BC Lakes Report

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Rob Blomquist, Jul 29, 2001.

  1. Rob Blomquist

    Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

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    Location:
    Mountlake Terrace, WA, USA.
    Last week, my brother and I fished in the Nehalliston Plateau area of BC, which is served by BC Highway 24 between Little Fort and 100 Mile House. We got to Little Fort on Monday evening, and spent the night camped in town. It is a really little town, so camping in town is not that big a deal. We hit the Little Fort Fly Shop at 9am and got recommendations on where to fish, and picked up a few flies. This is one great fly shop for nearly the middle of the wilderness, and I bet that everyone needing anything would be satisfied there. Not to mention, but they have an awful lot of polar bear hair for the discriminating fly tyer. Not that I smuggled any in, you understand.

    From there, we trekked up on to the plateau, dropping in at Peaceful Cove resort, where we ended up staying in a cabin. From there, we relyed on the info from the owner, as Peaceful Cove is a fly fishing resort first, and lure draggers, bait drowners second. We fished Crystal lake that afternoon in a pretty good wind, and had no strikes, but we found the first of the shoals that are so significant to these lakes.

    Wednesday we fished Lorenzo and Bear Paw lakes taking many small trout, and one sucker on a myriad of flies. We saw a small mid-day caddis hatch, and had callibaetus fluttering about to little commotion from the fish all day. My brother missed one which seemed significant, maybe 12"+. It again was windy a good part of the day. In the evening we were employed to paddle our canoe across Lac des Roches to a shoal on the opposite side in order to see on of the great sedge hatches that we had been expecting, which we did, and there was none to speak of, and we paddled in after dark.

    On Thursday morning we hit Wilson Lake, where we found fish to be rising right off, and they turned out to be suckers. Desperate we played with them for awhile and split to Fawn Lake (near Sheridan Lake) and fished the afternoon away in the wind, to find some small fish crusing the shallows in the shade as the sun started lowering around dinner. As the sky got darker, the wind faded, and fish started rising all over the lake, but not concentrated enough to cast to without serious frustration. We paddled to the west end of the lake where a good tule bed is, and found a few fish rising along the edge in about 3 feet of semi-cloudy water. I cast a elk hair caddis at one rise, and got a strike, and felt a good fish break off an instant later. We fished the hatch until we finally got frustrated with the failing light, lack of any fly grease (I had left my vest at the cabin), and nature's call.

    Friday, our last day fishing, we were offered a boat and motor by the resort, gratis, and we were directed to fish the biggest shoal on des Roches which we did all afternoon and evening. The fishing was off until about 4 pm when giant sedges started hatching during calm periods. If the wind would hold off, some fish would start to rise, but wind would pick up before the rise was strong enough to fish. during this hatch, I fished the Mikulak Sedge, and Jim the October Caddis, a similar steelhead pattern. during our waits, we let our well greased flys sit on the water, ready to be casted at a moments notice. The terns and small gulls that were on the lake also took an interest in the hatch and our flies. It became a challenge to get our flies away from the birds when they raided the shoal. A heavy rain started, killing the sedge hatches, but the fish seemed to shift to callibaetus that continued to rise for awhile. I lost a gulper special to one of these fish when the knot failed.

    We left Saturday morning in a pretty hard rain, and found that although we did not catch anything of bragging rights, we did have an excellent time, saw incredible numbers of loons, fished very lightly impacted lakes, and found a new spot to fish, and learned about the great sedge hatches of BC. I will be back, and it may be as soon as fall.
    --
    Rob Blomquist
    Kirkland, WA

    Gone to the penguins...Bye, bye, Billy-boy....
     

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