Aquatic Insect #7 ID?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Entomology' started by Taxon, Jun 3, 2012.

  1. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

    [​IMG]

    This aquatic insect is mostly found in WA lakes. Can you identify it by any of the following?

    Lifestage:
    Order common name:
    Order taxonomic name:
    Family common name:
    Family taxonomic name:
    Genus taxonomic name:
     
  2. Travis Bille

    Travis Bille Active Member

    Lifestage: Spinner
    Order: Ephemoroptera
    Family: Leptohyphidae
    Genus: Tricorythodes
     
  3. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

    Hi Travis,

    Not a spinner; notice the non-wettable hairs (barely) visible on the trailing edge of its forewing. Neither family Leptohyphidae, nor genus Tricorythodes; close, but no cigar. ;)

    IDENTIFICATIONS

    Lifestage:
    Order common name:
    Order taxonomic name: Ephemeroptera (Travis Bille)
    Family common name:
    Family taxonomic name:
    Genus taxonomic name:
     
  4. jwg

    jwg Active Member

    Lifestage: Dun
    Gender: female

    jay
     
  5. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

    Hi Jay,

    Yes, I "believe" it to be a female dun.

    IDENTIFICATIONS

    Lifestage: subimago/dun (jwg)
    Order common name:
    Order taxonomic name: Ephemeroptera (Travis Bille)
    Family common name:
    Family taxonomic name:
    Genus taxonomic name:
    Gender: female (jwg)
     
  6. jwg

    jwg Active Member

    I was thinking the small eyes might mean it was female, thinking that males often have much larger eyes than females. Is that sometimes the case?

    Jay
     
  7. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

    Yes Jay, the female mayfly subimago and imago generally has smaller eyes than their male counterparts, and can be differentiated from them on that basis, particularly from a lateral view photo.
     
  8. Bob Newman

    Bob Newman Member

    Genus Caenidae
     
  9. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

    Hi Bob,

    Welcome aboard, and well done. However, Caenidae is actually the taxonomic name of the family, not the genus.;)

    IDENTIFICATIONS

    Lifestage: subimago/dun (jwg)
    Order common name: ???
    Order taxonomic name: Ephemeroptera (Travis Bille)
    Family common name: ???
    Family taxonomic name: Caenidae (Bob Newman)
    Genus taxonomic name: ???
    Gender: female (jwg)
     
  10. jwg

    jwg Active Member

    Order common name - Mayflies
    Family common name - Small Squaregilled Mayflies
     
  11. Etamaman

    Etamaman Member

    Genus taxonomic name: ???

    Ephemerella is my guess.
     
  12. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

    Good cleanup, Jay.

    IDENTIFICATIONS

    Lifestage: subimago/dun (jwg)
    Order common name: Mayflies (jwg)
    Order taxonomic name: Ephemeroptera (Travis Bille)
    Family common name: Small Squaregill Mayflies (jwg)
    Family taxonomic name: Caenidae (Bob Newman)
    Genus taxonomic name: ???
    Gender: female (jwg)
     
  13. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

    Welcome aboard, Etamaman. Although this mayfly does have three tails in its dun and spinner lifestages, a trait it does shares with Ephemerrelids (members of family Ephemerellidae), if you look a the wings, you will notice that this mayfly doesn't have hind wings, and all Ephemerellids (including genus Ephemerella) do have hind wings.
     
  14. jwg

    jwg Active Member

    Genus taxonomic name: Caenis

    common name: Whitewinged Sulphur

    great challenge.

    Jay
     
  15. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

    Good job, Jay.

    IDENTIFICATIONS

    Lifestage: subimago/dun (jwg)
    Order common name: Mayflies (jwg)
    Order taxonomic name: Ephemeroptera (Travis Bille)
    Family common name: Small Squaregill Mayflies (jwg)
    Family taxonomic name: Caenidae (Bob Newman)
    Genus common name: Whitewinged Sulphur (jwg)
    Genus taxonomic name: Caenis (jwg)
    Gender: female (jwg)
     
  16. tkww

    tkww Member

    I'll be durned. Had no idea about this mayfly. Lakes only? Is slow moving water OK? Should I be surprised that I've never seen one?​
     
  17. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

    tkww-

    Caenis mayflies live in both lakes and streams. However, I have only encountered them once. It was many years ago at Dry Falls Lake. My fishing partner and I had returned his vehicle. This was at dusk, and we discovered tiny mayflies on the vehicle's vertical surfaces. Within seconds of landing, the dun would start shedding its skin. The process appeared to take less than a minute, following which. the spinner would fly off, often with its shed exoskeleton still partially attached at the tails.

    In any event, this was in the very early stages of my entomology self-education, and I wasn't even sure what kind of mayflies they were. However, I collected several in plastic sandwich bag, and was able to identify them after returning home, and being able to view them with adequate lighting and 10x magnification. They are really tiny, only about 3 mm in body length.