First Timer

#1
Gentlemen Hello,

New member and hopefully long time member.Been a flyfisher for many years and know very little.

Need opinions from the knowledgable and experienced:

Just starting to get into the SPEY-Fishing,

I have a 12.5 Ft. fast-action 10wt. that my father built back in the 80's...very stout rod--100 Ft of .41 running line and 3 sink-tips (type 8-10-14),,,I would like to know what grain? skagit head would be best suited for it?

I'll be doing short casts(30ft.) to hopefully long casts(100ft).

my trout fishing experience has given me the ability to put a 60 ft. cast w/ a 3wt. onto a dollar bill to a 7 wt. 15 ft. cast onto a dime.Learning to SPEY-cast will not be a problem.I am looking for all-around ideal set-up that a 20 yr. veteran would use.As my own knowledge and experience grows then I can get into more specified variations of line/head/cheaters and all that wonderful new terminology and gear you fellas have.

Please gentlemen any and all opinions will be greatly appreciated and used judiciously.

A.B. Langford

Thank-you Kindly
 
E

Evan Virnoche

Guest
#2
my trout fishing experience has given me the ability to put a 60 ft. cast w/ a 3wt. onto a dollar bill to a 7 wt. 15 ft. cast onto a dime.Learning to SPEY-cast will not be a problem.
Im sure it will not be a problem, but it will take practice lots of it because it is not the same. You wont pick up the spey and be able to bomb casts like one thinks.

According to rio's spey lines recs

the average 10 weight appears to use 620-700 grains. finding out which ones is the cats meeow is on you
http://www.rioproducts.com/skin/summit/pdf/2013_RIO_Spey_Line_Recs.pdf
 
#3
I should have also stated that I've checked out manufacturers websites as well as many other sites.

Real life experience feedback is what I'm looking for.

Thx "turds" for your input and I appreciate the effort ....please don't take this the wrong way----your post is really of no help at all (I say that as if one buddy talking to another buddy)
 
E

Evan Virnoche

Guest
#5
I should have also stated that I've checked out manufacturers websites as well as many other sites.

Real life experience feedback is what I'm looking for.

Thx "turds" for your input and I appreciate the effort ....please don't take this the wrong way----your post is really of no help at all (I say that as if one buddy talking to another buddy)
Well seeing how you have a custom rod that was built by your father. I assuming it is one of a kind at that no one other than yourself casting lines will know.

I would recommend a skagit head 23-26 feet ran with 8-15 feet of tips.

General rule is head length is not to.exceed 3 time rod lengths.
12Ft rod

Skagit compact 20-26 in length + 10-16 feet in tip lengths
 
#7
alrighty Turds that's what I'm looking for thankUUUUUUUUUU

yeah the custom rod is the tough one...so that's why I am looking for experience and not just some manufacturers guidelines.

help me wrap my head around what your saying there....so the Skagit head is the 700-720 grains?and the tips your talking about refers to sink-tips?

not sure what skagit compact means?is that just a shorter type....which would mean it loads the rod better and helps to pick up the sink-tip

and head length is everything starting from the running line up to the tippet?
 
#8
I like multi grain bread in the 7 and 10 grain category, here is a recipe I like to use. Hope it helps:

it could have if it was whole wheat but many of the grains in the multi don't float too well and break down quite quickly potentially resulting in a lost sink-tip as well as the fly.Since the flies I tie are modern works of art it would be very haphazard of me to put your suggestion to use.I'd like to thank-you for taking time out of your obvious busy schedule to share with me and others on this forum your opinions.Your willingness to give so much of yourself is very welcomed.I hope others are able to get the full use out of it as I have.
 
E

Evan Virnoche

Guest
#9
help me wrap my head around what your saying there....so the Skagit head is the 700-720 grains?and the tips your talking about refers to sink-tips?
and head length is everything starting from the running line up to the tippet?[/quote]

yes the head is what is going to load your rod. you can run mono, slick shooter, grip shooter, dental floss, shoe laces or whatever you want as running line

for the tips yes i am talking about type 8 type 10 and type 14 (RIO). This correlates with the amount of grains per foot. so in essence if you are using an additional 15 feet of t-14 it would be 210 grains additional.

so in essence the longer and heavier the tip the more rod length/power you will need.

example 12 feet of type 8 may swim at the same depth of say 8 feet type-14

This link explains much better
http://www.steelheadbum.com/store/pc/viewContent.asp?idpage=100

not sure what skagit compact means?is that just a shorter type....which would mean it loads the rod better and helps to pick up the sink-tip

yes the skagit maxis 700 grains with a 25 foot head head. according to rios sight they do not make a skagit max short in your desired grain window.

so in a nut shell say if i had an 11 foot rod 8wt that required 600 grains i could line it with skagit max (25 foot head) or a skagit max short (20 foot head)
i would normally opt to throw the short skagit and run longer tips, or run longer skagit with short tips
 
E

Evan Virnoche

Guest
#12
wow that was supposed to be a text messsage on my phone.

The general rule thumb is single hand line require 2 sizes bigger than 2 hander

8wt dh = 10 wt single line
9wt dh= 11 wt single line

1wt dh= 3wt single hander

And tips are unniversal for the most part

so t10-t-14 can be casted with 7-12 wt single handers fairly easy.


Spey rods require a grain window in which they load the rod, its no different than a single hander really. How you get to that grain window and what line u use is up to you.
 

FT

Active Member
#13
Although it is possible to spey cast with a "normal", i.e. single-hand, WF line and sink tip, it will likely be a study in frustration. You will need to upline at least 2 and most likely 3 line sizes if using a single-hand WF line from the line rating of the spey (2-hand) rod. Also, the standard single-hand WF line has a belly of only 30', spey lines, including Skagit lines when paired with a sink tip, are longer than that. This means, it will be difficult for you not to "pull the anchor" and blow the cast with a single-hand WF line on a spey rod.

Since you mentioned your rod is a 12.5' rod for a 10 wt, this means you'd have to use a 13 wt (and possibly a 14 wt) WF saltwater line to get the rod to load properly.

Therefore, do yourself a favor and buy a 10wt spey line for that rod.