Cabelas fiberglass rods

#16
Trevor,

It has been awhile since I cast the FF806, but on my 7.5 5/6, how can I say this without sounding stupid and that's hard for me. It will handle both great; I am using the RIO Grand in both, the 5wt to me works best, loads the rod both long and short casts. The 6wt is great for 2 false casts and let shoot for good distance, quick pick up and get fishing again.

I was with my brother last year on the Yak, using a 4wt (all I had at time) rod still worked fine and I was casting the whole line out with no problem. Little light 20-30ft, but once you got the full taper out, lots of power in the rod, only thing I did not like was the size of the handle, just a little to big for me, so I sanded down just alittle and now it fits beautiful!

Hope this helps

William
 
#17
I know nothing of their fly rods, glass or otherwise. But for those that are just beginning a journey into the addiction of fly casting and fishing, remember, before Graphite and Boron, there was Fiberglass.
I would council that if you can master the slower action and loop control of the fiberglass, the other more advanced technology will be a bonus to you.
One of the benefits that I found with fiberglass is that it teach the valuable lesson of patients. If you can WAIT for the rod to load, your cast will be better and more distant. Everybody that begins fly fishing wants to cast to the far corner of the world, until they realize that the fish are not over there all of the time.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#18
My first fly rod was a Fiberglass one. But that was a llllooooonnnnnggggg time ago. I was about 25 then, I'm 77 now. It was a 6wt I know and maybe an 8'6" rod.. I never tried to hit the other bank with as I always knew that the fish were behind me as I always waded out to far.
 

Blue

Active Member
#20
I haven't bought this one yet but did buy the Eagle Claw "Feather Weight" Fiberglass and love it. Very old timey looking with a ruler on the lower portion of the rod just above the winding check. Yellow blank and brown wraps and the Eagle Claw emblem in the handle. Sorry to get off track

There is no comparison with the Cabela's (or any other rod) with those $14. I have one as well. It is a terrible caster, but it has a nice bend. Mine the guides are HUGE and a couple shy and that is the way they are made. I only use it for deep nymhing because like I said, casts like crap.
BUT, the Cabela's are Awesome! Beautiful rods really and my cork is just fine as well. I have the 6'6" 4 wt.


As far as LEARNING on a glass rod. I am all for that. It teaches one to slow down and wait for it. Like mentioned, if you master a slow action rod, the rest is cake.
 
#21
Another benifit(?) of this addiction is that the rod and reel builders keep changing the models and technology. If you start out with a perfectly good and serviceable rod and reel and even line, the makers will change the rules and you will be left thinking that your equipment is yesterday's left over soup. The fact that is has served you well since you bought it is moot.
You need and must have the latest and greatest(?) model.
Case in point, this is the reason that I have six fly rods, six fly reels, and eight spare spools, all with line.

And I still can't catch a fish. :D
 

kmac

Active Member
#22
I got the 6'6" 4 wt at Cabelas after Christmas sale. It's my 1st fiberglass rod and the slow action seems very "noodley" after using a moderate/fast action graphite rod. It's taking a while to get used to this slower action rod, but I look forward to using it on smaller streams this summer/fall. I got mine on sale for $99, so if you can pick one up for $75 it's a great deal.
 

Lugan

Joe Streamer
#23
Kmac, stick with it. Once you adapt your casting stroke to that rod, you may never look back. Starting just short of a decade ago I was all graphite. Now I have three-fourths of my rods in modern glass, and just a few of the very longest rods in graphite. I even use 6wt and 7wt glass rods to fish big streamers for big fish in smaller waters. It's a very versatile and fishable material.
 

Blue

Active Member
#24
Kmac, stick with it. Once you adapt your casting stroke to that rod, you may never look back. Starting just short of a decade ago I was all graphite. Now I have three-fourths of my rods in modern glass, and just a few of the very longest rods in graphite. I even use 6wt and 7wt glass rods to fish big streamers for big fish in smaller waters. It's a very versatile and fishable material.

Not to mention, don't break off as much. The tip of the rod does all the work. You are my new hero.;-)
 

Lugan

Joe Streamer
#25
Not to mention, don't break off as much. The tip of the rod does all the work. You are my new hero.;-)
Yeah, that too! And they are more durable than any other material, and the fight is a lot more fun than with a graphite stick. Lots of upside and little downside for glass rods in mid-lengths and shorter, 7wt and below.
 
#26
I picked up the 7ft. 4/5wt awhile back and finally got it out on the pond to try it out. I used a 4wt delta taper. Really have never felt this delicate of a dry fly presentation before. Very impressed for a $75 rod. My first fiberglass rod, and I love the feel.
 

fly-by

Active Member
#29
Just got the 7'6" 6wt yesterday as a specialty rod for big fly/big fish/tight quarters. Lawn cast with 4 different lines on it to see what it likes best, and notice that it is accepting of a much wider range of lines than my modern rods. It's definitely fast for a glass rod and pretty damp too. Plan to fish it with a 7wt for streamers and 6wt for hopper/dropper, etc. Fit and finish is really good for a $99 rod.
 

Lugan

Joe Streamer
#30
Just got the 7'6" 6wt yesterday as a specialty rod for big fly/big fish/tight quarters. Lawn cast with 4 different lines on it to see what it likes best, and notice that it is accepting of a much wider range of lines than my modern rods. It's definitely fast for a glass rod and pretty damp too. Plan to fish it with a 7wt for streamers and 6wt for hopper/dropper, etc. Fit and finish is really good for a $99 rod.
...and I know where you are going to fish that rod! Glass rods almost always accept a wider range of fly lines. It's just the nature of that material.