A lesson learned

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by SpokaneFisherman, Sep 12, 2002.

  1. hikepat

    hikepat Patrick

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    A correct catch and release method

    Funny I was taught to not ever touch the gills. Removel of the slim in that area or around the eyes will cause the fish to have a high degree of getting an infection. Which could kill the fish slowly or blind it. I agree that after any long battle to keep the fish in the water for a minute or two before removing to take photo. If you are not taking a photo to keep the fish in the water and remove the hook and release if you are in slow water or a lake. Take it over to slow water if you are in fast water. Funny how we all seem have diffrent thoughts on this subject.
     
  2. Jim Jenkins

    Jim Jenkins New Member

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    Something I learned from the guide we had back in June on the Colorado R. at Lee's Ferry.
    As someone above said make sure your hands are wet and that he holds them in the net upside down. What also works if you bring them to hand is to hold them upside down, this does something to their equilibrium and they don't squirm around any more. This makes it a lot easier to remove the hook. Our guide also never uses a net, not even one on the boat. He told us it was better for the fish, a net of any kind does some damage, just look at the slime on it after releasing a fish. This same guide and all the guides with the shop we chartered through are C&R only! They are taking care of this fishery and practice what they preach. We also used very light tippets, 5X/6X and if they broke off, no big deal. We went through 2 dozen flies that day, which were all supplied and tied by the guide. In all we caught about 40 fish that day and I don't think we harmed any of them! The water temperature was also 48 degrees which helps too. These guys are on the river over 200 days a year and what they do makes sense.
    Jim J.
     

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