How many do you have to your name?

#7
Pretty much the same as SF. I see a pattern I like then I tweak it to fit my needs. Usually it's a material change. For example I love Marabou but hate how it fouls, so I use Fox Tail instead and maybe a dubbed body vs Chenille and then wrap with wire. Definite changes but the same pattern overall.
I would say I have created one new pattern...but that may be debatable :)
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#9
You probably have a lot of Saltwater Flies I'm guessing. Tarpon,Bonefish, ect?
As has already been mentioned, the invention of a new pattern is difficult, but you wanted to know about new flies, not patterns, thus my answer. I play around with color variations and materials all the time and although it is likely that I'm the first person to have created a specific variation, I never honestly think about it as an invented fly. When I was younger though I used to engage in the same experimentation and each time I'd try something new, I'd need to name it; The Blood Thirsty Grizzly, Grizzly Snarl, Carey Fragrance, etc... I either ran out of name ideas or I made it to a point where it didn't matter. The last time I felt the need to name a fly was someone else's fly because the creator didn't have a name for it and it was unique enough that the pattern needed a name. That would be Kraniger's Barrel Bug, but he calls it a Bloody Mary (that just confused me though because it makes me think of the nymph of the same name). Well I guess I can't forget about the chironomid called the KTS (Those in the know know why!) I guess I do have two patterns now that are innovative enough that I could call my own invention, one is a blood worm pattern using super floss, and the other is a double eyed balance leech, but even those I would never tout as truly being my own because it is highly probable that I stole the idea somewhere along the way.

As for bonefish and tarpon patterns, same deal, I started with the basics and as a tier who tends to bore easily, I start experimenting.
 
#11
None of them worked worth spit.

I really doubt that someone could come up with a truly NEW pattern,
after all the variations that are out there, but not published.
 

Teenage Entomologist

Gotta love the pteronarcys.
#13
I meant a new pattern. I have 3 flies that I came up with out of my imagination. I think in order to have a fly that you invented yourself, you have to figure out the steps to tie it, and that can be a pain. The three that I came up with, 2 are October Caddis's, and the other is a roe pattern that dry fly purists would find insulting. Here they are

Swart's oKtober Kaddis Larvae
image.jpg

Swart's oKtober Kaddis Pupa
image.jpg

And finally Swart's Rejuvenating Roe( you might have seen it in my other thread)
image.jpg
 

GAT

Dumbfounded
#14
None of them worked worth spit.

I really doubt that someone could come up with a truly NEW pattern,
after all the variations that are out there, but not published.
You need to use materials and/or a hook that didn't exist before to come up with a truly new pattern. I tend not to claim that anything I think I came up with as original is really original. I may give it a name but that's just so I can communicate to my fishing buddies as to what I'm using.

Some of my popper patterns might be considered original because I use synthetic bodies and tying materials that were not available until recent times. However, simply using hard foam instead of cork and synthetic fibers instead of chicken feathers to accomplish the same appearance can't really be considered "new".

I've met Jim Teeny and have talked with him at length about East Lake and I like the guy. But I always thought it was humorous that he patented a fly pattern he tied. I hardly think the Teeny Nymph was never tied before by someone else before Jim put one together.
 
#15
I've met Jim Teeny and have talked with him at length about East Lake and I like the guy. But I always thought it was humorous that he patented a fly pattern he tied. I hardly think the Teeny Nymph was never tied before by someone else before Jim put one together.
Unless a person was going to tie and sell the flies commercially, I doubt that the patent is going to deter anyone that wanted to tie and fish it. IIRC it is a relative simple pattern to tie. But hey, it gets folks to talk about it and perhaps buy it. You can buy a bigger fish you know. Just a matter of the price of your fly rod, reel or line. Maybe hooks and flies also.