Cascade creeks, where to start?

WA-Fly

Active Member
#16
I can tell you that East Woods Creek north of Monroe is a bust.
I am a semi-noob and Tuesday, I went looking for little blue lines on the map that showed up in the Regs (to know they are open) near to home in Everett, and found that the only place you could get to that piece of water is from the road-bridges that cross it. 6' tall grass, right to the water, and salmon/blackberries mixed in for good measure. Totally unworkable.
As a side, I found Storm and Flowing lake and lots of locals fishing those waters out of little boats. That looks like fun, too....just a different kind of fun. It's fun getting out, even if the pole didn't get raised. :)
I fished woods creek over the weekend and caught a few cutts on dries. I have a friend who owns land on the creek. I just think it would be more fun to hike in some where.
 
#17
Not to hijack the thread, however there are a lot of blue squiggly lines that seem to be bordered by privet land. Short of going door to door in any given area trying to find who owns the property to get permission how does one figure out who own the land on either side of a stream. Do you guys primarily fish in BLM/WDFW/DNR etc. land where access is somewhat predictable or is there a way to find who owns the land around so that they can be contacted for permission.
 

Cruik

Active Member
#18
Not to hijack the thread, however there are a lot of blue squiggly lines that seem to be bordered by privet land. Short of going door to door in any given area trying to find who owns the property to get permission how does one figure out who own the land on either side of a stream. Do you guys primarily fish in BLM/WDFW/DNR etc. land where access is somewhat predictable or is there a way to find who owns the land around so that they can be contacted for permission.


http://www.ecy.wa.gov/services/gis/maps/county/mpl/mplco.htm

This is a good starting point. Honestly, if you're trying to find an access point to one of these rivers, the landowners will let you know where their property is. On a lot of these Cascades creeks, it's going to be NF land everywhere, except where it is private. And even if there is property abutting the river, it's public land up to the median high water mark (in "navigable" waters). So the solution is generally to find public access to the stream and wade up and down as long as you're within the median high water mark (which gives quite a bit of elbow room in mid to late summer).
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#19
Pick a specific river/creek/stream, let's for argument pick the Sauk River. Check the rules for the Sauk and various tributaries and that will give you a starting spot for exploration. If you don't like the Sauk as a name, pick the Skykomish and start from there.
 
G

gldntrt20

Guest
#20
If you find it yourself, it is a better chance of keeping it that way. The more that know about a place, the more chances the experience disappears.
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#21
I have seen some videos and many pictures and reports on small streams in the cascades, I would love to fish some of those creeks. If any one would like to help me out, or point me in the right direction just pm me. Thanks

Aren't you the guy that had that zipperlip lake spot and posted all the pics???
 

WA-Fly

Active Member
#24
Yeah I get it, Okay how about I share one of my favorite spots and maybe some one else might share too.
- Manastash creek, my grandparents used to own property on this creek and it was an awesome trout fishery. They sold the property and I never bothered to look for access any where else on the creek
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
#25
Pick a specific river/creek/stream, let's for argument pick the Sauk River. Check the rules for the Sauk and various tributaries and that will give you a starting spot for exploration. If you don't like the Sauk as a name, pick the Skykomish and start from there.
I've fished all over the Sauk. Both forks and a few of the tribs of both forks. Lots of access up in the hills

Lots of access on the Skykomish. There is more water up in the head waters of the Skykomish that you can shake a stick at. At the right time of the year you can catch just about anything that swims up there. But be sure to read the regs as the N/F has a closed area on it. In the many years of fishing on that river system I think I hit every trib.
 

zen leecher aka bill w

born to work, forced to fish
#27
I've fished all over the Sauk. Both forks and a few of the tribs of both forks. Lots of access up in the hills

Lots of access on the Skykomish. There is more water up in the head waters of the Skykomish that you can shake a stick at. At the right time of the year you can catch just about anything that swims up there. But be sure to read the regs as the N/F has a closed area on it. In the many years of fishing on that river system I think I hit every trib.
Here's some good starting points from OMJ. Check your maps to see what parking spots have close stream access after ensuring those areas are open to fishing. Explore from there. Back when I was a wetsider and into checking out most blue lines I only found a few bad spots. Rest were rated ok, or good. The key thing is checking the regs because of protected chinook and bull trout areas resulting in closed fishing areas.
 
#28
Thanks for the link Cruik. It takes a bit to decipher what all the different colors and shaded areas mean but I think I can figure it out. At least its going to keep me out of trouble for a bit.

R