Aquatic Insect #5 ID?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Entomology' started by Taxon, May 22, 2012.

  1. [​IMG]
    This aquatic insect was collected in a kicknet sample from the South Fork Snoqualmie River. Can you identify it by any of the following?

    Order common name:
    Order taxonomic name:
    Family common name:
    Family taxonomic name:
    Genus taxonomic name:
    Lifestage:
     
  2. Good start, Travis.

    IDENTIFICATIONS

    Order common name:
    Order taxonomic name:
    Family common name:
    Family taxonomic name:
    Genus taxonomic name:
    Lifestage: larva (Travis Bille)
     
  3. Cranefly larva

    Order: Diptera
    Family: Tipulidae



    Jay
     
  4. P.S. the order diptera is "flies"

    jay
     
  5. I see someone was faster and said cranefly. The aquatic cranefly larva are real big and like chronies on steroids. I've seen them in lakes up in BC.
     
  6. Good work with Diptera and Tipulidae, Jay. However, even though Cranefly and flies are close enough for partial credit, it's actually
    Crane Fly (with a space between Crane and Fly) and True Fly.

    IDENTIFICATIONS

    Order common name: True Fly (jwg/Taxon)
    Order taxonomic name: Diptera (jwg)
    Family common name: Crane Fly (jwg/Taxon)
    Family taxonomic name: Tipulidae (jwg)
    Genus taxonomic name:
    Lifestage: larva (Travis Bille)
     
  7. Could well be, zen leecher, as the larvae of several aquatic genera of crane flies are known to inhabit stillwaters. Of course, the vast majority of crane fly larvae are strictly terrestrial, while some are semi-aquatic, preferring marginal moist areas.
     
  8. Genus: Dicranota

    I indulged in severe cheating to get that.
     
  9. Hi Chad,

    Next time, try consulting the Pacific NW Aquatic Insect Genera larval descriptions [​IMG] on my website. That way, you can arrive at the same answer without feeling that you've cheated, and derive much more satisfaction by figuring out the answer yourself.

    IDENTIFICATIONS

    Order common name: True Fly (jwg/Taxon)
    Order taxonomic name: Diptera (jwg)
    Family common name: Crane Fly (jwg/Taxon)
    Family taxonomic name: Tipulidae (jwg)
    Genus taxonomic name: Dicranota (Chad Lewis)
    Lifestage: larva (Travis Bille)
     
  10. Bugguide lists Dicranota in a different family


    Order Diptera - Flies
    No Taxon "Nematocera" (Non-Brachycera)
    Infraorder Tipulomorpha - Crane Flies
    Family Pediciidae - Pediciid Crane Flies
    Genus Dicranota
     
  11. Good catch, Jay. Apparently, Integrated Taxonomic Information System, which I have relied on for everything other than mayflies, caddisflies, and stoneflies, doesn't yet reflect more recent crane fly taxonomy. I will need to update my website.

    IDENTIFICATIONS

    Order common name: True Fly (jwg/Taxon)
    Order taxonomic name: Diptera (jwg)
    Family common name: Crane Fly (jwg/Taxon) Hairy-eyed Crane Fly (Taxon)
    Family taxonomic name: Tipulidae (jwg) Pediciidae (jwg)
    Genus taxonomic name: Dicranota (Chad Lewis)
    Lifestage: larva (Travis Bille)
     

  12. Roger, I was making an assumption that aquatic cranefly and tipulidae were the same bug. I've also seen these "bugs" under leaves in the Yakima. The BC lake was Sapeye up out on highway 20.
     
  13. Yes Bill, as had I, at least until Jay pointed out that genus Dicranota was listed under family Pediciidae on BugGuide. However, have now updated my website's Aquatic/Semiaquatic True Fly Taxonomic Structure to reflect the breaking up of Tipulidae into (5) Crane Fly families, three of which are represented in the Pacific NW. Thanks for sharing the name of the lake where you observed crane fly larvae. Have heard of Sapeye Lake, but have never been up that way.
     

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