sharpening your own fly tying scissors?

ScottP

Active Member
#2
Sharpened my thread snips (Wiss knockoffs) by repeatedly cutting through a folded strip of tin foil.

Regards,
Scott
 
#3
sharpen scissors? youre supposed to sharpen scissors? :eek:

20 year old dr slicks and they have never needed sharpening and i cut just about everything including wire with them
 

Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
#4
Sharpened my thread snips (Wiss knockoffs) by repeatedly cutting through a folded strip of tin foil.

Regards,
Scott
I don't understand why this would work to actually sharpen an edge. I can imagine that it would clean off any residue buildup but to sharpen an edge, its not making sense to me.

TC
 

ScottP

Active Member
#5
I don't understand why this would work to actually sharpen an edge. I can imagine that it would clean off any residue buildup but to sharpen an edge, its not making sense to me.

TC
Had my doubts about it, too, but tried it and it worked.

Regards,
Scott
 
#6
from the interweb

Think about the angle at which you sharpen blades. Cutting foil would (if anything) work at the exact worst angle, making them duller more quickly. The only thing it might do (making it temporarily appear that your scissors are sharper) is reduce the burrs on the inside edges of the scissors. But, this technique ultimately changes the angle of the edge and will render the scissors duller over time.
 

silvercreek

Active Member
#7
You can sharpen fly tying scissors and it is easy to do. You will need 600 grit sandpaper, a smooth piece of glass, a black Sharpie marker and aluminum foil.

Open the scissors and color the outside beveled edges of the scissor blades with the Sharpie marker. Place the sandpaper grit side up on the piece of glass. Place the beveled edge of one side of the scissor blade on the sandpaper and stroke the beveled edge AWAY from the sharp edge of the scissor blade. This will form a metal burr on the INSIDE edge of the blade.

As you stroke, check the bevel to make sure that the black ink is being remove evenly along the entire bevel. This ensures you maintain the correct bevel angle. You will also be able to see any dings on the cutting edge. If there are dings, you will need to remove enough metal to remove the ding.

Then do the other blade. You will then have two blades with a metal burr metal on the inside of the scissor blade from tip to hinge.

The next step is to bend this metal burr to the outside of the blades. Use finger pressure to keep the blades from touching and close the scissors. Now open the blades and the burrs will hook each other and bend to the outside. Now you can slice the aluminum foil to remove the burr.

I use a different material for sharpening. I use a soft Arkansas whetstone (novaculite) that I lubricate with water. However, you need to reserve one only for scissors. If you use it to sharpen knives, it can get worn unevenly.
 

ScottP

Active Member
#8
from the interweb

Think about the angle at which you sharpen blades. Cutting foil would (if anything) work at the exact worst angle, making them duller more quickly. The only thing it might do (making it temporarily appear that your scissors are sharper) is reduce the burrs on the inside edges of the scissors. But, this technique ultimately changes the angle of the edge and will render the scissors duller over time.
Obviously I was sitting too close to an open bottle of head cement when I tried it.:)

Regards,
Scott