5 wt line on a 6 weight rod?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by FlyMeARiver, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. FlyMeARiver

    FlyMeARiver Da Mailman! Making sure you get yours!

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    I am wondering if you can use 5 weight line on a 6 weight rod without it hampering the casting ability too much. Curious if anyone has tried this.
     
  2. CoastalCutt

    CoastalCutt Member

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    Yeah, It'll cast, just won't shoot or cast as smoothly, I usually put one line size larger on my rods so they have some extra "fling" when casting. Like on my four weight, I run a five weight line, and so on. But it should work fine. I would rather use the line I have than go drop sixty bucks for a new one.
     
  3. FlyMeARiver

    FlyMeARiver Da Mailman! Making sure you get yours!

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    Cool,reason I ask is that I have a new reel and put 5 weight line on it and am waiting for my new rod which is also 5 weight. For the time being my old rod is 6 weight, so thanks!!
     
  4. CoastalCutt

    CoastalCutt Member

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    Go get em' then!
     
  5. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

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    Most graphite rods will handle a size lighter, and a size heavier, line than the rod is rated for, at least passably well, and frequently so well that the rod might have been rated for both or all three line sizes. In using a five line on a six-wt. rod, the worst that will happen is that after casting for hours, you'll be a little more tired - because you have to use a bit more power on each cast.
     
  6. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    Deepends on many factors, including your rod, the line itself (model and brand), the flies you intend to use, the distances you plan to cast, the weather conditions in which you plan to use it, your type of csting stroke, and probably the biggest (literally and figuratively), your casting abilities.

    Generally speaking, although you may get by with using the 5 line on your 6, you will likely be dissatisfied. The lighter line won't load (that's the 'fling' someone else noted earlier) the rod properly without aerializing more line than you would have to with the matching line weight or heavier. For most fly fishers, aerializing the appropriate amount of line or adjusting the casting stroke accordingly would be the biggest challenge.

    Looks like you'll get a chance to try it and see for yourself. Nothing like a little self-discovery!
     
  7. onlywaytofly

    onlywaytofly One Fish at a Time

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    I've always been told you can go 1 size higher or lower with no difficulty, I'm currently using 4wt line on a 3wt rod and is casts fine under all conditions. I've even used 5wt line on a 7wt rod with no problems. I listen to advice and usually go with what works for me.
     
  8. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

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    TC,

    Yes, you can. But it probably won't perform as well as a 6 wt. And if the rod is a stiff, fast action rod, then the performance will be even worse for most casters. You can cast a fly line with your bare hands if you practice a bit. But it's ever so much more enjoyable with a rod and line that are balanced to work together.

    Sg
     
  9. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide

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    By all means go fishing with your mixed wt setup until your new rod arrives. Its close enough to "make do." :thumb:
     
  10. tythetier

    tythetier Fish Slayer

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    GIVE IT A SHOT! WHATS THE WORST THAT WILL HAPPEN, YOU TANGLE YOUR LINE CUSS AND SWEAR A BIT AND GO BACK HOME. I THREW MY 6WT LINE ON MY 8WT ROD TO CATCH SOME WHITIES ON THE CROOKED. I WAS JUST FLIPPIN NYMPHS, THE THING WOULDNT FLIP WORTH A DAMN UNLESS I PUT SOME UMPHH BEHIND IT.
     
  11. Steelheader

    Steelheader Only 3 more years until I can think like a fish.

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    Dude it will make due for you for the time being. Like stated before you just might have to give it a little extra.
     
  12. Tom Bowden

    Tom Bowden Active Member

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    I think it depends on the line. Most of my bamboo rods cast better with sinking lines and double taper lines that are one line-weight lower compared to the matching WF floater. For example, a rod that casts well with a WF7 floating line will typically like a WF6 sinking line or a DT6 floating line.

    It depends a lot on your casting style and how far you are casting.

    Tom
     
  13. yuhina

    yuhina Tropical member

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    All good points... Proper loaded rod is easy to cast...
    Also noted "unproper matching" still can cast too. In Europe, there is some people use stiff rod (6-8wt) rod to cast light weight lines (3wt) for gaining a tighter loop and for competition (for fun). I tried it on my 8wt 9'6 rod and it did cast the entire 3wt line.... so the job could be done... I use light weight line for high sticking and the small diameter decrease the drag and the wind impact... like Richard said, it all depends on what type of fishing you are doing...
     
  14. FlyMeARiver

    FlyMeARiver Da Mailman! Making sure you get yours!

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    I actually ordered a Scierra rod and their website says their rods have two numbers, the lower # is for dt line and the higher is for wf. I think they just want me to buy another spool for my reel! I appreciate hearing this though, I think there is something to that. Thanks for the input everyone!
     
  15. Kyle Smith

    Kyle Smith Active Member

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    I was forced to use 4 line on a 5 for a few weeks and though I really didn't like the feel, it casted #10-#20 flies exactly the same. I like uplining when I have to cast heavier flies at shorter distances. My favorite streamer rig is a medium action 6wt rod with an 8wt sink tip. This setup shoots really well while keeping backcasts to a minimum for brushy rivers like the wallace or the skookumchuck.
     

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