Where to go for a good time in the Winter?

Skip Enge

Active Member
#47
someone said college is over rated...well maybe in that it is not a guarantee of anything, or with a degree there is a fulfilled promise of money but at least for me ...it helped me connect some dots that in life are very rewarding...sure there are other ways to accrue knowledge...but for me it broadened my perspective of many phenomenons around me... I finally realized my formal education didn't make me right about anything outwardly but made me more at peace with it. I realized in my heart i am a moralist...and I am okay with that.
 
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#48
the fly fishing industry
shit, i bet there isnt NO ONE on this forum who has made a career out of the 748.6 million dollar retail fly fishing industry, or in a related service industry that caters to the ~ 3.83 million fly fishers in the USA. (examples could include guides, webmaster for popular fishing forums, instruction, boat building or maintenance, related art, etc etc etc.)

Mr. Rob Allen, did you give up on critical thinking in the last few years or what?

attention WFF members, there is NO OPPORTUNITY in the fly fishing industry. just give up now, and study to be whatever it is Rob Allen did to become the great wise rich sage he is.

ps. im not saying "dont go to college and join the fly fishing industry instead, that would be stupid advice, im just making a point about mr allen"
 
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The T.O. Show

Buenos Hatches Ese
#50
Kids go to college for all sorts of reasons, it's not just about the ROI. If you think it's overrated then you weren't doing it right. It's one of the best networking opportunities you'll ever have and could pay for itself in that respect alone. Most people would probably say the relationships (both professional and otherwise) they built at university made the whole thing worth it. Some people choose crap degrees because they want to learn something that blows their skirt up. If they aren't expecting it to make them a million bucks down the road then there is nothing wrong with that. And those who unknowingly end up with a degree that does little for them probably should have had more guidance from their parents/professors/etc., but that only means that person should have pinpointed their goals and catered their studies to achieve them.

If I could do it over I would have gone to school in Montana or Colorado so I could fish trout every day and work on a degree in fisheries/environmental sciences. But I didn't know at the time that 10 years down the road that's what I would care about the most. When I was 18 I wanted to snowboard as much as possible, so I went somewhere I could do that and got a business degree. No regrets, it got me where I'm at now and I fish a shit ton, so no big deal.

I can't imagine anything better for a kid who likes to fly fish than leaving home to go to college somewhere like the University of Montana. You guys saying start an apprenticeship and work hard until you're 40-50 then enjoy yourself later are off your rocker. Yeah, waste the best time of your life doing something you don't care about so that maybe later in life you can have fun. Different strokes for different folks I guess, but no thanks. You can go learn something at a university that actually interests you, make a bunch of friends you'll have forever, chase chicks until you find one you really like, and study hard enough that you can land a job when you're done, then continue to do all the things that you love because you make enough coin to do it. There isn't anything wrong with either path, but it's only overrated if you snooze your way through life wishing you did something different.
 
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Lymitliss

Active Member
#51
Here is my only advice on the subject kid. This is a lesson you don't want to learn the hard way, trust me, I've been there.... Never attend Deja Vu (or a similar establishment) while the sun is still up. You get the B-team, or worse, the C-team. You can't unsee the C-team...

He ain't lyin.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
#52
shit, i bet there isnt NO ONE on this forum who has made a career out of the 748.6 million dollar retail fly fishing industry, or in a related service industry that caters to the ~ 3.83 million fly fishers in the USA. (examples could include guides, webmaster for popular fishing forums, instruction, boat building or maintenance, related art, etc etc etc.)

Mr. Rob Allen, did you give up on critical thinking in the last few years or what?

attention WFF members, there is NO OPPORTUNITY in the fly fishing industry. just give up now, and study to be whatever it is Rob Allen did to become the great wise rich sage he is.

Ok maybe i should be more specific. Without a formal degree of training or inate talent you are not going to get a family supporting job by working for someone else.
Now if i would have gotten a business degree i could be a sales rep. If i would have worked harder earlier and put money away instead of spending it all in nothing while in my 20s maybe bought a house back then or even just stayed working for the cabinet shop where i started my working career I'd be in a much better position.

All i advocating is for young men to follow opportunities not chase dreams.
The fly fishing industry is not an industry full of opportunities for people who's only skill is fishing.
 
#53
Without a formal degree of training or inate talent you are not going to get a family supporting job by working for someone else.
for the first time ever, i agree with you. but realize there are other lifestyles the then 9-5 white picket fence american dream. I know lots of people who have no intention on raising family, working day jobs and instead spend life chasing there "dream" whatever it may be. Not surprising, those are the same people (or the ones who started like that), are most likely to achieve there "dream". For some people, that dream might even be a doctorate degree from Harvard, for others it might be a 300 day fishing season, or inventing widgets. Many paths through this world.
 
