Sick to my stomach to see my favorite restaurant serving wild steelhead

TC

I live with wind knots
#1
While dining at my favorite italian restaurant with some out of town friends, I was extremely saddened to look up at the board and see posted, Special, Wild Steelhead. I didn't want to make a scene with my friends there so afterwards, when I got home, I emailed the restaurant a nice letter and asking them to stop this and visit a couple of sites to educate themselves on this depleting resource. To date I have not received a response. I will go in there to talk with them personally this week, and if not met with a satisfactory response, I will tell all of you the name of the restaurant and hope we can pressure them into stopping this immediately. Deal?
 
#3
I hope they listen to your requests, but the suppliers have been doing a good job of preparing them for backlash. I'll do my part in exposing them if they seem to not listen to you.
 
#5
One of two things. Either they are really serving wild Steelhead, (if they are, I hope you can prevent them from continuing) or they are just hyping the product as wild to sell and make more money off of their uneducated clientele.
 

Josh

dead in the water
#6
I always wonder how many "wild" claims you read are actually meaning "not hatchery". After all, a fish that lives in a river is "wild" to a lot of people. Even people like chefs who should know better.
 

Chris Bellows

Your Preferred WFF Poster
#7
I always wonder how many "wild" claims you read are actually meaning "not hatchery".
with the current state of non-selective fisheries, does it really matter if the actual fish you are served has a clipped fin? how many wild fish were killed for that one clipped fish?

a restaurant serving any steelhead should feel the wrath.
 
#10
I always wonder how many "wild" claims you read are actually meaning "not hatchery". After all, a fish that lives in a river is "wild" to a lot of people. Even people like chefs who should know better.
Hatchery vs wild doesn't matter. The fisheries are non selective, and they harvest every fish that runs in to those nets. Furthermore, we've all heard of all the studies showing the harm hatchery fish do on wild populations. Those hatchery fish that they pump in to the rivers that are replacing the native fish are how the tribes can market wild caught steelhead as "sustainable."
 

ribka

Active Member
#11
Let us know the outcome.

I did the same a year ago and spoke to a restaurant owner re serving wild steelhead. His response was they were caught by natives ( tribal members) and he thought he was justified serving wild fish if netted by natives. I told him no longer have my business. Good luck
 

dflett68

Active Member
#12
I always wonder how many "wild" claims you read are actually meaning "not hatchery". After all, a fish that lives in a river is "wild" to a lot of people. Even people like chefs who should know better.
in the marketing of anything, most certainly food, bullshit is the order of the day. if a critter has lived several years in the wide ocean fending for itself well enough to reach adulthood, it doesn't matter where it was born or how many fins it has - it's wild. in fact, i'm sure that for food marketing purposes "not raised in a pen" probably qualifies as wild. the odds are that it's a mix of both native and hatchery fish.

any which way, merchants are going to do whatever is legal, at minimum.
 

Richard E

Active Member
#13
in fact, i'm sure that for food marketing purposes "not raised in a pen" probably qualifies as wild. the odds are that it's a mix of both native and hatchery fish.

any which way, merchants are going to do whatever is legal, at minimum.
That's a great call, particularly when the supplier is tribal.
 

Josh

dead in the water
#14
with the current state of non-selective fisheries, does it really matter if the actual fish you are served has a clipped fin? how many wild fish were killed for that one clipped fish?

a restaurant serving any steelhead should feel the wrath.
Hatchery vs wild doesn't matter. The fisheries are non selective, and they harvest every fish that runs in to those nets. Furthermore, we've all heard of all the studies showing the harm hatchery fish do on wild populations. Those hatchery fish that they pump in to the rivers that are replacing the native fish are how the tribes can market wild caught steelhead as "sustainable."
Yes yes, I know. I wasn't posting to debate hatcheries, just more to wonder what sort of understanding these places had when making a statement like that. I have a lot less sympathy for a place that doesn't understand the real issues with hatcheries than I do with a place that purposefully serves actual "wild" fish. I'm not saying that the restaurant shouldn't be pressured to stop serving even hatchery fish, I was just more musing about what they meant. Confusion doesn't help us explain the issue properly to the public or to businesses.
 

Josh

dead in the water
#15
in the marketing of anything, most certainly food, bullshit is the order of the day. if a critter has lived several years in the wide ocean fending for itself well enough to reach adulthood, it doesn't matter where it was born or how many fins it has - it's wild. in fact, i'm sure that for food marketing purposes "not raised in a pen" probably qualifies as wild. the odds are that it's a mix of both native and hatchery fish.

any which way, merchants are going to do whatever is legal, at minimum.
I agree, marketing is 99% BS. My curiosity in this particular situation is more if the BS is intentional, based on lies, or just out of ignorance.

However, if we are being technical, I'm sure you Evan and Chris are correct about the fish being served probably being a mix of whatever gets caught in the nets.