Boots?

Discussion in 'Camping, Hiking, Cooking' started by Stewart, May 24, 2011.

  1. Stewart Skunk Happens

    Posts: 950
    Spokane
    Ratings: +48 / 0
    Thanks to impulse purchasing, sales at REI, and an escrow refund, I have been tossing some money at backpacking gear. Still going cheap, but the gear whore won. :thumb:

    My current state of ignorance now revolves around footwear. I like my feet to be protected. I don't want to wet wade in Tevas, but carrying wading boots and wearing hiking boots seems like overkill. I have some Korkers with interchangeable soles, and the Trailwalker soles have never even been used. Is it dumb to contemplate hiking in them? Not gonzo backpacking, but maybe 5 miles one way. Maybe the answer is to just try it...
  2. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,406
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Ratings: +1,359 / 9
    I have hiked that far in my Korkers. Mine fit my feet well and I find them comfortable for all day wear. Not ideal, but if you are used to wearing them for hours on end wading you should find them good enough for now. You can remove the stock insole and put in an insole better suited for miles on a trail if you think it necessary.
  3. Stewart Skunk Happens

    Posts: 950
    Spokane
    Ratings: +48 / 0
    That reply is money! (or bourbon should our paths ever cross)
  4. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,406
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Ratings: +1,359 / 9
    I hope your experience mirrors mine. I can live with my Korkers on short hikes. Glad you are stimulating the economy and getting out on the trails and little blue lines.
  5. wet line New Member

    Posts: 2,313
    Burien, WA, King.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Your footwear is the most critical part of your gear. Bad boots are bad news.

    I would not trust my Korkers much further than I can throw them. I have had many issues with the soles popping out and at critical times.

    Non insulated leather is a good thing in my opinion. I preffer Red Wing as they fit my feet. I know others who preffer Danners. Properly treated leather is good! Get them wet and walk them dry is the rule of thumb. The soles are sewn on and not glued. A big plus in my opinion. My current pair of Red Wings are going on 10 years and still going strong. the uppers are still pliable and the sole is still firmly attached. Though they are due for a retread this year. Yes they cost me about $225 new and another $75 for a re-tread this speing but they have lasted many miles and gone through a lot of water and muck. You get what you pay for in most cases with the exception of Korkers and their catchey convertible sole BS. Maybe the Korkers are fine for light duty use but that is not what I want. I want something I KNOW will be there when I need it 5 or 6 miles from my rig and rough ground to cover.

    Dave
  6. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,406
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Ratings: +1,359 / 9
    Dave, mind sharing the make, model and manufactured year of your disasterous Korkers? I have to three different models of Korkers boots from the current and previous sole interface designs. I'll stand by my willingness to hike 5 miles in them because I've done it more than a few times.
  7. KerryS Ignored Member

    Posts: 6,718
    Sedro Woolley, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1,761 / 0
    Hey Mumbles, I got a pair of Korkers. You can have 'em. I won't wear them anymore. The sole came out while getting into the boat and tripped my sorry old ass head first into the bottom of the boat. Lucky I was only slightly injured but it could have been serious. Once is enough. I learned early in life to never give anybody or anything a second shot.
  8. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,406
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Ratings: +1,359 / 9
    Donate them to some youth group...Jim Riggins and O-Rad have some. I hope WW was there filming that head first thing. I hope you were not hurt seriously. I hope it took you a few seconds to figure out how to hoist your head off the boat bottom. I hope nobody is up there taking shots at you.
  9. Jerry Daschofsky Moderator

    Posts: 7,722
    Graham, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +660 / 5
    Korkers changed the soles I do believe. Has a different clasp system. I know they are different then mine.
  10. KerryS Ignored Member

    Posts: 6,718
    Sedro Woolley, WA, USA.
    Ratings: +1,761 / 0
    Explain to me why I should donate something that tried to kill me to a youth group? I will give the boots to you and you can do with them what you want.
  11. Stewart Skunk Happens

    Posts: 950
    Spokane
    Ratings: +48 / 0
    Wet line, I think footwear is really important. I can say, at least for now, I have no intention of going for $200 hiking boots this year. I totally get the quality issue, but I also like to figure out what I really want before I plunk that kind of money down on hiking boots.

    My Korkers haven't failed me yet, although they got less than average use since I bought them last spring. I'm leaning towards just trying it. Then I'll know. It would be nice to make one pair of boots work for the whole trip. If things work out the way I envision, there will be more time spent fishing than hiking. I've never had an interest in the wading sandals due to the lack of solid foot protection.
  12. wet line New Member

    Posts: 2,313
    Burien, WA, King.
    Ratings: +0 / 0
    Mumbles,
    You are entitlled to your opinion but Kerry and I are entitttled to ours. I will never buy another pair of Korkers!!

    Half of the people responding don't like the Korkers!

    You can hear what YOU want to hear.
    Two people have related bad experiences, Kerry taking a bad fall and I damned near went into a piece of bad water thanks to the sole connection failure. It also failed me going across some side hill stuff on loose footing that just about sent me down a steep hill side. That could have been really bad!

    I will repeat, going into the back country wear the best boot you can afford and carry a second pair of foot wear for other uses. You won't think about cost if you turn an ankle or the sole comes off. And the problem is that if the sole pops loose you will turn an ankle in many situations.

    From experience I can tell you a 10" boot is a good thing. I turned an ankle 6 miles in and thankfully had a full boot to tighten up and hike out. It wasn't fun and it hurt but I had the support to do it. I turned my ankle wearing some ankle high "hiking" light weights while fishing.

    Dave
  13. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,406
    Kitsap Peninsula
    Ratings: +1,359 / 9
    Dave, never did I say you are not entitled to your opinon, nor did I say that to Kerry. If I recall, I merely asked you what version of boots you had that disappointed you so much? I do not disagree about the best footwear possible, I have two pair of hiking boots that have allowed me to enjoy the miles. Stewart said "not gonzo backpacking" which I interpret as not really hard core trail stuff. I realize that some love and others hate just about every piece of gear out there. I was just asking which ones had. You can keep that silent and give me shit for hearing what I want to hear. As for Kerry, I'm glad he was not hurt, but flipping him some shit from time to time is fun. Ed
  14. dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

    Posts: 4,097
    Near the Fjord
    Ratings: +565 / 0
    I sprained my ankle badly on a 7 mile journey once. Cheap boots with poor ankle support is no funny thing. Try walking 7 miles out. Bring plenty of drugs for pain... I highly recommend a good hiking boot with ankle support of course.