5 wt grain weight???

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Scott Behn, Jan 19, 2005.

  1. Scott Behn

    Scott Behn Active Member

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    I have a cortland 333 7wt floating line (weight foward) that I bought about a year ago. Well needless to say its front taper was cut off 2 nights ago by moi and I want to buy some tips to make it a "versi-tip" type line.

    The question I have is I don't really know what the designated grain weight for a 5wt rod is. Now using the wff7 is slowing my rod down from med. fast to around a med slow action, which is fine for me (I like the slow action for this rod) I don't know if I should buy tips for a 7wt to match the line or go with something smaller like a 6 or 5wt tips.

    The rod is my Fenwick Streamer 9' 5wt.

    Thanks

    :confused:
     
  2. Anil

    Anil Active Member

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    Scott,
    A 5 weight line weighs 140 grains (in the first 30’). A 7 weight line weighs 185 grains (30’).
    If you are happy with the way that the 7 casts with your rod, I have the following suggestions:
    1. Make sure you cut most or the entire front taper from your 333. I don’t know exactly what the length of the front taper is on this particular line, but probably 5’-7’. The reason I am suggesting this, is that tapered lines (like yours) do not maintain a constant grain per foot density. Although the average weight of your 7 weight is 6.1gr/ft. The tip and taper sections will weigh less than this, and the belly section will weigh slightly more.
    2. Use either 5 or 6 weight sink tips. By cutting your 7 weight line back, and using a “lighter” tip, you achieve a taper (in weight) similar to what your line already had. In other words, you will have line that weighs over 6 grains/ft. turning over line that weighs 5.33 grains/ft. (5.33 grains/ft. is the average weight of a #6).
    3. Use shorter tips. It will be a lot easier with any rod, but particularly a 5 weight, to turn over a 10’-12’ tip than a 15’.


    These are just suggestions. I hope they help.
    Anil
    www.pugetsoundflyco.com
     

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