Area 11-9/29

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Jake Bannon, Sep 29, 2007.

  1. Me and Clint F had hit a local beach today mainly targeting estruary salmon. We had fished a few hours and I had finally picked up a good sized coho around the 4lb range, not huge but it put up a good fight on a 5wt. Not more than 10min later I had brought a nice cutt to hand around the 16in range on an epoxy headed baitfish.

    We couldnt fish much longer because it had seemed that the trible netters taking a break about a 100ys away had seen me catch that silver so they decided to put their nets out. We were fishing just about inside their net, once they had pulled it up there were at least a hundred fish mixed of coho, chum and cutts. They had let me look in their bins about 2 hours prior to when I caught the coho and they had kept 5-7cutts, a couple that were around the 25in range. I couldt believe the biggest cutthroat Ive ever layed eyes on were dead in an Indian net boat. I thought they couldnt net on weekends but I may be wrong.

    Jake
     
  2. Nice report Jake and what a shameful act for those people that claim that they are the keepers of the land.
     
  3. I saw some Indian netters come in late this afternoon too, so it seems they can net on the weekends. Had a bunch of nice coho.
     
  4. great report Jake!
    I know excatly what beach you are talking about and those fish definately have lockjaw. Not sure why some estuaries have fish that will hit & others that have fish that won't:confused:
    I fish many beaches this time of year & have found several that you can fish and hook up all day long, while other beaches are teaming with hundreds of fish and they just won't touch a thing!

    As for the situation with the tribal gillnets capturing & killing those beautiful fish as well as the issues with the snaggers...
    The best way to combat these types of problems is to join in the community effort to restore fisheries and help out by volunteering your time. Groups in your area include Trout Unlimited as well as many other worthy organizations.
    You might also talk with one of your teachers about a field trip to one of the local hatcheries as they are are fully operational right now processing salmon.

    The fact that these issues with gillnetters & snaggers bother you so much means that you have pride and integrity. The fact that you use your real name next to your avatar means that you have confidence in yourself. Finally the fact that you are involved in a forum like this and are interested in fly-fishing to begin with means that you have an adventurous spirit!
    Within this forum there is a link to a section titled "events" Keep an eye on this and find out what you can do to get involved on a personal level to help restore fish resources and environment and become aware of opportunities to meet people like yourself. Usually these endeavors lead to new freindships and new adventures and ultimately will instill an even stronger sense of pride & accomplishment in yourself.
    In the end you will realize that the unscrupulous practices of the few are outweighed by the majority of people who strive to make a difference.
    Tight lines Buddy!
    -Luke
     
  5. Phew... now I finally realized why I lack such self confidence! No real name next to my avatar. :)
     
  6. Thanks Luke, I will definitly look into the programs. I also think I will maybe talk to my Biology teacher about a trip to Minter Creek hatchery which is pretty colse.
     
  7. Which tribe was fishing are 11, but the South Sound area 13 Squaxin regulations clearly state that all cuuthroat must be released:

    8. Beach seines must release all cutthroat trout captured unharmed in all fisheries. Cutthroat populations in local streams are currently at very low levels. Conservation measures directed towards incidental catches in Tribal coho fisheries and local recreational fisheries are necessary to allow Area 13D-K cutthroat stocks to rebuild.
     
  8. most tribal fisheries must be patrolled by their own law enforcement... and well there isnt always much of that... its a shame!
     
  9. suquamish trash more than likely
     
  10. Jake,
    Nice job on the silver. Sorry to hear about those great cutts getting netted. I bet some of those fish were 8 to 10 years old.
    Brian
     
  11. Take pictures of the Cutts. A sad memory, but this is evidence of illegal activity. I bust out my camera all the time when some one is snagging, fishing closed waters, and this is a deterrent with a huge lens zoomed right in on them.
     
  12. Sadly, try 15 years old for a 20 inch+ SRC.
     
  13. I caught a huge SRC (maybe 20+? I didn't tape him) a few weeks ago near an estuary in the south sound that gets hit hard with nets. He had a giant net mark - just barely escaped!
     
  14. The biggest cutthroat I ever saw was in a gillnet on the Nisqually River.

    "That which exists is allowed" John C. Lilly

    :mad:

    JonB
     
  15. Yeah, the trouble is that nets select out only the largest of the cutts, with the smaller ones being able to pass through the mesh. Lex, I think 15 years is a bit excessive. From what I know, Bull Trout are the longest lived fish in PS and I dont think they typically even reach 15 years old.
     
  16. Well try telling them that. All they'll do is smile at you and either throw it in their boat or if it's dead just throw it on shore to feed the seagulls.
     
  17. Actually your longer living teleosts that reside in the Puget Sound are your rock fish & lings that can live beyond 20 years.
     
  18. I've been told that a 20 year ling or cabezon is a relatively young fish... anyone?
     

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