Pattern General Practitioner- some examples

o mykiss

Active Member
#2
Beautiful looking flies but a couple of questions:

1) on the version in the lower right corner of the first picture, what technique is used to flair the tail like that? (I've been trying to figure that out for a different fly.)

2) maybe I'm not seeing the flies clearly enough, but I thought the GP was supposed to have a V-cut golden pheasant tippet veiled by two breast feather tied in halfway up the shank? That part of the tie has always given me fits. I think it's a much easier tie to leave that center feather combo out.

Anyway, they are beautiful. Wish mine looked that good.
 

Davy

Active Member
#3
o mykiss said:
Beautiful looking flies but a couple of questions:

1) on the version in the lower right corner of the first picture, what technique is used to flair the tail like that? (I've been trying to figure that out for a different fly.)
It is just one or two golden pheasant breast feathers collared an butted up against the tag tinsel and tippet tail, it's hard to tell but there may be a small dubbing ball there as well. Another thing you can do is a few turns of stiff rooster neck hack before the turns of GP, this will help support it. From talking with my friends over there, of the two versions shown here , one is for the slower salmon pools and the other more swifter water(the flaired example).

2) maybe I'm not seeing the flies clearly enough, but I thought the GP was supposed to have a V-cut golden pheasant tippet veiled by two breast feather tied in halfway up the shank? That part of the tie has always given me fits. I think it's a much easier tie to leave that center feather combo out.

Anyway, they are beautiful. Wish mine looked that good.
Yup,, the original dressing call for it to be tyed in two steps - i.e.; the rear body and forward body. The rear body sported the Vee'd and cemented GP tippet over which were two or three GP breast feathers. Followed by the same forward body with palmered hackle topped with 3 or 4 xlarge GP breasts, extending into the tippet twisting large bucktail tails .

This is how I still dress the fly but it can certainly be omitted for speed .The tippet can still be added in the middle in one piece construction. Just before you begin dubbing and finishing the body make a few turns with the tinsel to figure where it will wrap thru, then tie in your tippet piece.

The trick in the traditional dressing was to match up the rib and the hackle taper the best one could.

And cement and wrap back the wing stems as you tie them in, or they will pull out .

enjoy
 
#4
"Eyes" of golden pheasant tippet are the defining characteristic of General Practitioners. However, there are other prawn patterns, simple to complex, that use black metal bead chain or black plastic chain eyes, which are very simple to use.
 

Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
#5
Davey

Thanks for the images of the GP's. The fast water/slow water versions are especially nice but I can't tell from the photo whether they are tied with the traditional mid body tie-in point for the eyes and rear breast feathers, or if it is all tied in at the head.

Please do me a favor and lift the skirts on those little beauties and tell us what you see.

Thanks
TC
 

Davy

Active Member
#6
Tim- I don't have the flies in my possession, I asked the dresser and they are all tyed from the head-- easier.
 
#7
I was the guy that was asking about the Black GP, I found a few recipes and gave it a shot, here is the result:


I didnt have any spey hackle, so I used saddle hackles, so, I wasnt too happy with the hackle, but, I think it might entice a couple of fish :)

Dean

View attachment 4422
 

papafsh

Piscatorial predilection
#11
mdjm66 said:
I was the guy that was asking about the Black GP, I found a few recipes and gave it a shot, here is the result:
I didnt have any spey hackle, so I used saddle hackles, so, I wasnt too happy with the hackle, but, I think it might entice a couple of fish :)

Dean

View attachment 4422

If it don't catch 'em, we might as well take up golf :eek:

LB
 

Ringlee

Doesn't care how you fish Moderator
#12
Here are a couple big ones to look at. I will tie a couple black ones this big and put them on here as well.
Enjoy,
Chris
 

Willie Bodger

Still, nothing clever to say...
#14
So, I see that in the photo of the black GP, the GP tippets are still used, so is the thought that it is still imitating a shrimp? I like the idea of the black GP, I've got some materials to tie up some nice ones (well, as nice as my paltry skills can muster), but I'm trying to determine the efficacy of the tippet 'eyes' on the black version. Any thoughts? Or perhaps I am overthinking the whole thing?

Willie
 

BertBrehm

Two hands, baby.
#15
G.P. -- General Practitioner now, but originally named for Golden Pheasant

"I christened the fly 'G.P.' because most of the ingredients are golden pheasant. But I later changed this to 'General Practitioner' because it proved so deadly!"
-- Lt Colonel Esmond Drury

The General Practitioner was developed in the early 1950's by Lt Colonel Esmond Drury as an imitation of a shrimp to be used on the River Test. Anglers on that salmon fishing 'beat' used to use live shrimp on a hook to fish for salmon. The land owners banned this practice so Drury developed this fly to imitate the native Northern Shrimp. He tied the fly on size 2 hooks but found that the smaller hooks caught more fish especially in the more shallow water areas. The original consisted of golden-pheasant body feathers and orange fur. He called this fly G.P. at first because of the golden pheasant feathers that went to make up the large part of this pattern. The General Practitioner has a better record than most, fished on a floating line at low levels in the summer. It has proved very effective on a wide range of waters from America, Canada, Scandinavia, Britain and Iceland. The name changed to General Practitioner because of its effectiveness. It is a very popular and effective fly in brownish and murky rivers.