8wt sink tip line question

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Ryan Higgins, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. Ryan Higgins Active Member

    Posts: 303
    East Wenatchee, WA
    Ratings: +33 / 0
    Looking at picking up a new 8wt single hand combo for Steelhead. I'm thinking of going with a Sage Approach 8wt rod and a Lamson Litespeed 3x reel. Looking at 8wt sink tip lines I'm not sure what rate of sink to get. I mainly fish the Wenatchee, Methow, and Sky rivers. I'm thinking a 6" per second sink would be ideal, get the fly down to the desired depth of around 6-9' or deeper quick so I have my fly in the strike zone near the bottom for the majority of my run, but I'm a total noob when it comes to this. What is the consensus on this? What is everyone else using. Looking specifically at the Scientific Angler Mastery Wet Tip lines. Trying to buy the whole package from one local source (Pacific Fly Fishers to be exact). I wont be going 2 hander as I don't feel my casting ability is up to it. I want to try and double this rod as a bass rod as well, but the top priority is Steelhead. Thanks!
  2. Evan Virnoche Guest

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    15 feet t10 and 15 intermediete sink tip
  3. jake-e-boy Active Member

    Posts: 449
    Kennewick
    Ratings: +202 / 0
    Wenatchee sucks with a single hand rod. I would highly suggest going 2h for Wenatchee and meth, hell sky too
  4. Ryan Higgins Active Member

    Posts: 303
    East Wenatchee, WA
    Ratings: +33 / 0
    It's a learning curve. I fully plan on going 2h in the future, I just know my skill level isn't there yet. I also fish from a drift boat 70% of the time on these rivers so distance isn't huge.
  5. Salmo_g Active Member

    Posts: 7,472
    Your City ,State
    Ratings: +1,615 / 0
    Alpine4x4,

    Nothing wrong in choosing a single hand rod for steelheading. Sheesh, we used them effectively for decades until 2-handers became the steelheading fashion statement of the 90s. Fish what you can use well.

    I don't know diddly about the Sage Approach line, but I think a 9 1/2' 8 wt is about the perfect all around single hand steelhead rod choice. In addition to a floating line, I think a 15' type 6 sink tip would be the most all around choice for sunk fly work. A lightly weighted fly will fish the same depth as a type 3 fishing an unweighted fly, so you can easily cover all the holding water that is fly fishable.

    I don't know if the perfect steelhead rod is also a great choice for bass fishing.

    Sg
  6. Ryan Higgins Active Member

    Posts: 303
    East Wenatchee, WA
    Ratings: +33 / 0
    OK, lets see if I understand this. Seems to be the consensus is to get a floating line and run different sinking tips instead of a full on sinking tip line?

    Thanks so far guys.
  7. PT Physhicist

    Posts: 3,544
    Edmonds, WA
    Ratings: +715 / 2
    A standard sink tip of 6" per second isn't going to get you down 6-9' in any moving water. Most people would be quite surprised how shallow they are actually fishing with their tips. Look up how to make your own shooting head, as you can take a standard weight forward 8wt floating line and chop 15' or so off the front, build a loop in your line, and attach different tips for different water conditions. Or, just buy a versi tip system.

    You don't need a 2 hander to fish steelhead. Learn how to fish a single handed 8wt and you'll be miles ahead of the guys fishing far out lies quite poorly.
    Kent Lufkin likes this.
  8. o mykiss Active Member

    Posts: 1,303
    .
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    Although there are some advantages (i.e., castability) of a true sink tip line (i.e., a line where the sinking tip is integrated with the floating part of the line) when compared to a multi-tip system (i.e, where there is a loop at the end of the floating part of the line to which you can attach a floating tip or a variety of sink tips), I personally would go with a multi-tip system. I think you'll at the very least want the ability to fish a full floating line, so you're likely going to end up with at least two lines - a floater and a sink tip line - which means you need to carry to separate spools (or reels). I also think you'd be better off not limiting limit yourself to a type 6 sinktip, as that will be too much sink for some water you'll want to fish. With a multi-tip system, you'll get a floater, an intermediate sink tip, a type 3 sink tip and usually a type 6. That would allow you to cover virtually any situation you might encounter. It's easier to change out a tip than to have to change spools (or reels). And unless you're really going to fish only one line, going with a multi-tip system is way cheaper than having a bunch of spools (or reels) lined with full integrated floating and sink tip lines.
  9. jake-e-boy Active Member

    Posts: 449
    Kennewick
    Ratings: +202 / 0
    Airflo makes a Poly Leader sinktip with a loop connection in 10' and 14'

    I suggest the "Extra Super Fast Sinking" one for Wenatchee and other fast moving waters. What I was using on my 1h this past weekend
  10. Ryan Higgins Active Member

    Posts: 303
    East Wenatchee, WA
    Ratings: +33 / 0

    OK awesome explanation. Much appreciated. What is a good multi tip system? I see a lot of them for spey rods, but there doesnt seem to be a whole lot for single hand rods. Can I build my own out of shooting lines, running lines, etc?
  11. jake-e-boy Active Member

    Posts: 449
    Kennewick
    Ratings: +202 / 0
    Rio VersiTip II system is what you want
  12. Old Man Just an Old Man

    Posts: 21,601
    Dillon, Mt
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    I second this answer. You get four tips with this line. It costs a little more but it gets you covered.
  13. Evan Virnoche Guest

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    Ratings: +0 / 0
    rio versitip type 2 system, i have 2 they work great for singlers
  14. Ryan Higgins Active Member

    Posts: 303
    East Wenatchee, WA
    Ratings: +33 / 0
    Thanks guys, should I use the same line weight as the rod or overline? This helped out immensely.
  15. jake-e-boy Active Member

    Posts: 449
    Kennewick
    Ratings: +202 / 0
    if funds are not an issue get both and decide for yourself

    edit: because user and rod play a big part and idk what your rod is like or what you prefer
  16. PT Physhicist

    Posts: 3,544
    Edmonds, WA
    Ratings: +715 / 2
    Match the line weight to your rod.
    Kent Lufkin likes this.
  17. golfman44 Coho Queen

    Posts: 1,638
    Kirkland
    Ratings: +986 / 0
    I found learning to spey cast to be easier than learning to double haul.

    Few hours on YouTube and one day on the water and you'll be able to cast your 2hander and get leader turnover so you're in the game fishing. Not saying you will throw 70ft loops, but you will be fishing just fine and have more line control than a 1 hander
  18. hookedonthefly Active Member

    Posts: 570
    Ratings: +121 / 0
    Also, get a single-hand spey casting lesson...you won't regret it. The Versitip II is indeed the way to go on an 8wt single-hander.

    I'd throw in the idea of a Echo SR 6 wt switch with 8 wt Ambush line...bases covered. Have fun!
    Ed
  19. Ryan Higgins Active Member

    Posts: 303
    East Wenatchee, WA
    Ratings: +33 / 0
    I hate you guys haha, I'm seriously considering nutting up and getting a spey now. Pacific Fly FIshers have some Echo combos all put together for a few bucks cheaper than the 8wt outfit I picked out... Decisions decisions.
  20. jake-e-boy Active Member

    Posts: 449
    Kennewick
    Ratings: +202 / 0
    do it, 11' 8wt would be perfect for Wenatchee and drift boats!