Beach Rod Advice

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by aplTyler, May 5, 2013.

  1. aplTyler

    aplTyler Inept Steelheader

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    I've decided to make the leap into a beach rod. I have an old Redington 6 wt CPS 9'0" that is a freshwater model and while I know that I could make that work with a good cleaning/dry out after each use, it isn't ideal. The fact that I'm nearly 2 hours from the nearest beach makes me a bit wary about the purchase, but with the Pink invasion coming this summer and my job taking me to the Puget Sound area often, I can't bear to not be rigged and ready for Sea-Runs, Resident Coho, and Pinks.

    I'm primarily looking at two rods. The newer 9' 6 wt Redington Predator or a 9'6" 6 wt. Sage Response saltwater model. I've cast the Response and I liked it for bombing out an Outbound line. It seems to have good distance ability and I'm sure the Predator is a bomber too. Do I need the extra 6" off the beach? Any thoughts on these rods with an Outbound Intermediate? Pinks and Sea-Runs?

    The issue becomes (as usual) price. I want the rod I choose to have other applications and abilities. I have a full arsenal of trout sticks 3-6 wt plus a 7 wt Summer Steelhead stick and a nice little two handed quiver. That said, I still don't like having rods that don't get used.

    Any thoughts or recommendations would be great!
     
  2. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    What's your 7 wt stick? If I was going to go with a single rod for such occasions I'd think hard about a 7 wt. 6 is fine for pinks and most silvers but you'll appreciate the extra beef when the wind picks up. Plus you can throw heavy flies and land fish quicker. Just a thought.

    I fish a 10' rod off the beach a lot and I really like the extra length to help save a sloppy back cast
     
  3. aplTyler

    aplTyler Inept Steelheader

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    I have an old custom made (not by me or for me...) Winston Biix 9'6 7wt. It is definitely not saltwater safe though based on the components/reel seat/construction. I've put the hurt on steelhead that hit over 10 lbs on it though. Very soulful blank (as most Winston Rods are IMO).
     
  4. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    Would be a sweet beach rod I'm sure. Maybe spend the money on a salty reel and an outbound short instead. All rods need rinsing after a salt trio or eventually they will see wear from the salt. In my experience anyway. So you'll want to rinse off whatever you use when you get home anyway, so it not having salt specific components isn't a huge deal.
    Or go after that salty six and keep the Winston as a backup for windy days
     
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  5. Patrick Gould

    Patrick Gould Active Member

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    I had an 8wt Predator, but it was a little to stiff and heavy for my casting style. Looking back I think If I had lined it with an outbound short I might have liked it better. It's got ton of power and is the kind of rod that doesn't put limits on how fast you can get the line moving if you're a skilled caster.
     
  6. formerguide

    formerguide Active Member

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    Honestly, I think a Redington CPS 9' 6wt would make an excellent beach rod. Only the lack of an all-aluminum reel seat and small fighting butt distinguishes it from the comparable CPS saltwater model. You should rinse any rod after beach use as it is.

    The CPS was light and easy to cast if I recall, IMO... I think there's a lot of unnecessary gnashing of teeth over rod choice.

    $.02

    Dan
     
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  7. Mark Mercer

    Mark Mercer Member

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    Save your money!!! I agree with formerguide your CPS 6wt should work just fine for everything you're after. I good rinse after, and it'll be fine. It'll be a good beach rod just the way it is.
     
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  8. aplTyler

    aplTyler Inept Steelheader

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    Fair enough. I'll give it a shot as is. I have an Outbound WF6I line that I'll try on it... should jack for sure.
     
  9. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    I'd get an Outbound short for the 7 weight for pinks. The 6 is great for cutts and resident coho.
     
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  10. aplTyler

    aplTyler Inept Steelheader

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    When you guys say a good rinse, what's your standard protocol for cleaning a rod after salt use? Same for the reel... I'll be using a Bauer LM3 on the reel end.
     
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  11. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    I'm a huge slacker when it comes to rinsing my gear. To be completely honest, from the day Area 9 opens up I will have an 8 wt and a 6 wt rigged and ready at all times in my truck. I do alot of before/after work fishing, and hate taking the time to rig up for each short outing. If I happen to think about it I'll pull them out and give them a quick rinse with the hose, but that's about it. I give them a more thorough cleaning when I put them away at the end of the season. Granted, my rods/reels are designed for the salt. If I was using a freshwater setup I'm sure I couldn't get away with that.
     
