Boat Features, Fly Fishing, Puget Sound

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by jsuyes, Nov 3, 2007.

  1. Roger Stephens

    Roger Stephens Active Member

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    JR:

    I use an adjustable fiberglass painters pole which will not corrode for a poling pole. When it is collapsed, it is about 4 1/2 ft. long and easy to stow.

    Roger
     
  2. johnnyrockfish

    johnnyrockfish Member

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    Roger - thanks for the tip.

    MartyG - maybe I've seen too many marketing photos of Whalers cut into two or three pieces and still floating so I believe that they aren't sinkable. Apparently you've seen one sink. I'd like to hear that story.

    [​IMG]
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  3. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    Rigid Bottom Inflatable (the inflatable boats with hard bottoms).
     
  4. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    That scenario is obviously in fairly ideal conditions. In breaking waves, yes the boat will probably be at least partially submerged and likely not stable enough to be of any use. In reality though, in those conditions the Whaler is going to do better than almost anything else out there. I'd rather be clinging to a few pieces of partially submerged fiberglass and foam than a chunk of aluminum floundering two feet under water and only being held afloat by a bit of styrofoam.
     
  5. johnnyrockfish

    johnnyrockfish Member

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    I think it's been since the late 70's or early 80's that all boats under a certain length are required to have level flotation, so theoretically all these boats are "unsinkable".

    Prudence at sea should keep you out of the worst situations. One thing the coast guard drills into your heads is the importance of staying with the boat even if it capsizes. That's a good thing to keep in mind. It makes it easier to spot for rescue and you may be able to get back on top of it. etc.

    Safe boating to everyone. Wear your pfd's and carry a good anchor and plenty of line.

    JR
     
  6. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Free Man

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    You're always going to have to make some compromises, but the basic concerns are: a low free board, for effective casting, stripping and landing fish, big enough for the number of people you'll have in the boat most of the time, a clear deck and rails to reduce the line snagging. You will want a bow anchor, and an auxiliary motor of some kind. I definitely appreciate my gps when it gets foggy, but a hand held will save your butt with out the expense of an installed unit. I have both vhf and a cell phone on board, but you can get some sweet hand held vhf radios later if you think you need it.

    How big of water will you be going out in? How much range do you need? What's your budget? What else will you use the boat for, and what do you see yourself doing in 5 five years? What do you tow with, and how often will you really use it? I sold boats for a living for years, and these are the first questions I always asked.

    All that said, I am very satisfied with my 15' Whaler Dauntless. Center console, bow mounted anchor. That puts the riptide troll motor, and a gas kicker aft, which doesn't work as well as a bow mount (except I put it on an extension bracket for more purchase) but you want to have at least one end of the boat clean enough for distance casting in the wind. 60 hp injected 4stroke with 15 gals of fuel give me gobs of range, and with the weight of the hull, it is a real kidney saver in the short order chop we get in the sound, and on nasty days I feel very secure, as this model is self bailing. I've taken some nasty green water over the bow, but all I have to do is snivel and wait for it to drain.

    There's some really good advice on this post, and boat show season is coming right up, so your timing is just about perfect. If you don't go new, the dealerships get a lot of sweet deals in on trades that they'll want to get rid of in February and March.

    happy hunting
     

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