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Rob Allen

Active Member
#57
for the first time ever, i agree with you. but realize there are other lifestyles the then 9-5 white picket fence american dream. I know lots of people who have no intention on raising family, working day jobs and instead spend life chasing there "dream" whatever it may be. Not surprising, those are the same people (or the ones who started like that), are most likely to achieve there "dream". For some people, that dream might even be a doctorate degree from Harvard, for others it might be a 300 day fishing season, or inventing widgets. Many paths through this world.
That's all well and good until someone you love gets cancer and you have to pay for it. I think a person will generally be happier if they get themselves established while in their 20s than floundering around like i did. You don't want to be pushing 50 years old and not be able to afford a new pair of waders when you need them.
 
#58
I think I would generally be happier if I got myself established while in my 20s than floundering around like i did.
thats the thing rob,its my opinion that no one should care what another thinks will make them happy. I fixed your post for ya. hence why im saying, from the get go, chase your own dreams. dont think you have to do it some specific way because your friends, family, society, etc is telling you that it will be the best and the greatest and you will be so happy. Cheers. This 15 year old kid had no idea where this thread was gonna go! lol.

and to suggest that simply because some1 didnt go to college or follow a traditional american life path means that a loved ones potential future cancer can't be paid for???? you really like to reach dont ya?
 

Vladimir Steblina

Retired Forester...now fishing instead of working
#59
College taught me many things. Like how to smoke pot, drink beer, and chase women. My Forestry Degree was secondary.
I strongly disagree.

That Forestry degree rated right up there with drugs, sex and rock and roll.

It also meant that I got paid to backpack, mountain bike, x-country ski, dirt bike, etc. etc. There is nothing better, however, than squirting blue paint on trees. I still miss those days. I even had a fish biologist PAY ME to catch some cutthroats for his genetic research. Won't do that again, you won't hear my complaining about topography, brush, and rain when laying out a timber sale ever again.

Granted there was a dry period there for 15 years when they took away my truck keys and gave me a computer. That was a bad career move.

For cultural enrichment and diversity there was nothing better than going to school at Berkeley and working summers in Idaho during the early 1970's. The only thing they had in common was listening to Creedence on the jukebox.

Of course, you Montana foresters are definitely different. I remember when a bunch of them showed up in Berkeley. We ordered pitchers of beer and glasses for everyone. The Montana foresters just ordered pitchers of beer with NO GLASSES. They were still standing at the end of the night.

At 15 I had no clue how much better and meaningful my life was going to be simply by switching my major from Astronomy to Forestry.
 
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#60
I strongly disagree.

That Forestry degree rated right up there with drugs, sex and rock and roll.

It also meant that I got paid to backpack, mountain bike, x-country ski, dirt bike, etc. etc. There is nothing better, however, than squirting blue paint on trees. I still miss those days.

Granted there was a dry period there for 15 years when they took away my truck keys and gave me a computer. That was a bad career move.

For cultural enrichment and diversity there was nothing better than going to school at Berkeley and working summers in Idaho during the early 1970's. The only thing they had in common was listening to Creedence on the jukebox.

Of course, you Montana foresters are definitely different. I remember when a bunch of them showed up in Berkeley. We ordered pitchers of beer and glasses for everyone. The Montana foresters just ordered pitchers of beer with NO GLASSES. They were still standing at the end of the night.

At 15 I had no clue has much better and meaningful my life was going to be simply by switching my major from Astronomy to Forestry.

if it was 1970 i would probably still be a huge advocate for all young people going the college route. but its 2018. college is not what it used to be in many regards and its easier then ever to learn things without college that would have been very difficult to learn in 1970 without college.

It would take me more then 2 hands to count all the talented people i know with recent college degrees who work at Starbucks or the local pizza place type jobs (entry level +). I do know a couple who also used degrees to land pretty sweet jobs (one friend builds antarctic research drones, another is working for SpaceX as a network engineer, both also always dreamed of careers in those fields). The one thing they all still have in common is years of debt looming over them. Some are on a good path to pay it off, others are struggling and working long hours at a job they didn treally want, just trying to meet the basic needs and keep debt from taking over.

Of the same group of friends, the ones who are doing the best right now (nice homes, good incomes, etc) all share one thing in common! they didnt go to college and instead starting pursuing a career in a trade or skill that they were passionate and talented in.

We can of course co-exist with different views. If you want to go to college for any reason, more power to ya, chase that dream. Try to get avoid loans and get grants and scholarships. At 15 your at the perfect age to take that serious. get outstanding grades, be involved in your community, and know what it takes to get the scholarships you want. College is a much better prospect when its free or affordable.

If i