$2 nonscaring Wood Stove for backcountry cooking

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by rooinater, Sep 23, 2009.

  1. rooinater aka "JAWS"

    Posts: 32
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Over the last month I finally started prototyping some miniature Wood-gas stoves. Basically it's a double walled stove that creates convection currents to suck air into the fuel chamber and drive the fire. I've gone through a couple different revisions and modifications to the design over the last month, but what I wound up with using is a $1 Campbell's Tomato Soup can and an Albertsons $1 light peaches can. Don't mind the hardware cloth mesh, if you have to purchase it, it's an extra $8 at home depot. Due to being poor and having a slight obsession with minimalism I didn't want to spend $100+ for a bushbuddy stove, and I wanted a lighter version that would nest into my Trapper mug. I also did not know if I would actually like using a wood burner as my main stove. So there began my dyslexic trip with prototyping. Here's some pictures and there's more on the blog links that are in the post.

    Part 1
    http://rooinater.blogspot.com/2009/09/wood-gas-stove-for-bpl-trapper-mug.html

    Part 2
    http://rooinater.blogspot.com/2009/09/wood-gas-stove-for-bpl-trapper-mug-part.html

    Part 3
    http://rooinater.blogspot.com/2009/09/wood-gas-stove-for-bpl-trapper-mug-part_23.html


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    Initial burn proto 1
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    The stove nested in my mug.
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    Rev. 2.0
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    proto 1 modified and proto 2
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    Final revisions on the chopping block to be fired up for the dyslexic video.
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    I forgot to mention, the stove without a windscreen or pot support only weighs 2.6 oz. I'm still playing with the pot support height and figuring out a good windscreen design.
  2. Tony Mull Member

    Posts: 832
    Lake Stevens, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Great idea. will be keeping an eye on the project. my wife has a dremel.....
  3. rooinater aka "JAWS"

    Posts: 32
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    The only thing I have left to play with is the height of the pot support and figuring out a windscreen. It's been a fun project so far, heck I get to light fires in my backyard all the time and I saved well over $100 to find out if I even wanted a wood stove... In the coming weeks we have a tentative plan for a trip from Chinook Pass to White Pass, where I intend to field test it, even though I've been using twigs from the base of trees anyhow... The real test is after a 10 to 15 mile hike am I going to feel like gathering wood and starting a fire.

    For larger pots you can use a large refried bean can and then find soup can that will nest into it and do the same thing, but will have a larger burn box.
  4. Tony Mull Member

    Posts: 832
    Lake Stevens, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    how long does it take to boil a qt of water? How much wood? Wish i had run accross one of these bck when I could still walk farther than the truck :rolleyes: Fuel really is a significant weight item on a long trip.
  5. rooinater aka "JAWS"

    Posts: 32
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Boil time from starting the fire till it boiled was about 12 minutes or less depending on the wood, wind and other variables. From the point where you place the pot on the stove the actual boil time for the coldest water I could get out of the tap is between 8 to 10 minutes so far.

    The wood piles next to the stove is approximately what was required to load the stove, tend the fire, and bring the water to a boil. It all depends on how dry the wood is and a few other variables like the type of wood. I kept boiling the water till I reached about 45 minutes, so I used a lot more twigs than that. Which is kind of the nice thing, and part of the reason I wanted to play with a wood stove, endless fuel supplies in most of Washington.

    I'd be carrying about .3 to .5 ounces worth of cotton balls coated with vaseline for tinder and an esbit backup tab for the longer journeys, if I decide to keep using the wood burner.
  6. Herry New Member

    Posts: 17
    Boise, Idaho
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    That is cool. Thanks for sharing your efforts.
  7. Brad Niemeyer Old School Member

    Posts: 676
    Woodinville, WA
    Ratings: +42 / 0
    Nice work! Is it burning the wood or the gas from the wood?

    Looks a bit like a woodgas stove design I've seen for making artist's charcoal and/or Biochar.

    How about a technical drawing of the stove?
  8. Zack Dudley Take em'

    Posts: 483
    Port Orchard, Washington
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    im working on making a bit bigger one out of a coffee can and a bigger refried bean can.
  9. Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

    Posts: 2,572
    Mount Vernon, WA
    Ratings: +106 / 0
    I about blew it out my nose Tony :D
  10. Tony Mull Member

    Posts: 832
    Lake Stevens, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    ya, sometimes just to stay in shape, I park at the end of the driveway.
  11. Allison Banned or Parked

    Posts: 829
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Is that including the immense pile of cigarettes in the ashtray pictured, or just the wood? Honest question.

    Pretty impressive boil time for the materials shown. Please show us the bigger stove when you get it done. I love the idea, if the stove is efficient enough.
  12. Kerfwappie Member

    Posts: 330
    Poulsbo, WA
    Ratings: +3 / 0
    Hey Jared, Nice stove! Good clean workmanship. Have you tried it with a fan? I've seen a few other woodgas stoves that use a CPU cooling fan to force the air and control temp and efficiency. Of course that does stray away from "minimalist" ideals a little. Have you tried alcohol stoves? Those are pretty lightweight, but of course you still have to pack your fuel with you. Here are a few links that I've found.

    http://www.zenstoves.com
    http://www.minibulldesign.com

    Eric
  13. rooinater aka "JAWS"

    Posts: 32
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    nope, the cigarettes aren't mine. I don't smoke, my dad does and that's where I'm back living until I'm done with the first round of college.

    The stove uses updraft convection currents to feed the air into the stove. Some companies, and a lot of people call them wood-gas, even though they aren't truly a wood gas stove.

    Sorry it took so long to get back on here. New computers, and I've been swamped with trying to find time to go salmon fishing between my Organic Chemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology courses... So at the moment I'm tapped out for time but will be making a larger one soon enough. I still need to shorten my bivy sack and adjust a few other things.
  14. rooinater aka "JAWS"

    Posts: 32
    Gig Harbor, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    yeah, but the batteries add up, not that I'd have to take much for extras. The updraft currents in this model seem to work great for burning semi dry wood so far and when it starts stiffling you just need to blow in the opening and it generally flairs back up. I still haven't had the time to get out and use it on the trail yet... I'll probably do a late season hike next month on my holiday weekend, Veteran's Day.