any reports?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by D3Smartie, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

    anyone been out on the salt lately? I am fishing hood canal tomorrow. Hopefully i will find a few.
     
  2. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

    Last weekend stunk up in Sno Co; I blame the nearly full moon, excessive tides, lack of wind, to much wind, to much work, and stable weather. Oh yea, big fish got the pre-solstice blues. Only a few 10” cutts and lots of 5" smolt committing suicide on my streamer.
     
  3. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

    a few fish this morning on the canal... bait seems very scattered in small balls. the bait also seems to be bigger this year, or the little stuff just hasnt shown up yet. maybe 3 inches... long and skinny
     
  4. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

    D3S, hope the fishing was better than the catching, or so the saying goes. It's always nice to get out mid-week, and I imagine you had the beach to yourself. Any size on the 'few' that you caught?

    Good observation on the bait balls; I noticed that too and but didn't think to mention it earlier, but the same thing appears off several beaches in Sno County. Sand lance in relatively small groupings, but to my recall individuals seemed significantly larger than usual for June compared with last year. I was using sparse 1.5 to 2" imitations, and later switched up as the size appeared to be just under 3.75". Didn't help though, and over a 6 hour morning only saw a few larger fish jump offshore in a rip about 300+ ft out.

    Well, new weather patterns moving in yesterday afternoon, might change that up, but I'm headed over the hump this weekend and will no doubt hit the beach after I get back and caught up with the honey-do list.
    Good fishing,
    Jim
     
  5. D3S, were you hooking up with cutts and looking for coho or ? It was a huge tide today, I would think that could influence the location of some fish as well.

    Sterling
     
  6. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

    i was just out doing a little recon.... the cuts were big but not many of them... then in one area there were lots but smaller.... i think i may have caught my smallest SRC ever today...
    Didnt see any that i could be positive were salmon.
     
  7. Jim Kerr

    Jim Kerr Active Member

    D3
    I imagine I may have hit some of the same spots on Tues.
    Yep cutts were big, not great numbers but good. I did find the little bait, but even so no real concentration of foot long fish. As you say, either alot bigger or a lot smaller.
    I will have two boats out there on Fri.
    Jim
     
  8. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

    the farther north i went in the canal the more bait i saw... Maybe it just has to take a little time to move on down south... :confused:
     
  9. ibn

    ibn Moderator Staff Member

    I launched at salsbury (hood canal bridge) last sunday and fished around foulweather bluff and "the sea monster", we hooked 3 fish landed 2 searuns, one was very plump around 18". Saw a lot of bait being chased mostly by birds though. Didn't see any salmon yet.
     
  10. Les Johnson

    Les Johnson Les Johnson

    When fishing our Washington salt it is important to simply gather one's gear and go fishing. Salmon and cutthroat are almost always around in the better known spots but not always since they move quickly when following bait that is being swept along by tidal movement. Fly fishing in saltwater is primarily a hunting pursuit as much as casting and stripping back flies. Remember that today's barren water may be tomorrow's hotspot. So, while it never hurts to ask for reports and most folks on this board are very generous with their information, it is equally important to simply grab the gear and lunch and hit the beaches regularly -- particularly places you haven't fished before. Building one's own salt water fly fishing data base is a great addition to receiving the valuable information posted here..
    Good Fishing,
    Les Johnson
     
  11. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

    I Saw Finning Coho This Morning>>>>> Wooohooo
     
  12. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

    les... have you explored the movements of cuts in the salt? they dont seem to move very far, and i think i was told they rarely travel more than 5 or 10 miles from their home stream... dont know if there is any truth to that but you might.
     
  13. tyeechuck

    tyeechuck Member

    I fished the extreme low tide on Thursday. went out in the middle of the day mostly to explore the changes in the bottom on my favorite local beach. Nothing but a few hits on a krill by some herring which showed in good number on the outgoing. Usually this is best on this beach. When the tide changed the strikes increased but only one small cut hooked. The wind out of the north caused my fly to be brought up too high while using a floating line. I switched to a heavier bait fish pattern. While tying on I had a harbor seal surface only 5 feet away. This freaked me a little but I told it to go away. The seal did leave went out about 30 feet then turned and raced straight at me under water turning at the last second less than a foot from me. I gave up that area, I was spooked enough. Back in '99 I was hit by a seal down at Lincoln Park it nearly knocked me down and scared the crap out of both of us The rest of my time out I fished the lesser water leaving the prime spot to my my cousin the seal. (see the Secret of Roan Inish) {My mothers family is from the wild west of Ireland} I did get one more hard hit in a tidal mix master of extreme tides turning but I lost it.

    Jim
     
  14. Les Johnson

    Les Johnson Les Johnson

    Cutts do travel

    If you've perused my new book you will find that there are verified reports that coastal cutthroat have been found by the the Oregon State University College of Fisheries research vessel 40 miles off of the Siusilaw and Columbia river plumes and 100 feet deep, swimming around just happy as all getout. Generally cutthroat don't move in the salt more than a few miles from their home rivers, particularly in the protected environment of Puget Sound and Hood Canal where food is readily available. However we must remember that coastal cutthroat are as Darwin Jones, an Alaska biologist said, "they are the true noncomformists of the trout family". Washington biologist Curt Kraemer said, "Just when you think you have them in a box, they get out". So, they may stay close to natal estuaries, or not.
    Much of this was touched on in my first book in 1971 and expanded upon in the second edition in 1978. What it is important to remember is that the anadromous coastal cutthroat of the Pacific Coast is probably the largest population of wild sea-run trout in the world. We should be treating them as a bonifde treasure. A whole lot of people who understand the value of such a magnificent trout were involved in saving the coastal cutthroat when Washington populations went into severe decline; a battle that began in 1974 and continues today. The coastal cutthroat is not out of the woods yet.
    Good Fishing,
    Les Johnson
     

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