Anini Beach Kauai Info Needed

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Tom Arroll, Apr 15, 2012.

  1. Tom Arroll Member

    Posts: 285
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +9 / 0
    Hi,

    Just arrived at our rental at Anini Beach On Kauai. We are staying across street from beach very near the end of the road where the river/creek comes out. I am interested in trying for bonefish but can't figure out the right places as it is not typical flats. Last time I came here I tried this area but found most of the water too deep. Anyone have some details about areas to focus on? May try to hire Rob Arita but have not decided yet as the $$ has been hemmorhaging from my wallet so far this trip. Kauai seems more $$ since I last came 3 yr ago.
    Mahalo Thomas
  2. David Loy Senior Moment

    Posts: 2,435
    Wolf Bay
    Ratings: +331 / 2
    Watch your valuables was advice I was given. Lot of indegents living in tents picking shells for a living there.
    No current fishing advice to offer. I know its tough casting into a steady 40 + knot North wind. There may be a young guide named Nigel working. He is tall, walks through the water like its not there and has great eyes.

    IF you happen to be a retired Vet with Base privileges you could look into flats access on the Barking Sands Missle Range on the South tip of the island. In the late 50s a Bone was caught there that held the world record for awhile. It's a long drive from where you are staying but you could also take in the Grand Canyon of the Pacific the same day.
  3. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    I'd possibly give Nervous Waters and/or Coach Duff a call to see if they can direct you to some more local knowledge.
  4. Kim Hampton Not Politically Correct

    Posts: 276
    Tacoma, Wa
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I fished with Arita 4 or 5 years ago. He took me to the area very close to where you are staying by the creek...not on the far side, I guess it would be East of the stream if I remember correctly how the beach lays. We also went along the beach at the other end. I was hoping he was better at spotting them than I but the conditions that morning were almost impossible to see into the water. No success. I tried it the next day on my own. I did learn a valuable lesson that day. It's not good to step in a deep hole with your unprotected key fob to the rental car in your shirt pocket. The car will not start when the fob is toast. It's a long wait for the tow truck. Lucky the cell phone worked at that beach.
  5. Tom Arroll Member

    Posts: 285
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +9 / 0
    Kim, David and Jordan,

    Thank you for the info. Saw someone getting guided and they were fishing the near side of the channel off the creek as Kim said. This seems to be one of the fishier spots as it is one of the biggest channel the whole area drains through (prevailing winds push water here). Fished a bit last time I was here but lots o snorklers and kids thowing rocks at the time. I am staying 200 yards from the channel so there is a good stretch of water I can hit when the conditions are right. Saw some papio and needle fish but no bones sighted so far. Trades are up and the clouds are on an off so tough conditionts but is sure beats work:) .

    Cheers,

    Thomas
  6. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    When the trades are up and heading inland, those are sometimes the days you want to go out. A lot of fly fishers will say "It's too windy" but honestly, those windy days can sometimes push big bones up onto the flat with the right tide. Take a bigger stick (we used 9 and 10wts when it's windy) that can punch the wind and have at it. I know that sight-fishing is the "way to bonefish" but honestly, if you want to up your chances at hooking up with one, blind casting is a successful method that does work: I've done it myself in Hawai'i and I've seen the fruits it can produce first hand.
    If you get shots at Papio I highly suggest taking them- they are a total blast that pound for pound put up one of the best fights I've ever had based on their size and strength.
    I would still suggest giving Sean and Clay a call at Nervous Waters to see if they can direct you to some people over on Kauai or the Coach at 808-292-9680.
  7. Tom Arroll Member

    Posts: 285
    Seattle, WA
    Ratings: +9 / 0
    Jordan,

    Thanks for the info. I brough my 10 wt as I figured the wind would be up. As you suggest I have been setting up in some channels on the in tide and blind casting. I did communicate with Coach last trip and he gave me the name of Rob Arita who seems to be the go to person here. There was someone name Nigel who guided here inthe past but not sure if he still is guiding here. I am just a bit reluctant to lay out significant cash for a guide when the conditions are less than ideal. I have hired a guide on Oahu and the Cook Islands and learned quite a bit about Pacific Bone fish and Trevale from them. Going out right now to give it a try as the sun is up and the winds not too bad. If I get frustrated I will try to hook up with guide Rob.

    Cheers,

    Thomas
  8. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    Every time that I have hooked up blind-casting in Hawai'i I was using a size 2 orange Gotcha or similar with heavy eyes. You want that fly down on/near the bottom and with the winds moving water on the surface your fly line can get a bow in it that lifts the fly up. Stay down. Long casts and just do the good old hand twist retrieve with a few jerks now and again.

