Anyone baking their own bread?

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by IveofIone, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. Stew McLeod

    Stew McLeod aka BigMac

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,202
    Media:
    37
    Likes Received:
    103
    Location:
    Renton, WA
    Well took me awhile, but this thread spurred me on to make my own bread.

    Before the Huskies game I made two loafs of Honey Whole Wheat. Turned out okay and taste great.

    I tried two different pans - one glass and one aluminum. I found the glass pan worked better. Anybody else use glass pans?

    Stew

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4
     
  2. Trapper Badovinac

    Trapper Badovinac Author, Writer, Photographer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2013
    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    676
    Location:
    Helena, Montana
    Home Page:
    For reasons unknown to me (I'm not a chemist or metallurgist) raw aluminum and yeast are not a happy couple. If you store your sour dough starter in aluminum it doesn't seem to grow very well. Glass or plastic works much better. It won't kill the yeast, but it seems to retard it. Consequently, I do my best to keep my dough away from aluminum. I have found that if the aluminum pan is coated, it's ok.

    If you're making any whole wheat bread and you don't put any high gluten flour in with it, it's likely to be pretty dense. If you're happy with the taste but want it less dense, add some "made for bread" flour.

    Trapper
     
    Jerry Daschofsky likes this.
  3. IveofIone

    IveofIone Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Messages:
    3,246
    Likes Received:
    1,337
    Location:
    .
    Aluminum pans are great. For storing screws. They are rectangular and reasonably deep and offer enough surface area so you can easily paw through them looking for just the right screw plus their shape lends itself well to storing on a shelf or in a cabinet. They have no place in our kitchen.

    We bake bread at least twice a week and have for many years. Norpro pans are the gold standard as far as I can tell. They are dimpled steel and non stick. Bread bakes evenly all around instead of blond on the bottom and brown on top.

    No-knead sourdough is baked in a cast iron dutch oven and french bread is baked in the perforated double cradle that I believe Trapper turned me onto. Glass is certainly the lesser of two evils compared to aluminum but it is a dish rather than a pan and as such it takes longer to heat when first presented to the oven. Steel transfers heat much faster and contributes to the oven spring the bread needs to reach it's full shape quickly and helps the bread to brown more evenly.

    Ive

    Incidentally, probably the best bread of all is baked with no pan but on a pizza stone or hearth. Just be sure the stone is at maximum temp before the bread goes on. I usually preheat for about an hour before baking.
     
  4. Trapper Badovinac

    Trapper Badovinac Author, Writer, Photographer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2013
    Messages:
    501
    Likes Received:
    676
    Location:
    Helena, Montana
    Home Page:
    Ive - I have no aluminum pans either. They are cheaper and lighter, but leave anything tomato based in them overnight and it will eat pinholes in it. I tried cooking with an aluminum Dutch Oven once. (The outfitter thought they weighed less for packing) It was awful. The bread was near burnt on one side and near goo on the other side. To be fair it was in a fairly stiff cool breeze but my cast DOs never did that.

    I'm glad you like the perforated baking pans. Toss some semolina on them before putting the dough in them for a crunchier crust. I do that with my Ciabbata bread.

    Do you know why aluminum retards yeast?

    Trapper
     
  5. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    8,043
    Media:
    453
    Likes Received:
    796
    Location:
    Graham, WA, USA.
    Home Page:
    I bet it's a chemical reaction. Most aluminum really don't have a patina. So bet there's something in the aluminum that hinders it's process. No idea, but I know growing up my grandparents never used metal to make dough or starters. Always was glass or clay. My one Grandma used to make her own hard clay pots to store the sourdough starter in. But don't recall them using any metal for their bread products, except their baking pans. And if memory serves me, my one Grandma always had cast iron baking pans. Her bundt pan weighed a TON.

    Oh, I'm all with you on the aluminum DO. I will say, they are SUPER light. My 12" hard anodized DO weighs just under 5#, where my 12" CI DO weighs just over 20#. Nice on float trips. Usually toss two in the box and use as a multi use pan. But, you're right, sucks for heat retention. Heats up fast, cools off faster. Get a good wind and you better have a damned good wind block.
     
  6. freestoneangler

    freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2006
    Messages:
    4,608
    Media:
    24
    Likes Received:
    917
    Location:
    Edgewood, WA
    We did the bread maker thing back when those were the rage. Use to buy quality component in Puyallup...Dottie's I think? Experimented with various recipe's and found a few we like. Over time, my wife just didn't like the fuss and muss of making and cleaning. Also, it seemed we could never make some of the types we liked most well in the bread maker. These days, the only breads my wife makes are rolls and a really great pizza dough....we love making homemade pizza's...usually don't in the warmer months...time to start again :cool:.
     
  7. Stew McLeod

    Stew McLeod aka BigMac

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    1,202
    Media:
    37
    Likes Received:
    103
    Location:
    Renton, WA
    Well second batch of bread complete. This batch is an 80 / 20 mix of whole wheat and white.

    I found the 100 percent whole wheat was a bit heavy.

    Once again, thanks for the inspiration folks.

    uploadfromtaptalk1379397078138.jpg

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk 2
     
  8. vonjefe

    vonjefe Von Jefe

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2013
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Seattle
    I bake my own bread in a dutch oven. Good ingredients make all the difference - can't beat King Arthur flour.
     
    Bradley Miller likes this.

Share This Page