  12. Bruce Baker

    Bruce Baker Active Member

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    In regard to your reel, I remember a post made by Ed Call in which he had mentioned that he brought a container with fresh water along on his trips and put his reel in after fishing and for the drive home.
    Maybe buy something like SaltX and spray your equipment after fishing or a spray bottle or two with water to give the rod a quick rinse when done.
     
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  13. Mark Mercer

    Mark Mercer Member

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    I've used fresh water gear for years in the salt and have never had a problem, but I take very good care of my stuff.
    Rod gets taken apart, rinsed and wiped down and set out to dry. Reel gets spool taken off, placed in the sink with warm water and a little soap, let soak for ten or fifteen minutes, rinse and set out to dry. Thats it.... of course the sooner the better after leaving the salt but sometimes that doesn't happen and I've still had no problems.
     
  14. Dipnet

    Dipnet The wanted posters say Tim Hartman

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  15. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm not much of a fly angler, but I type pretty well.

    I have a red plastic coffee can with a lid. During beach fishing outings, that can is in my rig. When I'm done, I'll separate my rod sections and stand the butt section and reel in that can while I use a wet microfiber cloth to wipe down the other rod sections. Once wiped down with the wet microfiber, I then use a dry microfiber and place these sections into the rod sock. I then separate my reel from the butt section, dropping the reel and any spare spools back into the water can. I then go over the butt section like the other rod section I then add it to the rod sock and place this into the tube without putting on the cap. This protects it for the drive home, but once home I will pull the sock out and set it all on a shelf to fully dry. If I skimped on the rinsing at all, I repeat in my deep sink in the garage.

    All flies used in the salt get thrown into the can too. When I get home they come out of the water can, and get rinsed in running water. Then I lay them out on the shelf to dry at home. Before using them next time I'll check to make sure they are rust free and sharp, fluff the materials and put them back in the box.

    The reel(s) and spool(s) all ride home from my local beaches in the water can. After the flies are done, I remove the reels and spools, set them in the deep sink, dump out the water can, rinse the water can and then refill the water can for the next time, placing it next to my beach gear kit. The spools that are still on reels get removed, rinsed in gentle running water and then all get set on an absorbent old bath towel to fully dry. If the next day is not a fishing outing day, on my way to my rig for work or errands I'll turn or flip the reels/spools to allow them to continue to dry.

    Probably way too much activity here, but I fish so rarely these days that it feels good to mess with my gear after a rare outing. (go ahead, make jokes)

    This is pretty much what I do. I've never used any additives. I've never damaged any reels (except for my very first Okuma that predated my freshwater rinsing routine, and that reel paid the ultimate sacrifice for my mismanagement and lack of attention to care and detail). Now I'm good to go!
     
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  16. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    Sounds like a solid system, Ed. But just a plain old red coffee container? No self respecting fly fisherman would be caught dead using anything but the new Simms Fresh Rinse container with the brook trout graphics!
     
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  17. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh, and did I forget to mention that you should fish that 6wt CPS for sure. Maybe the pinks will cause you some trouble, maybe not. I know many fishy folks that put a lot of pinks and coho on the beach with a 6wt rod. Prefer an AF 40+, Ambush, Outbound, Outbound short type line, extreme weight forward head, aim high and let it fly...using a stripping basket of course.

    Plastic coffee can with nifty sealing lid...never seen one of those in a Simms catalog...yet!
     
  18. aplTyler

    aplTyler Inept Steelheader

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    Thanks for all of the advice. I'm going to let 'er rip with the rig I have. I have an Outbound Short WF6S1 (the hover/slow sink line). If it doesn't produce, I'll pick up the intermediate faster sink version. I think it'll do though.
     
  19. Bagman

    Bagman Active Member

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    I
    I'm very new to this whole fly fishing seen so I can very easily be corrected, but. I would not make my second choose a fast sinking line. I would pick up a rio outbound WF6F. My reasoning being a lot of the fishing you will be doing is shallowish water fairly close to shore. The fast sinking line is just going to put your fly and your line on the bottom which is not where you want it.
     
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  20. Derek Young

    Derek Young 2011 Orvis Endorsed Fly Fishing Guide Of The Year

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    I picked up the new H2 9'6" 6wt SW a few weeks ago, and being impressed with that rod I'm even more so with the line I paired it with. Orvis has a new line named the "Bank Shot" with a great profile for throwing Leland's popper, Bob's Chum Baby, and some other "secret" stuff I've come up with. A tip-flex rod with a shooting head-design line has become my set-up of choice.
     
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