Bamboo Exclusively?

Discussion in 'Bamboo, Fiberglass & Classic Reels' started by Greg Armstrong, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. hbbambooflyrods

    hbbambooflyrods New Member

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    Muchas gracias Kenneth por la invitacion al Classic fly rod forumm
    Saluda cordialmente HBAGES
     
  2. Greg Armstrong

    Greg Armstrong Active Member

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    I've had Dennis Stone (he's in Oregon) do some repairs for me and was pleased with his work.
    Just google "Dennis Stone bamboo" and you'll find his website and contact info'.
    Curious to know more about your bamboo rod. What have you got?
     
  3. Joe Goodfellow

    Joe Goodfellow Active Member

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    Hey Greg it says on the reel seat union hardware company Torrington. Conn. U.S.A. Its 8'6" long 3 piece has 2 tips has red guide wraps. Some of the varnish has peeled off some guides missing. It's a little ruff but looks like in the right hands it can become new again
     
  4. Greg Armstrong

    Greg Armstrong Active Member

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    It's nice to know who owned it, and his Dad before him way back in the '20's!
    So many of the rods we come across we know so little about, at least you know who fished that one. It's cool you've got some history on it.
    It sounds like it could be a nice rod in a good length. Get it fixed up and take it fishing again, I'm sure the prior owners would most likely want it that way.
     
  5. Joe Goodfellow

    Joe Goodfellow Active Member

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    Heck ya i can't wait I've waited to long.
     
  6. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    As a sidebar to this thread, I joined some friends to fish a tree farm lake that opened this past Saturday. My arsenal for the day included three vintage cane rods of 50-, 40- and 30-years old, respectively. They couldn't have been more different from each other, yet each was an absolute blast to fish for cutts and brookies from about 9" to 15" long. I'm still grinning!

    K
     
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  7. Mike Monsos

    Mike Monsos AKA flyman219

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    I was up on the farm with Kent that day and had the pleasure of "getting to know" one of his vintage bamboo rods, a nice 8' taper from Orvis, the "99". I really liked the action of this 6 wt. rod. After landing my share of the Bows, Brooks and Cutts I have this taper on the short list for rods to make a copy of. The more rods you cast, the more rods you find that you like. It's a steep and slippery slope.

    Mike
     
  8. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

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    Old thread, but maybe worth reviving.

    I'm on the hunt for my first bamboo rod, but I don't know if it's for me. As some on here know well, after being pounded with questions, (thanks Randy and Tom especially), I'm a recent glass convert and have sold all but four of my quality graphite rods, but have retained 4-5 plastic travel rods. I don't even bring plastic with me any more for the most part--loving glass.

    Maybe it's just a natural progression, but cane is starting to interest me. What I'm questioning now is the appropriateness of cane, given that 90% of my fishing is in a pontoon or boat in stillwater, and 80% of that is using a sinking line. I'm not sure that a relatively light 5-6 wt. cane rod is appropriate for either sinking lines or keeping the tip in the water while moving?

    In addition, there's a cost factor. For a starter cane rod, I could have a beautiful Epic or Kabuto and I KNOW I'd love and use those. So, my question is largely directed toward those that have used both glass and cane in stillwater with wet flies or streamers, and how you think they stack up, all things considered. Thanks!
     
  9. para_adams

    para_adams Active Member

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    I generally like my bamboo rods much better on the stream than on the lake, but I do enjoy my 8-1/2' Phillipson on the lake because its got a combination of lightness, power and length for lakes. My other bamboo rods are all awesome but not well-suited to lakes…too short, too slow or too heavy.

    I fish graphite about half the time on lakes, half the time on larger rivers and never on small streams. Maybe that's why I find myself dreaming lately of small stream fishing and it's always with the bamboo rod.
     
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  10. Randall Clark

    Randall Clark Active Member

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    I still have one bamboo rod. Alas, it doesn't get fished because I broke it doing something stupid. Repairable? Probably because the break was pretty clean just below a ferrule...I need to get it repaired...would probably make a good streamer rod. I haven't yet had the heart to even take it out of the tube since that fateful day, it's just too depressing and makes me feel like an idiot. So, for now I'll have to settle for glass which I enjoy immensely.
     
