Blue..... the new purple??

Panhandle

Active Member
#1
Variations of blue intrigue me. My all important confidence is with purple, but I would like to try blue this fall. What have your experiences been with blue as opposed to a usual purple
pattern?
 

Jeremy Floyd

fly fishing my way through life
#3
Blue is a great color. It makes a great bead color a month or so after the spawn... (totally joking Panhandle)

Blue is one of my go to colors in clear or dirty water.
 

Preston

Active Member
#4
Blue has alaways been one of my favorite colors, particularly for summer-runs. A simple, blue (silver doctor blue) and purple, spun marabou was my go-to pttern for many years. Blue has traditionally been a widely used color for low-water Atlantic salmon patterns (Blue Charm and others). Here's a a simple pattern that I call the Pseudospey (I also tie it in other colors). The other is an Atlantic salmon fly from the Margaree River region, the Big Intervale Blue.
 

miyawaki

Active Member
#5
With the exception of a couple fish, Ross and I have been catching our summer steelhead in the Snoqualmie for the last couple years on a #6 Blue Charm. Gotta love that teal blue.

Leland.
 

Red Shed

"junkyard spey"
#6
Blue seems to work pretty good over here on the Clearwater. Leroy Hyatt of Lewiston has come up with a mostly blue fly called the "Papa Smurf". For the short time it's been around it's been successful.

After it gets colder and the water is clear a small black marabou with a fl blue guinea collar works really well here.
 
#7
As A Perfect Circle sings:

"Such a lovely color for you!" ;)

Blue and black is definitely the new purple. I've had very good luck with blue...more so in the winter mostly though just because I'm always fishing more natural colors or small black something during the summer.

In the winter time try a Blue Exasporator!!! But you had better have a big rod to cast it!!!

Christian
 
#15
Interesting this question should come up. Here on the Rogue, which not a lot of folks actually know, is we have two sets of summer runs. The first, and largest in numbers, are the 'A' fish which will run 3-6 pounds on average. The second run ('B's' if you will) enter the upper river usually in October and will be double the size of the 'A' fish.

For the first group, never touched a fish with a fly incorporating a 'light blue.' The 'B-Boys' a whole new thing. :thumb: