Caddis or Mayfly?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Entomology' started by Cougar Zeke, May 10, 2014.

  1. Cougar Zeke

    Cougar Zeke Active Member

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    I was fishing at Pass Lake yesterday and noticed these under a cedar tree along the shoreline.

    I initially thought they were mayflies. They were dancing around quite a bit and appeared to be flying upside down! Upon closer examination, what I thought were their tails were actually their antenna pointed up above their wings.

    They had 4 wings and were black. Please see the attached pictures.

    Thanks!
    Andy
     

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  2. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Andy-

    Assuming this

    [​IMG]

    is the insect to which you are referring, it's a caddisfly of family Leptoceridae (Longhorned case maker). They were most likely Mystacides alafimbriatus (Black Dancer).
     
  3. Cougar Zeke

    Cougar Zeke Active Member

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    Thanks Roger! I appreciate the info!

    I'm a noob on the entomology front and welcome the info. I'll see if I can tie up something that will entice the trout since they had no interest in my Griffith Gnats.
     
  4. Teenage Entomologist

    Teenage Entomologist Gotta love the pteronarcys.

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    I've seen those Caddis at Lake Almanor in the summer here in California.
     
  5. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Hmm. I'm having some second thoughts concerning the genus, because they don't seem dark enough, and seem too early to be Mystacides. They may actually be Oecetis (Longhorned Sedge).
     

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