  11. Lugan

    Lugan Joe Streamer

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    I like at least 8'6" rods on stillwater, and a cane rod that long starts to get slow and heavy. Heck, the only glass rod I'd consider for stillwater would be an Epic 686 or maybe a Steffen in the same configuration, and even then it wouldn't be my first choice. You could spring for a long cane Wojnicki, Karstetter, Reams, etc., to get a light and responsive long cane rod, but now you're into $3,000+ territory. This is why I still use a 9'0" 5wt or 6wt fast graphite on stillwater.
     
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  12. Krusty

    Krusty Krusty Old Effer

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    Perhaps because I fished cane as a young man they hold no attraction for me. I didn't miss them when I went to glass, and even less so when graphite came out. And, as an added bonus, I would absolutely shit myself breaking, or even scratching the damn thing. Too much like taking a beautiful museum piece into the field....and I know, without fail, it would get dropped, banged around, and be subject to undeserved abuse.
     
  13. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

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    I just sprung for a fairly inexpensive cane rod, a 6 wt. for some universality, so we'll see how it does. It if breaks it's not a huge deal. If I love it, I'll probably go to a Sweetgrass Mantra. Betting I won't. Glass seems to be a great medium point for me. I'm learning that vintage glass doesn't interest me much, but modern glass does, and it's pretty versatile and certainly appropriate for stillwater IMO. In April we'll likely be getting some 8-12lb. trout during our annual stillwater trip to a private ranch. That should be a pretty good test for one or two of the Steffens.
     
  14. Troutcreek

    Troutcreek Active Member

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    7' 3wt hollow bamboo fly rod with a lake lunker.....
    P1000377-2.JPG
     
  15. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

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    On lakes my most often used cane rods are an early 1950's 9' 3pc Phillipson that may be heavy compared to other materials but it sure isn't slow. I use it when I think I might have to switch to a sinking line as it handles both a 5wt floater and full sink. It could also easily cast a 6wt. I have never found the weight of this rod to be a hindrance.

    The other is an 8ft 2pc Constable Empress. Its quite light for an 8 footer. I use it with a 5wt floater but it is also comfortable with a 4wt. It is overworked by a full sink and I don't like sink tips.

    I wouldn't hesitate to use rods from 6'9" to 7'6" on lakes.

    Once in a blue moon I will use a 1970's Orvis graphite 9ft for 5wt.

    TC
     
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  16. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

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    Tim, your entire collection seems to be vintage and a wonderful throwback. Thanks for that, always enjoy seeing what the guys who know their cane do.
     
  17. Greg Armstrong

    Greg Armstrong Active Member

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    I usually take two bamboo rods out when on my pontoon and usually it's with my 1940's Granger 8'-6" (Victory model 8642) with a sinking line along with an 8' Homer Jennings contemporary rod with a floater. Both rods are 5 weights. I haven't found the weight of either to be a detriment.
     
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  18. Mark Walker

    Mark Walker Active Member

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    I fish predominantly glass with the occasional bamboo. Dollar wise, I have no bamboo costing over a grand each, but several of the glass are. I had a pure hoot fishing a $30 Eagle Claw Featherweight in beaver ponds in Colorado last year. For most people, including me, rod/gear cost is an issue. Unless you're loaded with unlimited dough, of course.
    Would I like to have a $12000 bamboo rod? I dunno. I do know over the years I've grown quite fond of my testicles and where they are, as opposed to hanging from a sharp stick in the front yard where I've been informed they'll be if I bought one.
    Fish what you like, what you can afford without costing yourself a fishing trip, and fish more often.
     
  19. Greg Armstrong

    Greg Armstrong Active Member

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    Mark,

    You portray a vivid and rather somber image of your front yard ...!

    I also mostly have lower end bamboo rods commonly referred to as "blue collar" rods. I've got a couple that are worth a little more, but I really enjoy fishing with those rods that my Grandfather and Great Uncles' (along with one from my Great Aunt Peggy!) fished with. I have a few of those that were passed down to me which sparked my interest in learning and fishing with a variety of bamboo almost all the time now.

    A $12,000 rod would have to be some kind of extraordinary holy grail find to cost even half as much. Most guys are surprised that a really good bamboo rod can be purchased for much less than a lot of new graphite rods they're using today. Ray Gould made me aware of that and I'm glad he did.
     
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  20. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

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    Genitalia Avenue does not appeal to me either. Greg, do you have a couple of examples, private or public, of the cane rods that are< good graphite? Thanks!