Pt Lonsdale, Victoria

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
#1
This X-mas we went to visit my folks in Pt. Lonsdale in Victoria, Australia. Caught some Australian Salmon, which are entirely different from Atlantic or Pacific species despite the same name. They are a nearshore fish and feed in the estuarine rivers, off the beaches and rock shelves. These guys were the target species.

Interestingly enough, although these fish are way more abundant, native and grow much bigger than the stocked trout in the mountains and rivers of Australia, the Melbourne area flyfishing community remains way more interested in catching planted trout in other rivers that sustain very slim to no breeding populations. The forked tail gives you an idea of how hard a fight they can put up in comparison to trout.



While these guys were caught with small soft plastic jigs that looked identical to whitebait, I went out at night in the Barwon River, a small tidal river, and caught a bunch on a slow stripped black wooley bugger on the outgoing tide. They have small mouths, small hooks work well. I tried a bunch of larger clousers but although I got some strikes, no hook sets were made.

Did some sightseeing as well- rockpools at low tide off the Back Beach:


Got something for Cabezon to identify:


And went on a sightseeing snorkel trip where we saw:


The tale of the tail has something to do with Steve Irwin.





All in all a fun trip, and solid fishing. On an outgoing tide with a 15 knot southeasterly wind blowing, everyone was catching Salmon, the place was mobbed, so you'll have to cut me some slack for using jigs with the kids instead of hauling outbound on the 8 weight...

 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
#3
Sweet trip, WB. Australia is on the bucket list, especially the Great Barrier Reef.

That little fish is some species in the family Tripterygiidae, aka threefin blennies. You can see a bunch of pictures of them here: http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Tripterygiidae. They are much like our local marine cottids, except they range into tropical waters as well as warm-temperate. Their maximum size is about 10". They do remind me of tidepool sculpins or Jordania zonope, the longfin sculpin.

Thanks for sharing,

Steve
 
#6
Happy New Year Boot looks like an amazing trip thanks for the report. Love the underwater shots what camera did you use? The kids look like they are having a blast.
 

Bob Jones

Still truckless now farther away
#8
Boot, nice job again always look forward for your postings Thanks again What a group of happy faces that's grand.