accuracy vs. distance

thewaker

Tight line takes ain't no fakes!!
#16
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Leroy Laviolet

Aint no nookie like chinookie
#17
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Why didn't I think of that...

Stu, A Priest !! Very impressive !!
 
#18
It depends on the river. On larger waters where fish can be holding just about any where I will wing it out as far as I can to cover a ton of water. On smaller waters I am looking to hit specific pockets and seams that I know or suspect hold fish. Just like with single hand rods the more you can do with the rod the more situations you can fish successfully. Work both accuracy and distance in your practice sessions.
 
#19
Neither acuracy nor distance mean a thing if you don't understand the concept of reading the water in regards to the conditions Reading water is primary. Then it is being able to cast to a spot that will allow the fly to either swing or drift into the desired lie.

Too often people get obsessed with how far they can cast and overlook the real holding water! Quite often that water is right where many people have waded out to throw long casts, across several seams, to hit the far side of the river.

It is not about how much water you "cover" in any given presentation, it is all about how well water is covered in a likely lie! To do that requires accuracy.

More time should be spent looking at the river and analysing the dynamics before making a cast. Laying out long casts without fore thought is a low productive way to fish. The more seams and or current irregularities a cast crosses the less procictive a presentation. Distance without being able to control the line properly is a hinderance rather than an aid.

Dave
 

Leroy Laviolet

Aint no nookie like chinookie
#22
Dave, you are wasting your time. These threads are not about learning.
Yes, they are. They were put here to get some dialogue going about fishing with the two handed rod, since the spey forum was very slow as of late-
That was all there was to it reguardless of your opinion- Sorry it hasn't worked out for you-
 
#23
both apply to different conditions, yesterday i fished through a run first, i can out cast my partner and he picked my pocket from behind by making the cast needed to cover the bucket properly, later on we fish a giant run and i was in the back blasting out there and i hooked up on a fish he didn't cover. To be what i consider an accomplished caster you need to be able to control both.
 
#24
both apply to different conditions, yesterday i fished through a run first, i can out cast my partner and he picked my pocket from behind by making the cast needed to cover the bucket properly, later on we fish a giant run and i was in the back blasting out there and i hooked up on a fish he didn't cover. To be what i consider an accomplished caster you need to be able to control both.
Please define `blasting out there` I ask because there is casting it out there and really casting it out there, an acomplished angler can cast long but at the proper angle and be covering fish in the close buckets far more effectivlly than a short caster.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#26
Leroy,

If either distance or accuracy were requisite to steelheading success, I'd still be in search of my first steelhead. For most of my steelheading career I've been making 45 - 60' casts in the general direction of where I want to fish and hooked the steelhead that were available to be caught in those waters. Let's say I could have instead made consistent 100' casts with pinpoint accuracy. How would the results have differed? In my estimation, I wouldn't have caught one single additional fish, except on the Clearwater and Thompson Rivers, where steelhead holding water commonly occurs all across the rivers' cross-section.

For this discussion to have any meaning, and as open-ended as your question appears to be, based on the ........................... replies, I think you need to set some sideboards on the terms of accuracy and distance. When I think of fly casting accuracy, I think of putting dry flies inside the 30" diameter hoops used in casting contests, or in putting dry flies one foot or two feet from the river bank from a moving drift boat. I can do that often, but not really consistently. And because I'm mainly a steelheader, I've never bothered to focus on improving my casting accuracy, which I notice when I go to Yellowstone. And what is distance? 60', 100', 120'? My longest casts have been 90+' made on the lawn, so I know my best casts while wading waist deep are shorter, and I've never bothered to measure my Spey casts, altho I'm still trying to improve my technique with the method. If distance were really so important, on more than a few select waters, I'd dedicate my time to distance casting before burning the gas to drive to the steelhead rivers I fish, but it's just never been necessary.

I appreciate that you're trying to create more interest in this sub-forum, but I think your topic in this case is more relevant to the general forum than to this Spey Clave sub-forum

Sg
 

Panhandle

Active Member
#27
Salmo, Salmo, Salmo. Accuracy is very important. In fact, I will cast 20, sometimes even 40 times before I let the fly swing. If it doesn't land in the right spot the swing will be all messed up. One of the ways I improved this was to set a tea plate out 100 ft. Then I would single spey all day until I could nail that baby everytime. Since then, my catch rate has gone up to the point where I catch fish everytime out. Perhaps your expectations are too low....hmmm?
 
#28
The spey part of this forum has been very informational these days. From determining how long of a rod I should fish, to figuring out how taking a piss might affect my D loop to pinpointing how distance vs accuracy enhances/diminishes my steelhead catching odds, my learning curve has increased exponentially. Thanks guys for the great posts and keep em' coming!
 

James Mello

Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"
#29
Salmo, Salmo, Salmo. Accuracy is very important. In fact, I will cast 20, sometimes even 40 times before I let the fly swing. If it doesn't land in the right spot the swing will be all messed up. One of the ways I improved this was to set a tea plate out 100 ft. Then I would single spey all day until I could nail that baby everytime. Since then, my catch rate has gone up to the point where I catch fish everytime out. Perhaps your expectations are too low....hmmm?
Pan, this all well and good, but what about Skagit lines? If I were to cast to the same spot 40 times, I'd wear a hole in the river. What is one to do?
 
G

golfman65

Guest
#30
I have found that when I pee in a river...it will show me the hidden lies that steelhead are in...then I have to accurately distance cast or blast it out there 60' to reach the other side of my pee slick so I have the proper anchor....which in turn is in direct correlation to my rods length and of course how much I spent on my set up..as that is secretly the true definition of how good a spey fisherman I am...

everything else is turd polishing...

simple really.....