Lake Fishing book advice needed

Sinkline

Active Member
#31
And, if you know Denny Rickards, I suspect he's highly unlikely to regret anything he's ever said.
Krusty, don't get me wrong, Rickards is a fine Stillwater angler and has added much to the education of many would be Stillwater flyfishers. I agree with the majority of his teaching..., but he is wrong about large fish not eating small patterns, and yes I do believe he wishes he had never put that message in his Stillwater offerings (books vids).

I've spoken with Denny on the water a couple times, but I don't know him personally.


Randy
 

Krusty

Active Member
#32
Krusty, don't get me wrong, Rickards is a fine Stillwater angler and has added much to the education of many would be Stillwater flyfishers. I agree with the majority of his teaching..., but he is wrong about large fish not eating small patterns, and yes I do believe he wishes he had never put that message in his Stillwater offerings (books vids).

I've spoken with Denny on the water a couple times, but I don't know him personally.

I won't disagree that large trout will feed on very small aquatic prey when sufficient numbers exist, but most research indicates that there are transitions to larger aquatic prey as the survivors mature. Indeed, they often become piscivorous. I have caught some very large fish on streamers.

Large patterns still work quite well...in fact my experience indicates that they tend to be selective for larger fish....youngsters are either unable ingest such fare or it simply doesn't register as food.

Randy
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#33
I was watching the Tube late at night up while at my Dad's for T-day, and I viewed a show that was very interesting. "Megalodon Lives" was about the search for the large prehistoric ancestor to Great White sharks known as Megalodon, thought to be extinct. The search was initiated after a sport fishing boat was attacked and sunk by some large creature, with all four people aboard lost without a trace.

The researchers believed that the Humpback Whale was (is?) the preferred food of Megalodon, and is imprinted in its brain.

In trying to raise the big one, the researchers switched up from trolling a 5' long seal pattern (no follows, no strikes, no sonar image...nada!) to a 40' imitation of a Humpback Whale. After creating a chum slick about 5 miles long, they finally lured in a bunch of Great Whites, which swam around in the chum slick for some time. Then suddenly, the Great Whites all left the scene.
Something really big (on the sonar) swam into the chum slick, which their divers managed to tag with a radio transmitter, by shooting it into the huge unidentified creature with a speargun from the safety of a shark observation cage. (Other dramatic stuff happened at this point, and I won't spoil it for anyone who hasn't seen the show). Unfortunately, they were unable to get a photo. The big whatever then sounded to a depth greater than the transmitter could withstand (over 6,000'), and the signal was lost.
The lead researcher believes the creature was Megalodon.
This all took place near Cape Town, South AFrica.
 

Jim Wallace

Smells like low tide.
#34
I'm a believer of what I have read about juvenile anadromous fish getting imprinted with their food sources, and that being the reason why they will eat or strike at these same things when they return to their natal streams.
If this is true, then I can find no reason that large trout in a lake would not be similarly imprinted with food forms from their time spent as fry. Imprinting... wouldn't that result in unconscious behavior, later in life? Does not the imprint developed during the fry stage still scream food to the adult trout?
 
#35
I have found that big fish will pretty much take any size fly, they eat anything that they think might be food, big or small. That how they get to be big fish, that and avoid predators.
I must say though this thread is getting a bit off topic for the poor guy that just asked about a book. :D
 

Sinkline

Active Member
#37
I have found that big fish will pretty much take any size fly, they eat anything that they think might be food, big or small. That how they get to be big fish, that and avoid predators.
I must say though this thread is getting a bit off topic for the poor guy that just asked about a book. :D
Yes..., I apologize to the OP for 'jacking the thread. Seems conversation went toward supporting or challenging the teachings of various stillwater author's instead of talking about the overall value of any given literature itself.

All the books mentioned in this thread (I have them all, and more) bring a little something different, or at least approach similar concepts from a slightly different angle. If you are newer to Stillwater fly flingin', there is good and solid info. to be learned from all these publications.


Randy
 

Drifter

Active Member
#38
I was watching the Tube late at night up while at my Dad's for T-day, and I viewed a show that was very interesting. "Megalodon Lives" was about the search for the large prehistoric ancestor to Great White sharks known as Megalodon, thought to be extinct. The search was initiated after a sport fishing boat was attacked and sunk by some large creature, with all four people aboard lost without a trace.

The researchers believed that the Humpback Whale was (is?) the preferred food of Megalodon, and is imprinted in its brain.

