7 wt rod suggestions for steelhead/streamers

Discussion in 'Steelhead' started by Paaka, Jan 15, 2014.

  1. Paaka Member

    Posts: 31
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    Hey guys-
    Need suggestions/reviews of a couple 7 wt rods I am looking at for steelhead/large streamers for big browns (possible saltwater as well).
    I am looking at single handed rods only, haven't jumped into the switch/spey rods yet and would potentially be taking this rod saltwater fishing as well for bonefish.
    Would really appreciate everyone's input regarding the following rods:

    1) G Loomis NRX 10ft 7 weight (I realize not many people have probably fished this rod but like the length for steelhead, just not sure how it would handle large streamers and sinking line)
    2) G Loomis NRX 9ft 7 weight
    3) Sage One 9 1/2 ft 7 weight
    4) Sage Method 9 1/2 ft 7 weight
    5) Scott Radian 9 1/2 ft 7 weight

    Also, I have predominately fished 9 foot rods and would really like input from people who fish the 9 1/2 - 10 ft rods. Do you think a 10 ft rod is too long for chucking large streamers with sinking line?
    Really really appreciate everyone's input
    Thanks
  2. troutdopemagic Active Member

    Posts: 408
    Lake Stevens, Washington
    Ratings: +134 / 0
    I had a 10' Sage ONE 7 weight since they came out and I fished solely streamers and the occasional hopper when it was windy and besides the few times when you need to throw a big mend I felt the 10' didn't offer any sort of benefit and it almost made it more difficult to throw heavy streamers. After I broke it a second time I got Sage to give me the 9 footer and after fishing it extensively in the Yak, Pass Lake and Montana streams I wouldn't switch back to the 10 footer.
  3. Paaka Member

    Posts: 31
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    Trout-
    thanks for the reply.
    when you say it "almost made it more difficult to throw heavy streamers" are you saying you felt you lost accuracy because of the 10 ft rod or it required more effort to throw heavy streamers because of the 10 ft rod? Have you ever tried a 9'6" rod and if yes how would you compare it to throwing a 10 ft rod?
    Thanks again
  4. troutdopemagic Active Member

    Posts: 408
    Lake Stevens, Washington
    Ratings: +134 / 0
    Accuracy wasn't an issue but I felt like the extra foot made it require more effort to turn over big streamers especially at a distance. The rod felt a little softer overall, and the fast action is really what you need, if the rod isn't fast enough for the job, you open up a whole can of worms.
  5. sopflyfisher Active Member

    Posts: 739
    Where the fish are located
    Ratings: +448 / 0
    longer rods will make casting heavy stuff feel heavier. even lighter stuff feels heavier. you are holding the short end of a longer lever. that said i like a 10 for throwing steamers, not all the time but much of the time. my favorite in my quiver is an older sage fli 710. it also single hand spey casts well being a ten.
  6. Steel Will New Member

    Posts: 22
    Portland, OR
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    If you think you might be doing some speycasting later, I'd get a 10' rod. I think the ability to cast large streamers is more influenced by rod weight designation, line choice, tippet size, and casting ability than rod length. What's your reasoning behind wanting a longer rod? I have a Scott S4 9'6" and I've cast some pretty big bugs with it. A longer rod would allow you to lift out/roll cast sinking lines more easily and would also let you have better line control through mending.
  7. Paaka Member

    Posts: 31
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    Thanks for all the help guys.
    My situation is I live in MO and end up fishing the White River in Arkansas for big browns with a intermediate sinking line and 5-6 ips sink tip throwing 6-8 inch streamer patterns. The reason I was debating a longer rod was due to the fact that I travel to central/northern Michigan to fish for steelhead twice a year and most guides up there are now fishing longer rods. I was hoping to track down a 7wt that would be as close to ideal for both in the same rod (may be asking too much out of the rod).
    I will most likely be using it more for streamer fishing in MO/Arkansas than Michigan.
    I was mainly hoping to get everyone's opinion on those rods if they had a chance to fish them as well as determine if a 10 footer would be detrimental to streamer fishing with heavy sink tips and 8 inch streamer patterns.
    Again, thanks for everyone's input.
  8. Rob Allen Active Member

    Posts: 919
    Vancouver WA
    Ratings: +371 / 0
    hmmm I don't mean to second guess your thinking but given the tips and size of flies you are talking about I think you should be looking at 8 wts.. 8" streamers... maybe even a 9 weight.
  9. Paaka Member

    Posts: 31
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    Actually I already have an 8wt and was looking into a 7wt to have a second rod ready to go with a streamer in the boat, likely a 6 inch streamer (and light steelheading).
    I had read that the loomis nrx, sage method, sage one were pretty powerful fast action rods and assumed they could handle the sinking line and streamer size in a 7wt but wanted to see if anyone had experience fishing theses rods and get their opinion.
  10. Red Arch Active Member

    Posts: 158
    Lower Mainland or Interior of BC
    Ratings: +35 / 0
    Yellowstone anglers did their 2014 8# shootout, the sage method 7# got fourth when overlined with an 8# line.

    Sent from my SGH-T989D using Tapatalk
  11. Salmo_g Active Member

    Posts: 7,491
    Your City ,State
    Ratings: +1,626 / 0
    Paaka,

    I wouldn't look for one rod for the dual purposes of large trout/steelhead and bonefishing. Rod choice for bonefish is all about casting in the wind, with fish size and flies being the secondary consideration. (I have 6, 7, and 8 wt rods for bonefish.) For the half-chicken-sized trout flies that you're tossing and fast sinking tips, a switch or mini-Spey seems like a better tool for the job.

    BTW, I ran in to an angler on the river yesterday who had a new Sage Method 9' 8 wt. It's an amazingly light rod, but for the fast sink tip and large fly application that you refer to, I would not choose it.

    Sg
  12. Paaka Member

    Posts: 31
    Ratings: +4 / 0
    Sg-
    Thanks for the recommendation.
    In regards to the sage method...what did you not like about it for streamer fishing? Not enough power? Not enough feel to the rod?
    Thanks again
  13. Salmo_g Active Member

    Posts: 7,491
    Your City ,State
    Ratings: +1,626 / 0
    Paaka,

    I think the Sage Method has plenty of power. It's the size of the streamers you use. My single hand 8 wts are older and heavier than the Method, and I don't care to cast large flies on rods even as light as mine. Had I never tried 2-handed rods I never would have known that casting large streamers could be so easy.

    If it's true that it takes mass to cast mass, then casting larger streamers gets a lot easier with the heavy line of either a heavy wt single hand rod, or using a 2-handed rod. I have a Sage RPL 810-2, and like with any of my 8 wts, I'd druther not cast steelhead flies larger than size 2. But I'm comfortable casting 3/0 streamers, even weighted ones, with my 7 wt Spey rod.

    Side note about the Method, if it were mine, I'd never take the reel off, ya' know, to keep some weight on it so it doesn't float away.

    Sg