Advice on first Spey Rod

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by MikeP, Dec 9, 2011.

  1. MikeP

    MikeP New Member

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    I have researched the forum and the internet and visited local shops to gather information on what would be a good first spey rod. It sounds like the optimal rod for summer and winter steelhead is something from 12' 6" to 13' 6". I plan on fishing the Skagit, Sauk, Sky, and Stilly. Hopefully venturing to the OP and Oregon.

    My main question is what weight rod to get. It seems like a 7 wt would be a good all around rod, but I have been advised to get a 6 wt. The advice is that it will be easier to fish all day, and still have the distance for the Skagit. Some people are saying an 8 wt is the best all around rod, so I'm getting confused.

    I will be fishing from a Scadden Assult XX, stopping to cast from near shore, so some of the more powerful rods in a shorter length seem like they might be a good idea if I'm up against the brush.

    I don't have an unlimited budget, and might get a blank and build one. Does anyone know anything about the CND rods or blanks? How do they compare to the Echo or TFO rods?

    I do have a Sage 890 single handed rod for steelhead and salmon.

    Thanks in advance for your advice. Once this decision is made then the whole line quest will begin.

    Mike
     
  2. Nooksack Mac

    Nooksack Mac Active Member

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    You're right about the length; that's the most popular range. One compromise rod can't be perfect for all seasons, but a 7 or 8 covers a lot of the territory. The CND rods are top-notch, although they're disappearing from the U.S. market due to a lack of a successful American distributor. Some rods and blanks are still available; but good luck with warranty service from Japan. The CND Solstice 13' 3" 7/8 is one of my favorites, and would fit your pistol just fine. In time, you'll want other rods, from a light switch to a long heavyweight.
     
  3. Derek Day

    Derek Day Rockyday

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    If you actually tie into a fish on a river like the skagit, I feel, that using a 6wt is just asking to get your ass handed to you. Others might disagree, but that's my opinion. I'd go with something at least 7/8 wt. I think that the best option would be to get two rods, one for summers, one for winters. Buy yourself an 8wt spey rod, then build yourself a 6/7 forecast or a 6wt batson switch. If you get one rod that does both, it will do neither job well.
     
  4. Wadecalvin

    Wadecalvin Member

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    Consider the Beulah Classic 12'7" 7/8 -its lightweight- powerful, easy to cast, you can get a blank for not too much over 200$
     
  5. Rick Sharp

    Rick Sharp Member

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    Pick up a Meiser Highander Classic 12'6" 6/7/8 blank for 225 and have Steve build you a 475gr Skandit for it and that will cover about everything you will encounter and an absolute joy to cast all day as well, my personal opinion anyway, I just love mine.
     
  6. Wadecalvin

    Wadecalvin Member

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    I thought I had made an excellent suggestion but I'm afraid a Mieser might trump a Beulah, so I would have to say that this may be an even better way to go. Good call Rick.
     
  7. Jim Darden

    Jim Darden Active Member

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    my advice would be to cast a bunch of your buddies rods and pick one out that you like. They have already spent the cash to find the line that matches the rod and that can save you a lot of cash. I have cast rods that I thought were absolute dogs and then found a line that made them absolutely "magic". There are just some combinations that seem to be able to cast by themselves as if they were battery powered. Amy at DesChutes River Anglers has steered me right in the past and I think if I were to buy a rod without casting it, I would go to her, an added benefit is no sales tax. IMHO the secret to saving money is buying the right combination of line and rod for your application. The first rod I bought was a Sage but I spent more than the price of the rod finding the right line. Lessons can be expensive!
     
  8. SPEYBUM

    SPEYBUM Member

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    If you want to try a few rods before you jump into the Water Come join me at Fall City for the Day On The River each Saturday from 9 to 12 and it's free.
     
  9. MikeP

    MikeP New Member

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    Thanks everyone for the great advice. I think I am leaning towards at least a 7 wt now. I keep thinking I dont' want a quiver or rods, but I know I don't like to compromise with my equipment. It's hard to try out rods since I don't know how to cast a spey rod yet, but I may take Speybum up on his offer to join him on the river.
     
  10. Klickrolf

    Klickrolf Active Member

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    Take Speybum up on his offer, speycasting comes slowly for alot of people.
     

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