Why would I need to spey??

JS

Active Member
#16
You don't need to. People have been steelheading with single handers for 60+ years. Now, if you want cast
further, cover more water, have more line control, and fish with a lot less effort, spey is the way. It's also a blast
True, true. I picked up spey casting because it challanges me as a caster. It helps on large rivers, true, but I was swinging flys with my single hander on the eastside rivers (the mainstem of the columbia and snake included) long before I picked up a double handed rod.
 
#17
the "dark side" is looking better and better all the time. I don't know how much longer I can resist. Im thinking of the Sauk, Skagit, lower Skykomish, Nooksack around Deming, and anywhere with no backcast room, and how much more efficiently I could work the water with a two hander. I have well over 100 steelhead on the fly, but I know I could be doing a lot better with winter fish with a two hander. Faster sinking tips, and 7 inch intruders all day long.
 
#20
Spey is more of a technique than a rod. This morning I spent time on a small stream fishing for salmon with a 9'6" - 7wt rod and did only single and double spey casts as there was no room for anything else. Learn the techniques and you will find that no matter what rod you are using that you can cover water that is unreachable by other means. Switch and spey rods are worth the cost as they provide you with other options for different fishing conditions and river sizes. It is also a fun to learn new things.
 

Lugan

Joe Streamer
#21
Right on to all the posts. I got a Meiser 11'0" rod he calls a switch rod, but is really a short spey. It's a blast on smaller rivers and can still handle huge rivers as long as you don't feel the need to cast 100'.

Heck, I even use single-handed spey casts for trout all the time when streamer fishing. It's less tiring and keeps your fly in the water more. To echo the previous poster's idea: Use your 9'6" single-handed 8wt and try some single-handed spey casts. If you like it and want more power and ease, then you can go for a full on 2-hander. Check out these Youtube videos for starters:


 

Ian Broadie

Flyfishing is so "Metal"
#22
One big reason that I use a two hander is that rarely do I need to wade much past my knees so I stay warmer in the winter and can fish longer.

Yesterday I found myself wanting my 15' rod cus the fish were sitting in a seam about 75 to 80 feet out, which was a stretch with the scandi head on the 12'4" rod I was using, and square on the bottom. No, the fish were not any closer than that and the general commentary from the gear guys was they were amazed at how far out the fish were sitting.

but I suppose if I really needed to spey it's because I would not want any unwanted pets around....
 
S

stewart dee

Guest
#23
Right on to all the posts. I got a Meiser 11'0" rod he calls a switch rod, but is really a short spey. It's a blast on smaller rivers and can still handle huge rivers as long as you don't feel the need to cast 100'.

Since when was 11' considered a "Spey Rod" 2 handed?
 
#24
Well thanks for all of the comments. I think my plan is to get some steelhead under my belt with my current set up and then get into the spey game. I'll fish smaller rivers for now, this will help me to read water also and then move to the bigger rivers with the spey rod. Thanks alot guys :)
 

Lugan

Joe Streamer
#25
Right on to all the posts. I got a Meiser 11'0" rod he calls a switch rod, but is really a short spey. It's a blast on smaller rivers and can still handle huge rivers as long as you don't feel the need to cast 100'.

Since when was 11' considered a "Spey Rod" 2 handed?
Since Bob Meiser said so. He calls his 11' rods "Switch" rods, but in my phone chat with him he said they are 100% 2-handers and I would not be able to comfortably cast them 1-handed. He's correct. The rod I have is nothing like the 11' rods from Sage (Z-Axis), Orvis (Helios) or Winston (B2X) that I tried. Those can be cast 1-handed reasonably well; the Meiser is a totally different animal and is just a short spey rod.
 

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#26
Since Bob Meiser said so. He calls his 11' rods "Switch" rods, but in my phone chat with him he said they are 100% 2-handers and I would not be able to comfortably cast them 1-handed. He's correct. The rod I have is nothing like the 11' rods from Sage (Z-Axis), Orvis (Helios) or Winston (B2X) that I tried. Those can be cast 1-handed reasonably well; the Meiser is a totally different animal and is just a short spey rod.
Lugan I'll confirm that, not that you need any confirmation, because in a recent phone conversation with the Meiz he basically told me that very same thing.
 
S

stewart dee

Guest
#27
So ever other rod company labels them a switch? Is it the heavy material in the blank to create the taper in those Meiz rods that would classify it a two-hand stick? Its just not clear from his website as to if they are switch or two-hand. Sounds like you have it from the man himself- thanks.
 

Lugan

Joe Streamer
#30
So ever other rod company labels them a switch? Is it the heavy material in the blank to create the taper in those Meiz rods that would classify it a two-hand stick? Its just not clear from his website as to if they are switch or two-hand. Sounds like you have it from the man himself- thanks.
Stewart - It's the taper for sure, and probably the material. The Meiser "switch" rods are quite a bit softer than any other rod in the roughly 11' range that I've tried. The taper is a lot less "tippy" than the others I've tried, and the Meiser loads well into the butt section on a cast of any longer distance. The material is probably a lower-modulus graphite too. In a way, they remind me of a Winston WT or an old Scott G, but in spey form. It's super smooth and mellow, but a bit heavier too.