakes, get a fast 5 wt.

If you like to fish heavy weighted flies and sink tips and streamers in rivers, or fish buggers and fish deep in lakes, get a 6 wt.

I differ with the popular theory here; I have GLX and SP 6 weights, and XP and TFO TiCr 5 weights, all fast rods. If I fished trout primarily, I'd stick with the 5 weights, because the 5 weights fish small dries (say, #12 and smaller) better than the 6's.

There's a reason why, when a rod company comes with new rods, that the first 2 rod weights offered are 5 weight and 8 weight. Think about it. :thumb:
 
#15
I'd agree with the guys pushing you toward the 6 wt. You don't need rods with so close a line weight, 4 and 6 wt would be a good combination. Then you can add an 8 and a 10 wt in the future. Over the years I have gone to 3, 5, 7, 9, & 12. Think down the road and you will eventually find you need a wider spread of rods to cover all fishing situations.