In trying to raise the big one, the researchers switched up from trolling a 5' long seal pattern (no follows, no strikes, no sonar image...nada!) to a 40' imitation of a Humpback Whale. After creating a chum slick about 5 miles long, they finally lured in a bunch of Great Whites, which swam around in the chum slick for some time. Then suddenly, the Great Whites all left the scene.
Something really big (on the sonar) swam into the chum slick, which their divers managed to tag with a radio transmitter, by shooting it into the huge unidentified creature with a speargun from the safety of a shark observation cage. (Other dramatic stuff happened at this point, and I won't spoil it for anyone who hasn't seen the show). Unfortunately, they were unable to get a photo. The big whatever then sounded to a depth greater than the transmitter could withstand (over 6,000'), and the signal was lost.
The lead researcher believes the creature was Megalodon.
This all took place near Cape Town, South AFrica.



Yep I watched the same show!

And yes they had to "MATCH THE HATCH"------- HA--------
 
#41
I have found that big fish will pretty much take any size fly, they eat anything that they think might be food, big or small. That how they get to be big fish, that and avoid predators.
I must say though this thread is getting a bit off topic for the poor guy that just asked about a book. :D
Yes..., I apologize to the OP for 'jacking the thread. Seems conversation went toward supporting or challenging the teachings of various stillwater author's instead of talking about the overall value of any given literature itself.

All the books mentioned in this thread (I have them all, and more) bring a little something different, or at least approach similar concepts from a slightly different angle. If you are newer to Stillwater fly flingin', there is good and solid info. to be learned from all these publications.

Randy
Well, I'm the original poster, and I say "POST ON"! No need to apologize! I think every thread worth it's weight, gets "hi-jacked". Lots of good info here. :)

Just for the record, I catch most all of my big fish on bigger flies. However, I have caught some on size 14 or 16, but that's only because I was lucky.

I just don't spend that much time on lakes, but this year I'm going to try and dial them in - thus the thread post.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#42
Are you implying salmonids remember prey species by imprinting? It's been well demonstrated they are incapable of remembering much of anything at all. Anadromous fish 'remember' water chemistry of their native river, but the idea they remember particular prey species from their youthful days is preposterous. Most everything they do is programmed and instinctual, developed through eons of natural selection.
Well, I think I'll just disagree with you here. Yes I am implying that salmonoids have imprinted memories of prey species. Call me preposterous. Have you ever fished Rocky Ford? Your ability to watch fish absolutely refuse your offerings not because of pattern but because of "imprinting/aversion therapy" teaches you that fish do remember.
 

Drifter

Active Member
#43
After watching that show Mark is probably hard at work writing his new book on speed trolling techniques for megalodon ;)


Yeah I was thinking about it but got stuck right after thinking my nephew who works at a steel forge shop could forge me a 6 to 8 foot barbless hook, pound it, grind it, and shape it to what I would need. The problems came with dressing it to look like a whale. I had that figured out with my mothers red and black window drapes and big round mirrors for eyes, then thought, OH WAIT - HOW WOULD I RELEASE IT???

If you agree to reach in it's mouth to get the hook out I'm game!!! :eek: :D:p
 

Krusty

Active Member
#44
Well, I think I'll just disagree with you here. Yes I am implying that salmonoids have imprinted memories of prey species. Call me preposterous. Have you ever fished Rocky Ford? Your ability to watch fish absolutely refuse your offerings not because of pattern but because of "imprinting/aversion therapy" teaches you that fish do remember.
I guess I must be catching lunkhead trout, because on more than one occasion I've hooked and released fish that still had my previous fly they broke off my tippet.

Now, I'll grant you fish may get damn skittish in a place that's heavily fished like Rocky Ford...but I think it's highly unlikely that they're becoming averse to specific patterns. It's more likely they've become averse to crappy water-flogging presentations.

Nonetheless, I'm going to have to try this 'vertical flyfishing', but I'm just glad my old man never lived to see the day when his son started flyfishing with a bobber...he'd have found it every bit as disgusting as hunting with the aid of a quad.
 

bakerite

Active Member
#45
Lots to learn here on this forum! Here are a couple of other books that have a lot of good information:
1. Flyfishing the Mountain Lakes by Gary Lafontaine, a great book with some different techniques in it....has anyone here fished a floss line?
2. The Gilly (a flyfishers guide to BC) Alf Davy Lots of good information with chapters by a lot of bc's best on different topic and bugs.
3. Kamloops Steve Raymond BC specific, but lots of good information about stillwater fishing
4. How to Fish from Top to Bottom, Sid Gordon, An old book, not stillwater specific, but has lots of good information about water chemistry, clarity, weeds.

From what I hear, the best stillwater flyfishermen are from England. Does anyone here know of books form there?