    And remember, those Hawaiian bones can get big so hold on!
  9. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    Setting up blind casting on the incoming tide can work, but try fishing the outgoing. Wade as far out as you can that you are still safe (don't be a hero) and fan your casts into the channel. When the tide is high the bones are usually up on the flat already and you are wanting to intercept them as they eat and cruise on their way out.
  10. 2kayaker New Member

    Posts: 23
    Sedro Wooley, Wa
    Ratings: +8 / 0
    Try sending an email to Jeffry Delia in Quilcene--he used to guide for bones at Anini-deliajeffrey@yahoo.com. I used to windsurf there when I lived there in the 80's. Ditto on the chum fry!- Michael
  11. Jason Decker Active Member

    Posts: 2,626
    Issaquah, WA
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    im heading to kauai for almost 4 weeks, looking for good intel, any kauai locals on this board?
  12. flyfisherwoman New Member

    Posts: 1
    bellingham, WA
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    I went out with Rob. He is a great guide. It is expensive tho. I think the hardest part is seeing the fish. The bones will come right up to the shore. Plus they are easier to see there.
  13. Tacoma Red Active Member

    Posts: 658
    Kitsap
    Ratings: +328 / 0
    Tom,
    Yes Jeff Delia is an excellent resource as he had a guide business there a long time ago. I've had success just west of Tunnels, also Hanalei Beach park and Kapa'a beach park. Sharer has a beach house at Tunnels...
    TR
  14. plugboots Member

    Posts: 67
    Winthrop, WA
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    You could do this too, (from Dan Blanton's board):
    Posted by Louie the Fish! on 2012-06-21 14:57:32
    Yes it can be done , and we did it! Four of us fished the stocked Puuloa reservoir up at Kokee State Park on Kauai on June 16, opening day, and it was great fun! Most locals were using spin gear, lures bait, etc, and catching pretty good, but with flies we slaughtered them. We even used dry flys most of the time.
    I caught one and lost one in a Kokee Stream earlier, in the photo, but the rest of the day was wading around in the reservoir catching a trout on every cast!
    The season stays open til end of September, in case you visit Kauai. We fished with young local guide Nigel Warrack,
    (808 652 9038)(nigeljeep1988@hotmail.com), who is an excellant Kauai guide. He took me to a remote bonefish spot next day, where he has seen bones close to 20 pounds. He hooked and lost one in the 2 hours we fished. I never got into any but saw some. All in all it was a great fishing holiday close to home!
    Tightlines,
    Louie the Fish!
  15. Jason Decker Active Member

    Posts: 2,626
    Issaquah, WA
    Ratings: +1 / 0
    jordan, what kind of set up do you use? flies?thanks for the intel

  16. Jordan Simpson Active Member

    Posts: 788
    Tsawwassen, BC
    Ratings: +54 / 1
    Hey, sorry for such a late reply- I've been living in the Haida Gwaii working at a lodge and our internet is super spotty.

    For the calmer days, a medium to fast action 8wt with a reel that can hold a good capacity of gel-spun backing is what I usually use with a clear floating line. You don't need a tropical line for Hawaii.
    On the windier days, or when I know I'll be needing some back bone in the case I am going after big fish or am in an area where a fish could easily make it's way over the reef edge a 10wt set up is ideal. Yes, that's right- a 10wt.

    When blind casting you are also usually covering and fishing deeper water and therefor you'll want your flies to get down quick and for them to stay down. That in mind, CUSTOM tied flies (i.e, tied yourself) help wonders as they can be tied with heavier eyes on heavy wire hooks. Most readily available bonefish flies are tied for the Seychelles, Cuba, the Bahamas, Mexico, and so forth- and are tied a little smaller and a little lighter all round. Some of the bigger Hawaiian bonefish can straighten out hooks.The smaller bones, obviously not, but you never know what you're going to hook up to right? You'll want your flies tied on heavier gauge hooks and with heavy eyes to get out and to get down. When the winds are up, the surface movement of the water can cause your line to bow, and that in turn can cause your fly to be lifted up off the bottom. Tied weedless and heavy, you'll help counter that.

    As for leaders, I generally tie my own but have since been really impressed with Seagaur's 20lb tapered flouro leaders- but to each their own, right?
  17. Denny Active Member

    Posts: 4,049
    Seattle, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +46 / 0
    Word. I totally agree with this.

    You want your fly to stay 'down', and when fishing deeper (relatively) water, you need to get down. The heavier dumbbell eyes will get you there, and reduce the wind lift. Bones will chase the fly up from the bottom at times, but the bulk of the time the fly on the bottom will be the one they want.

    When blind casting, I like to use very heavy leaders/tippet, too, relative to typical bonefish leaders, primarily because one so the leader will turn over when casting the heavy(ier) weighted fly, and two because (my opinion) the fish aren't as skittish (aka leader shy) when they are in deeper water. Also, strong hooks are important.