Oars Revisited....

#1
I didn't see this discussed in the last year so I'll throw it out there...You guys with 10" Maxxon's or other 10-11' tubes...what are you finding to be the best oars in 7 1/2 or 8'. I think were sort of in no-man's- land here as far as oars. We don't have "toy boats" and not full size river cats/rafts either. For the 10' 'toon I'm building with the Maxxons, it feels like the standard Cataracts and Carlisles are just to heavy. Overkill on a lake for sure and maybe even for whitewater. I've found two oars that seem like good possible options. One is the Cataract Mini-mag oar. It looks like they don't come in 8' but only 7 1/2. A guy over at a "famous" Portland store told me they've had lots of problems with the blades. They just won't take a beating. The other oar is by The Creek Company. They come in 7' or 8'. I saw some at Cabela's here in Boise and they are 7' so they won't work for me. I wish they did. They're on sale for $33/ea. They look like a pretty strong oar. They're 3-piece which wouldn't be my first choice but they still look OK. They're lighter than the C's and C's mentioned above. It doesn't look like Cabela's carries them anymore but you can order from the Creek Company. Someone told me they thought Carlisle made them.

Any ideas?
 
#2
I have the 1018 Creek Company boat. I had a lot of problems with the toons so I bought some Maxxon toons for it. These are only a half inch bigger around but that dimension is sustained along the tube. This had me sitting much higher out of the water than the CC toons. I ended up putting 1' extensions on the oars I had, bringing them to 9'. Worked out much better.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#3
I've always used 8' oars on my 9 and 10' boats. Currently running 8' cataracts on my 10' steelheader with custom frame. Used it on lakes and rivers. It comes down to how much oar you can handle. That long oar with REALLY scoot you across a lake with ease.
 

PT

Physhicist
#4
I used the 7.5' mini-mags on my 10' Skookum. That would be my suggestion. The 8' and longer oars are thicker shaft and heavier in the hands. As you can see, 3 replies and 3 different suggestions. Of course, I don't mind being right..... again. ;)



Edit to add: I've had a couple different pair of mini-mags that I beat the snot out of and they held up just fine.
 

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#10
The only reason that you might not want the cataract mini-magnums is that the blade size is not the same as the magnums. I like the mini magnums on solo boats. I've got some in 7.5 if you would like to try them. Don't let those "large hand" guys fool you, the narrow shaft is as stout as you will ever need and much lighter than the larger diameter bigger oars like the Cataract SSG' (which I run on my 14' and 14'9" inflatable boats.
 
#11
Hey thanks for the "test run" offer you guys. I may like to try them out. My frame is not finished yet and so it may be a couple weeks. I'm also not sure whether I'll need 7.5's or 8's. PT and Ed...are you guys both in the Boise area? I'm a "large hand" guy but the SSG's feel too big to me, especially for the 10' 'toon.
 

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#12
Unfortunately both PT and I live in the greater Puget Sound area. Maybe a reason for someone to take a road trip? Have you considered the Sawyer oars called "power stroke" made for Scadden? http://www.northforkoutdoors.com/2012catalog/page17.html Small diameter shafted oars, 7'8" in length, concave blade that pulls really nice in the water. I have a set of the Power Stroke oars too, I like them a lot. A close second to my Cataract mini magnums.
 
#13
Well, I checked out the power stroke. Definitely out of my price range. Do you feel like the blades on the Mini-magnums are built well enough? Are they solid plastic? They look from the photos like they might be "filled" with something. Injected? Will they take a good beating on the rocky bottoms. I know a lot of times I've found myself trying to row in 12" of water and it can be hard on oar blades.
 

PT

Physhicist
#14
The mini-mags are an upgrade to just about any oar on the market. You can beat the hell out of those things and all you'll see are some scuffs on the blade. I don't just dig rock and gravel with mine. In some of the real tight spots they are used to push, pull, stop, using exposed rocks to get me thru the boney sections. There may be a better oar of that size out there but I don't know what it is.

.02

My last word on this. I'm not saying the 7.5's are better than any other length. They worked for me. The longer oars were fine when rowing but heavy in the hand when holding them out of the water for any period of time. If you can borrow a set of each before buying you'd be money ahead.
 

Ed Call

Well-Known Member
#15
The mini-mags are an upgrade to just about any oar on the market. You can beat the hell out of those things and all you'll see are some scuffs on the blade. I don't just dig rock and gravel with mine. In some of the real tight spots they are used to push, pull, stop, using exposed rocks to get me thru the boney sections. There may be a better oar of that size on the market but I don't know what it is.

.02
Stop the presses! I totally agree with PT on this one. My mini-magnums have seen their share of rock banging, pushing and clanging with very good results. I have not had the Power Strokes long enough to bang them about on rocks. Unsure they will outperform the cataracts, I consider the cataracts very stout and capable of taking anything you'll throw at them. (I'm not a hard core whitewater guy, but everything I've rowed has been quite easy with the cataracts)