Warmest fishing gloves

Nate Dutton

I'm a teacher, I fish to eat!
#17
What if simms were to make a wool glove!!! JEEZ boys i think we just beat the pants off of the simms "think tank boys" Someone rush to the patent office!!! And then we will sell the rights to simms.........rich i tell you rich!!!!
 
#18
What if simms were to make a wool glove!!! JEEZ boys i think we just beat the pants off of the simms "think tank boys" Someone rush to the patent office!!! And then we will sell the rights to simms.........rich i tell you rich!!!!
They could really improve the design by adding the Simms tag. I'd gladly pay another, say, 30 bucks for that. Hell that's nothing. I paid, oh, probably 100 for the tag on my waders :D
 
#19
My Simms G3's have been extremly dissapointing. They leak like a sive and are only a couple years old. Might have been me, but I treated my Old Simms classics the same way and didnt have issues for at least 5 years.
 

SpeySpaz

still an authority on nothing
#21
I also use Glacier gloves to keep my hands dry. For the really cold days I put heat packs on the palm side of my wrists. I may be warm and dry but I still cast like crap.
man, that really works too. I put a couple handwarmers on the inside of my wrists and I started sweating...
and I'll put another agree with Jason in too-
once you get into the low twenties it stops being fun and starts getting risky. You fall in, you might not make it back to your truck. BBRRR
 

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#23
Put on a hat, warms everything. If it is really cold I like my thinner neoprene gloves and can do what I need to in them. I even can tie knots with them on if necessary. I once tied a nail knot without a tool on a cold as hell day. I needed a new leader on, and the cold day was the only day I had free to fish.
 
#24
i really didnt think the cold was that big of deal. if your afraid of frostbite, maybe dont let yourself get that cold? i layered correctly i was toasty. plus i was generally on the move covering ground, keeping the blood going. keeping the guides from icing was tricky but the trout were still biting. i had some great days and i wasnt the only one out there toughin it out.

definitely not nearly as cold as float tubin a lake in the winter. that is rediculous and i doubt any pair of simms anything will keep your feet from falling off.
 
#25
For late season "Thompson River type cold" or mid-winter on the Skagit, I like the fingerless fleece gloves with the mittens that can be pulled over my bare digits. If it really gets cold I have pulled on a pair of lightweight neoprene gloves under them. It gets bulky but still workable. We have these gloves at Orvis.
Les Johnson
 
#26
i wonder if theres any electric gloves where you like use a double a and it has a wire through the glove or something. As dumb as it sounds to mix electricity and gloves that get wet often im sure someone could do it right, and your not dealing with much electricity with a double a
 

TC

I live with wind knots
#27
Regarding the feet thing, I have had my toes frost bit black in a moose hunt when I was younger, so they are extra sensitive to the cold. Hurt like hell when they get cold now. SO I buy my boots a size too big, put 3 pair of wool socks over a pair of smart socks, and do they stay warm. my legs will freeze off before my feet feel it.
 

Tom Johnston

Been around a while
#28
Regarding the feet thing, I have had my toes frost bit black in a moose hunt when I was younger, so they are extra sensitive to the cold. Hurt like hell when they get cold now. SO I buy my boots a size too big, put 3 pair of wool socks over a pair of smart socks, and do they stay warm. my legs will freeze off before my feet feel it.
I hate my feet getting cold. Once they get cold my whole body gets cold!
 

fredaevans

Active Member
#29
I can 'relate.'

Fishing in single digit weather is just plain dumb. That can truly cause permanent damage. It happened to me in Montana and that was it for me. Now my toe is numb most of the time which isn't bad but it could have been a lot worse.
Frost bite (and it does continue to 'bite') on three fingers on my left hand. Much below 40 degrees and gloves have to go on (circulation problem, and I'm sure smoking doesn't help) ...

Regardless of your choice of glove(s), AND hat, is to keep in mind that you lose about 25% of your body heat from the neck up, and another 15% (give or take) from your hands. Keeping both warm AND dry is key to staying warm during the winter. A set of nitrite/doctors gloves will go a long way in dealing with the bottom 15%.

:ray1:
Fred
 

Hoopa

cantreMember
#30
Had to resurrect this thread to find a better way to keep the fingers from freezing. I was on the river this a.m. in 15 degrees wearing nitrile gloves and fingerless wool gloves. My fingers froze!! Tomorrow it is supposed to get up to mid 30's but I am replacing the fingerless with full fingered wool gloves. Hope that works.