Boat Novice Advice

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by JE, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. JE Active Member

    Posts: 287
    Great NW
    Ratings: +50 / 0
    My father in law is looking for a fishing boat to take the grand kids out in and broaden some horizons for our fishing as well. We're thinking bigger lakes, crabbing and Searun excursions. A buddy thought a 16ft Lund w a 15-25 hp motor would do the trick. Any thoughts re advice on storage, upkeep unknowns for folks that are new to the game? Thanks.
    -JE
  2. zen leecher aka bill w born to work, forced to fish

    Posts: 3,129
    Moses Lake, WA
    Ratings: +957 / 1
    Get a swing tongue trailer. They fit better in a garage.
  3. ken2cross Member

    Posts: 115
    Lake Stevens, Wa
    Ratings: +13 / 0
    Some outboard manufacturers I'm told now don't recommend flushing a motor used in salt water.
    That's a recipe for disaster. Just make sure your flush adapter works well so you don't starve the water pump.
    Always flush when you've been in the salt.

    Buy a 4 stroke motor. Way better range on the amount of gas you carry, sounds quieter, starts easier, no messing with outboard oil, and spark plugs don't foul.

    It sounds like a pretty good setup to me. Just make sure it can plane with the load it's likely to carry because Puget Sound and Hood Canal are huge when going slow.
    I have a sail boat and it requires significant time to transit to fishing or crabbing grounds.
    Ken
  4. ken2cross Member

    Posts: 115
    Lake Stevens, Wa
    Ratings: +13 / 0
    I should have said galvanized or aluminum trailer. Painter steel is just terrible in salt water.
  5. PT Physhicist

    Posts: 3,531
    Edmonds, WA
    Ratings: +699 / 2
    JE, sounds like you're in the right ballpark. Lunds are nice, as are a bunch of other boats. I'm partial to the Duroboat line. Here's one for referance. A 16' aluminum is a great size for multiple uses.

    http://seattle.craigslist.org/tac/boa/2931454447.html

    If you're going to use 'em in the salt, flush 'em/rinse 'em with freshwater. Just saying.
  6. LCnSac Active Member

    Posts: 503
    Sacramento, CA
    Ratings: +111 / 0
    You can go small with a 13' Boston Whaler and know your boat is capable, but are you? It's a wet boat with not much room but it will get you home safely. A 15 or 17 is even better. There are plenty of good 17' Montauks around for under $10K, some re-powered with a 4 stroke. The 15' is a beautiful craft but lateral stability is much less than the 13 or 17.

    Down here, we'd recommend the Bayrunner, now sold under the Klamath name. Klamaths are all welded, durable boats with a hard chine, good freeboard and an upswinging bow, and good resale. Lund is also excellent, but pricey and riveted.
  7. matalpa Member

    Posts: 55
    Mead, WA
    Ratings: +6 / 0
    Visit some boat dealers with everyone in the crew. Then all of you get up in the boat and see what you think of the space on a given boat. I would want a boat with high sides for keeping kids and old people in and seawater out. I would also want something that could do 25 mph with a load in it. Otherwise it takes forever to get anywhere. I would also think about bad weather and how tough the kids are. Somewhere out of the wind can really help people on marginal weather days.

    Good luck with the boat!
  8. Patrick Gould Active Member

    Posts: 2,356
    Ellensburg, WA
    Ratings: +684 / 1
    A used whaler would be great. You really can't do much better than a 17' model with a modern outboard.

    Aluminum boats are fine, but small base model aluminum boats are not so good for the sound. A welded hull, wheel steering, and some wind/spray protection are some items to put on the want list if you're set on going aluminum.
  9. LCnSac Active Member

    Posts: 503
    Sacramento, CA
    Ratings: +111 / 0
    For reference, there is/was a 17' Montauk down here with beautiful cabinet work, actually creating storage which is rare for any Whaler from the Outrage down. It has a nearly new Suzuki 60 in perfect condition. The owner wanted $12K last fall. It's probably gone and those deals with the 4S are not common but they are there. The older Montauk hulls can take a 50-60 HP 4S and do fine, top speed about 30. The newer hulls with a 90 4S top out at 42 mph--and will run you close to $30K new. A new Merc 60 with controls is about $6500 and decent hulls with trailer and an older 2S are $6K - $7K (Bay Area prices and the highest in the nation), so for $12-$14K less the value of the 2S motor you can have a near perfect boat for your use with a new motor and resale will be excellent--far better than anything else I believe.

    Whalers can be found at the lowest prices in Florida, but it's usually all salt use. The best place to find one in great shape is Michigan as it's fresh water and a short season. They are fairly common down here and in the Seattle area too. It's not uncommon for a Whaler buyer to look nationwide for a deal. With a Whaler you can buy a 70s hull and with a survey have confidence your boat is solid and has a good life left. I've had three and loved them all.

    Afterthought: You can buy a new 130 Whaler (2000 and later hull) for $13K or a used one for $8-9K. That is a BIG 13' boat with greater freeboard--much more volume than the classic 13 hull. They will come with either a 25 or 40 4 stroke, and you need the 40 for that hull. A 25 4S is OK for the older hull. That will comfortably fish two, an adult and two kids would be OK, more is too crowded for fishing. Down here both old and new 13s are taken offshore 10-20 miles with a kicker and a radio. The Sound is much calmer so you should feel safe in good weather in either hull. I have made probably 50 runs from Roche Harbor to Sydney in my old 13 without problems.
  10. PT Physhicist

    Posts: 3,531
    Edmonds, WA
    Ratings: +699 / 2
    Whalers are nice but you really don't need one for what you describe. Especially not a 13' Whaler. I owned one and you'd be just as comfortable in a bathtub with 4 people as you would that boat. A 16' Lund, Duroboat, Smokercraft, etc would be a nice boat for 4 people doing what you described. 25hp would push it around ok, 40 hp would be better. Motor is the most expensive part of the boat so make sure to get it checked out first. Good luck and have fun.
  11. Alex MacDonald Dr. of Doomology

    Posts: 3,304
    Haus Alpenrosa, Lederhosenland
    Ratings: +864 / 0
    Lund's are nice boats! You might also look at Smokercraft.
  12. JE Active Member

    Posts: 287
    Great NW
    Ratings: +50 / 0
    Thanks guys. I'll keep you posted if we pull the trigger on something.