Spring Stillwater

#1
I'm still a pretty new fly angler, it's tough to find time to fish as much as I would like. I live in the Monroe area and I'm looking for some suggestions for stillwater patterns to use this time of year. I was out at Lake Tye, really just to cast on actual water, but I think I might catch something if I just used the right pattern. I tired foam beetles, some little nymphs, and an olive woolly bugger. Not even a nibble. Maybe it's still too cold?
 

Scott Salzer

previously micro brew
#2
Basic would be black, olive, black/olive woolley bugger / leeches, same in Hale Bopps. Hare's ear, pheasant tails, damsel nymphs should be part of the fly box. Dries are iffy unless you happen to be in a hatch - not the time of year for foam beetles. Trout do most of their feeding under the water so I would stick with that for now. Most of the hatches this time of year would be midges, some emergers may work if you get into a hatch of those.

You didn't mention the type of line you are using, I would recommend a type IV or V full sink.

You just have to stick with it.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#3
Starting out, try to keep it simple.
Tie on a bugger and cast it out. Troll around for a bit, then stop and strip it in. Change your stripping speed it you aren't getting bit. Repeat....
This will do two things for you, allow you to cover more water as well as let you work on your casting skills.
If you aren't getting hits, tie a couple of feet of tippet off the bend of the bugger and tie on a smaller fly behind it, like a soft hackle, hairs ear, zug bug, San Juan worm etc.
Sometimes the larger fly will work as an attractor and they'll end up eating the smaller fly.
Good luck,
SF
 
#6
Thanks for the advice. I have a sinking line but wasn't using it from the bank. I will try the sinking line next time. I will tie up a batch of these Green Carey's Specials. The beetle was a long shot being so early but I have seen some in the yard already so I gave it a shot.
 

Preston

Active Member
#8
I don't know if It would qualify as a green Carey but one of my long-time favorites for early spring stillwaters has always been the Sixpack. Karl Haufler's pattern debuted at Pass Lake sometime in the sixties where, on the day it was introduced, it seemed to be the only game in town. Other anglers appealed to him to beg, borrow or steal an example so he came up with the simple barter arrangement which gave the fly its name. The fly is, essentially, a self-bodied Carey; that is, a Carey Special with a body made of s phesasant rump feather twisted into a rope and wrapped up the hook shank and finished off with a pheasant rump hackle. The difference lies in the use of yellow-dyed pheasant rump. The normal green-gray pheasant feather, when dyed yellow takes on a golden olive color while retaining its greenish iridescence. I usually finish it off with a rib of copper wire to make the body a bit more durable.
1-DSCF3485.JPG
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#10
I remember buying 6-Packs from Tom Darling at The Avid Angler when I first started flyfishing.
Excellent pattern then and still excellent today.
 

WA-Fly

Active Member
#11
Try lake tye this weekend with a sinking line and leeches at the north end of the lake. There are a lot of bass in there and they will be planting trout in the lake soon. It gets fished out within a week of the planting.
 
#12
I don't know if It would qualify as a green Carey but one of my long-time favorites for early spring stillwaters has always been the Sixpack. Karl Haufler's pattern debuted at Pass Lake sometime in the sixties where, on the day it was introduced, it seemed to be the only game in town. Other anglers appealed to him to beg, borrow or steal an example so he came up with the simple barter arrangement which gave the fly its name. The fly is, essentially, a self-bodied Carey; that is, a Carey Special with a body made of s phesasant rump feather twisted into a rope and wrapped up the hook shank and finished off with a pheasant rump hackle. The difference lies in the use of yellow-dyed pheasant rump. The normal green-gray pheasant feather, when dyed yellow takes on a golden olive color while retaining its greenish iridescence. I usually finish it off with a rib of copper wire to make the body a bit more durable.
View attachment 26166
I love that pattern, one of my favorites. I learned to tie it a little differently than the way you describe it, but I imagine the effectiveness is identical. I tie it with a tail of yellow died pheasant tail that then becomes the self-bodied portion, counter-wrapped with copper wire and finished off with a yellow died pheasant rump hackle.

The natural colored ones work really well too.
 
#14
My mom was visiting a cousin in Oak Harbor a couple weeks ago so I sent her into the hardware store and she bought the last 2 packs of that chenille! Looks like I'm in the money for a bit and everyone else will be searching to no avail for it.
 

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
#15
I think most streamers or stillwater stripped flies are more effective if there is some soft hackle or something up the front end of the fly that busts up the streamlined shape and is both visual and more motile/vibratory. Lately I have been reversing the bead heads so the big hole faces the eye, the little hole the shank, like a tiny open mouth that hoepfully creates a little bit more turbulance and noise. Similar argument for dumbbell eyes. You want that lateral line of the fish you are after going nuts with signals to the fish brain.... "crush that thing now"