Rigging Tube flies so you don't lose them when you break off the hook.

Paul Huffman

Driven by irrational exuberance.
#31
The other problem with power pro or other trailing hook line is.. it is too limp. (just my opinion) The hook bounces and bobs, twists, and flops around back there, and doesn't really swim true. I guess I don't like leaving it up to chance on where that hook is when a fish hits. I like to know it is swimming correctly down or up and not in some random fashion. I like using tubes where I can tie a loop and then have the knot of the loop pull into the tube or have the tube stop the knot from coming up. ( mainly frodin tube material and now protube's nano tubes and even the flexitubes). This way you have a more rigid trailer using the stiffer mono in the loop that swims better and more consistent.
I use 30# Fireline for the dropper loop on shanks and it seems to be "Goldilocks" for stiffness.

I've heard from other tubers that they like the way they can position the hook up or down. However, I was never convinced that the hook stays positioned all the way through a swing with just a pair of lead eyes for geotaxsis.

Also, it takes me a couple times to get the loop size correct on a tube stream side. I suppose I could get better with practice. Too many times I just saw "that's close enough!" and cast with the hook flopping well beyond the junction tube. I've caught fish that way too.
 

Jerry Daschofsky

Moderator
Staff member
#32
Jerry,
you're right, typically the fly goes with the hook when it's broken off, because the tube fly itself is wedged in rocks, etc. The idea is that if just the hook is caught, buried into a log or something where the tube is not affected, you can break the hook off, but the tube manages to stay on the leader. This way you can lose just hooks, and not the tube that they fly is tied onto. I've been doing this for a while, pegging the tube with a toothpick, and when just the hook is caught, i do get the tube back, but typically, if i'm breaking the line, I'm breaking off the whole kit because the tube itself is jammed into boulders on the bottom.
Trust me, I lose a lot of flies too. I'm from the school of "If you're not losing gear, you're not deep enough" LOL. They're just so cheap to tie up, I don't worry about it. For me, I just string up a new one and away we go. And like you, most of the time I'm jammed at the tube too.

Yup, a few of us are switching to worm weights. Beau Mac now has weighted cheaters. So get an eggy look and cool colors and a variety of weights to boot.
 
#34
Trust me, I lose a lot of flies too. I'm from the school of "If you're not losing gear, you're not deep enough" LOL. They're just so cheap to tie up, I don't worry about it. For me, I just string up a new one and away we go. And like you, most of the time I'm jammed at the tube too.

Yup, a few of us are switching to worm weights. Beau Mac now has weighted cheaters. So get an eggy look and cool colors and a variety of weights to boot.
With Tiemco 7989 hooks at upward of 16 bucks a pack, I'll be fishing tubes... I can get short shank hooks for a lot less than that. I don't fish tubes all the time, but on rivers with a really grabby bottom, like the spots I fish on vancouver island, I prefer them.

I also like the ability to change hooks out for different fishing conditions. When I know there will be a lot of resident fish, especially smaller dollies and trout in the warm summer months, I scale down the hook I run off the back of the tube so I don't injure those smaller fish.

Weighted cheaters, huh???
 

TallFlyGuy

Adipossessed!
#36
I use 30# Fireline for the dropper loop on shanks and it seems to be "Goldilocks" for stiffness.

I've heard from other tubers that they like the way they can position the hook up or down. However, I was never convinced that the hook stays positioned all the way through a swing with just a pair of lead eyes for geotaxsis.

Also, it takes me a couple times to get the loop size correct on a tube stream side. I suppose I could get better with practice. Too many times I just saw "that's close enough!" and cast with the hook flopping well beyond the junction tube. I've caught fish that way too.
For keeping it to ride straight you need to have some sort of "rudder". Arctic fox or something similar works great, as well as a rabbit strip. For measuring, I lay the tube on my hand on my middle finger. I line up the tube with my middle crease in my middle finger and measure from there to the end of my finger, and then seeing how long I need it, I then tie my loop the same size as what is needed. The loops usually measure from first crease to second crease or just past on my middle finger. Not sure if that makes sense visually.
 

TallFlyGuy

Adipossessed!
#37
I was also going to say... IF you want to get your flies back, use the bobber stop method. Then use a loop knot that breaks well under 100%. If you use 15lb maxima, and use a perfection loop, I think you are effectively fishing 10-12lb fishing strength with the perfection loop. The loop on a perfection loop breaks well under 100%, and 9 times out of 10 will break right at the knot itself.