NFR But is Saltwater related. Giant Pacific Octopus

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Mark Yoshida, Nov 6, 2012.

  1. "WDFW Director Phil Anderson said the department will consider new rules to preserve the population of giant Pacific octopuses at Seacrest Park near Alki Point, where a 19-year-old scuba diver provoked a public outcry after legally harvesting one of the charismatic animals last week."

    "Charismatic"..................LOL. Interesting, yes. More intelligent than a clam or shrimp? Definitely. "Charismatic"........LOL. Assigning positive, desirable human attributes to a mollusk to gather support against hunting them?? Very politically motivated and often highly effective.

    This issue really should have everyone's attention who enjoys saltwater fishing. I have had four separate incidents in the past 4 years where snorkelers and/or snorkel guides have tried to bully me away from fly fishing reefs that are open to sport fishing with hook and line. They will poke at fish, prod them while they hide in caves and under ledges, dig, step, stand and pollute the reef with sunscreen yet feel no hesitation in attempting to stop MY legal recreation because they feel it interferes with their own.
     
  2. a seattle octopus with an umbrella sipping a latte

    [​IMG]
     
    Pat Lat likes this.
  3. Mingo, if that's true you should counterpoint the emo bullshit they are force feeding wdfw right now. other wise these fucks win out over common sense and legal procedure.




    People, right now they've already have held private meetings with wdfw and are only going to open this to public discussion " after this election cycle". pretty much meaning the general public won't have a clue as to when this will be held until after the fact. here's a quote from the Olympian online;

    OLYMPIA - The director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today announced plans to explore regulatory options for banning the harvest of giant Pacific octopuses off a popular Seattle beach and possibly elsewhere in Puget Sound.

    WDFW Director Phil Anderson said the department will consider new rules to preserve the population of giant Pacific octopuses at Seacrest Park near Alki Point, where a 19-year-old scuba diver provoked a public outcry after legally harvesting one of the charismatic animals last week.

    Under current state rules, divers can harvest one giant Pacific octopus per day in most areas of Puget Sound.

    "The harvesting of this animal has resulted in a strong, negative reaction from the public and the dive community," Anderson said. "We believe this area may merit additional restrictions to enhance the traditional uses of this popular beach."

    Anderson announced the department's plans at the start of a two-day public meeting of the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission, a nine-member governing body that has final authority over most new fishing rules.

    With nearly two-dozen scuba divers in attendance, Anderson outlined several possible options to preserve giant Pacific octopuses, ranging from designating Seacrest Park as a marine protected area to prohibiting hunting the animals anywhere in the state.

    Anderson said WDFW will hold public meetings this winter to hear Washingtonians' thoughts on those options.

    All of the divers who spoke on the issue at the commission meeting supported new regulations prohibiting the harvest of octopuses at Seacrest Park and other popular scuba diving areas.

    Scott Lundy, a member of the Washington Scuba Alliance, presented the commission with a petition signed by 5,000 divers supporting a ban on killing octopuses at Seacrest Park.

    Dylan Mayer, the 19-year-old diver from Seattle who started the controversy, also told the commission he supports a ban on killing octopuses at the park.

    "I didn't know they were so beloved, or I wouldn't have done it," he said.

    While many of the divers called for an immediate ban at Seacrest Park, Anderson said Washington law requires state agencies to follow an established public process for developing new regulations.

    "If the conservation of a species or the public welfare is at stake, we can take emergency action," he said. "But the killing of the giant Pacific octopus last week appears to be an isolated case at Seacrest Park, and the species appears to be healthy throughout Puget Sound."

    He added, however, that the department may still consider taking emergency action if another octopus is taken from the area.


    I've watched this too. The youngster may or may not have displayed poor judgment in using that are for harvest. But it was the personal safety factor involved that led him to decide to harvest in the waters he is most familiar and safest in.

    Before you ( diver sympatico membership) get ready to harass this guy further, you might want to go read this:

    http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=77.15.210

    And, if you think that GPO stocks are depleted based on diver reports, read these.

    http://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/01384/2012-13_general_info.pdf

    http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/refm/stocks/plan_team/resources/2008_Nov_BSAIPTminutes.pdf

    http://depts.washington.edu/uwconf/2005psgb/2005proceedings/papers/P1_ANDER.pdf
     
  4. Mingo, before this gets misconstrued, I am not aiming this at you. Am going back to edit it so the rest of the reading public understands it is meant for them. I understand where you are coming from and only direct the first sentence your way as a reply to the fine print in your post.
     
  5. Indeed. But I have to hand it to the SCUBA folks though when it comes to getting their point to go viral. Perhaps we need describe the qualities of wild steelhead in more self-actualized terms, like the way a wild fish is so much more "spontaneous", "engaging" and "resourceful" compared to their hatchery cousins.
     
  6. What is a GPO?

    Resourceful...
    Indignant...
    Anti-hominid

     

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