Disturbing sea life news

#2
Sad thing is, this is old news.

I watched a documentary on this last year, and on PBS Newshour. It had the woman who was the first to "blow the whistle" on this issue, and how hard she had to get someones attention.

It's like most things, when they are practically gone, then folks take notice.
 

Porter

Active Member
#3
I had heard of it too, but thought it was some local thing, but wow, the scope of it now is alarming. Thanks for the heads-up on the documentary. Going to try to find it and watch it...... and yeah Im guilty of being one of those to take late notice :{
 
#4
I think we all are Porter. Problem is, we just don't know about it in time. The people who can do something, should look into it sooner, rather than "kick the can down the road", and make it someone else's problem. But hey, that's the "American way" right? :-(
 

Clarki

I'd rather be reading water
#5
My source at DFW has fortunately figured this one out. They will begin farming juvenile sea stars and dumping them into our local bays to ensure populations remain strong. Of course they will remove one of the legs prior to release. What a relief.
 

Bob Triggs

Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!
#6
Over the last year, and especially the last six months, our east-end Olympic Peninsula starfish have been melting away with this at an astonishing rate. When I go out rowing at low tide I am used to seeing many hundreds of them in a day, all over the rocks and walls and pilings etc. Now they are almost completely gone. They still do not know the exact cause or causes, which may be linked to warmer waters, weakened immunity, microbes etc. One of the good resources for information on this is the Sea Doc Society www.seadocsociety.org
(They are also doing some interesting population research studies on sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in the San Juan Islands region.)
http://olympicpeninsulaflyfishing.blogspot.com
 

freestoneangler

Not to be confused with Freestone
#9
Now that you mentioned it, I've noticed fewer and fewer at the beaches. I thought perhaps it might be a seasonal thing as I tend to beach patrol only in Mar-Jun.
 

Alosa

Active Member
#11
Think about the long-term implications for the marine ecosystem and for us. Starfish eat urchins and keep their numbers in check. When urchin abundances go unchecked they eat the kelp 'holdfasts' (the 'anchors' that keep kelp attached to the bottom) and generate 'urchin barrens'. The kelp are important for production of oxygen in the water and primary production in the oceans. Start connecting the dots...the ripple effects of this could be catastrophic along our coast.
 

plaegreid

Saved by the buoyancy of citrus
#12
Think about the long-term implications for the marine ecosystem and for us. Starfish eat urchins and keep their numbers in check. When urchin abundances go unchecked they eat the kelp 'holdfasts' (the 'anchors' that keep kelp attached to the bottom) and generate 'urchin barrens'. The kelp are important for production of oxygen in the water and primary production in the oceans. Start connecting the dots...the ripple effects of this could be catastrophic along our coast.

Are sea urchin tasty? Could we start a fashion trend where young women wear the spines in their hair? I sense a money-making/sea-saving opportunity here.
 

rustybee

Active Member
#15
Mmmm.... Urchin is often served in the form of sushi and commonly known as Uni. One of the tastiest way I've been served uni is as a butter sauce in pasta (a well known NYC restaurant's specialty).