Call of the wild

#31
Perhaps not all, yet many i meet are always asking about my time in the woods then they tell me a harrowing story of life, death, and a dead bear. Then they tell me how crazy i am cause I'm in cougar country without a gun. That sounds like a person full of fear to me. I mean God forbid a walk in the woods be any more dangerous than the walk to the corner Starbucks. I mean i got a pocket knife, its not like I'm unarmed.
Or, someone who doesn't want you around. Ever tell someone walking into your favorite honey hole that the fishing there isn't very good; nothin' but dinks...
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#32
Perhaps not all, yet many i meet are always asking about my time in the woods then they tell me a harrowing story of life, death, and a dead bear. Then they tell me how crazy i am cause I'm in cougar country without a gun. That sounds like a person full of fear to me. I mean God forbid a walk in the woods be any more dangerous than the walk to the corner Starbucks. I mean i got a pocket knife, its not like I'm unarmed.
I don't think one needs a gun in black bear country but I do feel one is very useful in cougar country. They don't scare as easy as a bear.
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#34
From my viewpoint the worst animal to have in camp is a skunk. You can beat a bear with a stick, shoot it...whatever. But I wouldn't advise beating a skunk with a stick. I spent 25 years backpacking and doing the high cascade deer hunt and the only critters we had issues with was mice and chipmunks. A mouse will put a hole thru a tent or pack in a moment. Bears keep their distance. They might get close enough to stir up horses or dogs... but that's about it.

Wolves are territorial and I don't know how I'd feel about a dog in camp if wolves were in the valley. They just might want to chase that dog out of camp.
 

Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
#35
Or, someone who doesn't want you around. Ever tell someone walking into your favorite honey hole that the fishing there isn't very good; nothin' but dinks...
Just last night I was told about an easily accessible cascade lake with some surprisingly large trout but warned at the same time about a sow and cubs that have taken up residence on the lake shore. While I won't be carrying a gun I will be extra cautious when I visit that lake in the next few weeks.

TC
 

Peyton00

Active Member
#39
Plenty of time even if the handgun is in a pack. Cougars don't attack out of trees like on TV. Hikers aren't deaf nor blind neither.

If one isn't slow fast, claw the handgun out of the pack after the attack and put yourself out of your misery.
If attacked by a cougar and the gun isn't in your hand and held tight, The force from the cougar pouncing on you is going to knock you down and if unlucky knock you OUT. The idea of digging a handgun out of a pack while under attack by a cougar is some funny shit.

Stay home and save your family the heartache of somebody finding some body parts and gear( with a pistol in the pack).
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#40
Yep, skeeters are the worst! Had mice chew a hole in my first mountain tent. Learned right away to leave ZERO food in tent. Never encountered a skunk while camping, fortunately. Did shoot one in the barn when I was a teenager. Seriously stupid that was! Guess who got to do chores morning and night all by himself for two months? Had deer come into camp checking for edibles, but they chase away pretty easy. Bears run off when I holler at them, . . . so far. Haven't used the bear spray or a gun on them yet. Wolves keep their distance and watch me watch them. The cougar that bothers me is the one that I don't know is checking me out. A gun wouldn't be much use in a surprise attack. I'm more concerned with walking up on a remote meth lab than I am about wild animals. Other than skeeters, of course.

Sg
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#41
WDFW is aware of the citizens concerns over the expanding state wolf populations.
They are doing a feasibility study of triploid wolf introductions, which would likely solve all wolf related problems mentioned in previous WFF wolf threads.
The other option is to plant diploid wolves and have selective harvest seasons for tail clipped only wolves.
 

Krusty

Active Member
#43
I have spent some time around wolves in Alaska (once had 4 of them trot by me sitting in the brush...close enough I could see their eyes dilate when they finally saw me...they were far more frightened by the encounter than I was, and scrambled off in a blur of speed). They're hardly the equivalent of a T. Rex.

Wolf attacks on humans are exceedingly rare...even where they exist in large populations.

The main group I think has a moderately legitimate gripe about the reintroduction of wolves are stockman who run open range operations (I'm not too keen on those fellas either...they overgraze public lands and do a pathetic job of maintaining the fences that keep them from beating the shit out of public waters).

Since a lot of prople want wolves (mostly city-slickers who have the political power to legislate their will), I think we ought to have a pretty easy process to facilitate repayment for stock losses that have even a slight appearance of wolf predation....that way, even the small number of people actually negatively impacted by their reintroduction will quit whining about it.
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#44
I have no problem reimbursing ranchers for lost livestock to wolves, but not if the livestock is free ranging and not contained within a fenced enclosure.

I don't want my tax dollars going to someone who allows his cattle to roam free in wolf country. The wolf doesn't know the difference between a cow and an elk if it's wandering through the forest.

I'm not a fan of free range ranching anyway so I have a problem with any claims in regards to cattle lost to wolves if the cattle are wandering around public lands.
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#45
I have spent some time around wolves in Alaska (once had 4 of them trot by me sitting in the brush...close enough I could see their eyes dilate when they finally saw me...they were far more frightened by the encounter than I was, and scrambled off in a blur of speed). They're hardly the equivalent of a T. Rex.

Wolf attacks on humans are exceedingly rare...even where they exist in large populations.

The main group I think has a moderately legitimate gripe about the reintroduction of wolves are stockman who run open range operations (I'm not too keen on those fellas either...they overgraze public lands and do a pathetic job of maintaining the fences that keep them from beating the shit out of public waters).

Since a lot of prople want wolves (mostly city-slickers who have the political power to legislate their will), I think we ought to have a pretty easy process to facilitate repayment for stock losses that have even a slight appearance of wolf predation....that way, even the small number of people actually negatively impacted by their reintroduction will quit whining about it.

Krusty sounds like a good screen name for you. If you still hunted you'd be amongst the bunch of whiners (your words).

If the deer and elk aren't eaten by wolves the survivors will be very skittish. I hunted moose up in Alberta one year and while I saw moose and wolves I only heard deer. Snap a stick while walking and the deer would spook.