Just acquired some polar bear hair (Don't hurt me)

Nick Riggs

I've been known to fish from time to time...
#16
They sell it in the shops in Canada, but not in the USA.
Maybe I saw imitation polar bear hair. It was 14 bucks for a tiny patch, however, I have a terrible memory. Does anybody have any suggestions for an awesome fly to tie with my polar bear hair? I've been saving it for something special and haven't found anything yet.
 
#17
Not to hijack the thread here but Polar Bear fur you would use to tie flies with is hollow.
Beat me to it. It's the nature of the hair (hollow) that gives it's high insulating qualities (for the Bear). It's reflective qualities give the hunting bear (effectively) 'camouflage' when it's on snow.

Edit: You think you know how to 'fish?' So does he (sorry for the short add in front).:
 
#18
A few years ago you could buy real polar bear hear at the Morning Hatch. It was sold as a polar bear worm toy. It had two sitck on eyes. I have quite a few files ties with it. I mainly used it for either baitfish pattern, and steelhead flies.

 
#23
nice stuff RDL, it looks like you raided my desk. :) I picked some up years ago from a friend. I even got my hands on some seal dub.

it's been done Nick. ;)

Purple seal, and purple polarbear

 

dryflylarry

"Chasing Riseforms"
#25
I have been using a Hareline material called "Ice Fur Polar Bear Cream". It has better reflective qualities (to me) than Polar Bear hair (which a couple of pieces have laid in my drawer for a good number of years now). I love this material and am now adding it to old patterns with good success.
 

fullerfly

Calvin Fuller
#26
We sold it at "The Guides' Fly Shop" in B-ham, Now over here in Sandpoint, ID I sell P. Bear flies for 13.95 each....ouch!!! People are convinced it will help them catch the dwindling Lake Pend Oreille Rainbow...
 
#27
Answers to this question by USFWS

I got tired of arguing with tyers about the legalities/illegalities of various tying materials (i.e. coots, american wood cock, & other non-webb footed migratory game birds, as well as polar bear, seal and etc.) , so I recently emailed the US Fish and Wildlife Service with a series of "tying supply" questions and here is the section of the USWFS's response dealing with polar bear:

What Lacey Act issues surround the possession of polar bear or seal hide/hair?

50 CFR 18.13 prohibits the possession, sale or transportation of Polar bear or seals and their parts or products taken in violation of the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Certain exemptions apply for legally hunted and imported polar bears and marine mammal parts and products held prior to the act or marine mammal products crafted and sold by Alaskan Natives. (See 50 CFR 18 Subpart C General Exception, for further information) The Lacey Act applies to wildlife and plants, including marine mammals, imported, transported, sold, received, acquired that have been taken, possessed transported or sold in violation of State, Federal, foreign or Tribal laws. If you need further clarification of potential Lacey Act issues associated with marine mammals please provide specific details or examples.

What is required to "prove" that the polar bear hide/hair is legal for possession by that tyer?

Polar bear hair or the hide may only be possessed if it was acquired pre-act, legally hunted and imported or purchased in the form of a native handicraft from an Alaskan native. Authentic native handicrafts made of marine mammals may be bought and sold, but must be in their original condition. Documentation could include a bill of sale, U.S. Fish and Wildlife import declarations, CITES permits, airway bills, etc. or any record that substantiates the possession is lawful under the above mentioned exemptions.
 
#28
I believe that there are a couple of licensed purveyors of polar bear hair. To be on the safe side, consider it illegal to own. The other side of the coin is that many of us who are very long in the tooth still own a fair amount of it for personal use from the days when we could buy it from Tom Darling at Avid Angler (the old Seattle shop), or Clarence Shoff, owner of Shoff's Sporting Goods in Kent. This was prior to passage of legislation outlawing endangered animal fur or feathers.
Les Johnson
 
#29
I believe that there are a couple of licensed purveyors of polar bear hair. To be on the safe side, consider it illegal to own. The other side of the coin is that many of us who are very long in the tooth still own a fair amount of it for personal use from the days when we could buy it from Tom Darling at Avid Angler (the old Seattle shop), or Clarence Shoff, owner of Shoff's Sporting Goods in Kent. This was prior to passage of legislation outlawing endangered animal fur or feathers.
Les Johnson
Gadzooks Les. :beathead:

Did you have to remind me how old I am?bawling:
 

FT

Active Member
#30
Bowfin47,

In other words, you were told by the US Fish & Wildlife Service exactly what myself and some other have been saying about polar bear in past posts. Namely that unless you can prove it was acquired prior to January 1, 1972 (when the act went into effect) by either yourself or the seller, or that it is an Alaskan Native or Alaskan Eskimo craft item in its original form (like those little worm things that Morning Hatch was selling in years past), it is not legal to have it in your possession (this includes flies tied with it) or sell it.

This is why myself and several others have repeatedly said that unless whoever is selling it can provide you with a copy of the proof that it was acquired prior to January 1, 1972, or a copy of the proof that the craft item came from an Alaskan Native or Alaskan Eskimo, you are better off leaving it alone.