Canon EOS60D w/ 18-200mm ??

Discussion in 'Photography / Video' started by freestoneangler, Oct 29, 2011.

  1. freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

    Posts: 3,965
    Edgewood, WA
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    First post on this forum. I'm buying a camera for my wife and we're pretty well narrowed down to the EOS 60D + 18-200mm kit at Costco for $1200. I'm not a camera buff and my wife is really accomplished at photography, but not the technical aspects of it...creative parts. She's been using the Panasonic FZ30 for the past several years and it takes really nice pictures for a point & shoot. She sells images on the web and has lost sales because they cannot be enlarged big enough for some customers. Don't really want to jump into the cost of full frame digital and from everything we've read, the DSLR's in the EOS 60D class will provide a significant jump in image quality at large size prints. I have a buddy at work who is a Nikon addict and he's recommending this camera (what he'd buy if he was not already invested).

    Anyone on the forum who owns this camera/lens (or the 18-135mm) that can share some feedback would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Bill
  2. Dustin Bise Active Member

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    Any mid range prosumer SLR is gonna be a big step up. I dont prefer 18-200 lenses, but the price is right and they do a good job + cut down on what you need to carry/make it so u dont have to change lenses often, but you do give up some image quality with them.

    You may want to consider getting a 18-70mm lense for now, and plan to upgrade ur lenses down the line as she makes more income off the photos. In my ideal nikon world, i would have a 18-35mm, 50mm 1.4, 100mm macro, and a 70-200 telephoto and a 1.4x teleconverter..

    With that said, you will be very happy with a d60 and either the 18-135 or 18-200. And since the d60 isnt a full frame sensor, your image quality with the kit lense will appear better, as these lense fall off with sharpness on the edge of the frame when using full frame.
  3. freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

    Posts: 3,965
    Edgewood, WA
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    Thanks Dustin. We do realize the tele-zoom lens are a compromise and, as you have stated, will likely want to purchase another lens or two to better fit certain situations. After pouring through the web, the deal at Costco seems to be the best deal, particularly if one wants a GP lens...which she does.
  4. AndrewR New Member

    Posts: 22
    Tukwila, WA
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    I've owned a Canon EOS 40D for a couple years now... got it when Circuit City was going out of business. It was a display model and based on the file numbering I estimate it had around 7,000 shutter actuations on it. In the past two years I've managed to put another 18,000 photos on it and have had zero issues. I LOVE this camera! It came with the EF 28-135mm 1:3.5-5.6 IS lens and I've added a EFS 55-250mm 1:4-5.6 IS and a 15+ year old 19-35mm from a Canon film SLR. The 28-135 is a good compromise lens but I find that I tend towards the long lens for the shots I like to do. Unfortunately, that means I need full daylight with the small aperture/long focal 55-250mm lens.

    What I really like about Canon in general is that all of their cameras have very similar menu selections, interface, etc. I can go between my point-and-shoot A590IS and my 40D without having to change my 'brain'. They both have the same setting structure and the dial on the top is nearly identical.

    My suggestions to support this great line of cameras:
    - Always have a 2nd battery charged and with you even though they stay charged forever. I've only had to recharge my two batteries a half dozen times in two years.
    - Always get Image Stabilization (IS) for any lens longer than ~55mm
    - Keep the 'Sensor Cleaning' feature ON. During post-processing I'll find dust spots in a series of photos that disappear after a power cycle.
    - Don't skimp on filter quality. I was using a couple of cheap circular polarizing filters and found every one of the shots through them was fuzzy. Very noticeable at 250mm and I haven't used them since discovering this fault.
    - Always have your point-and-shoot with you too. I would never take the big camera onto the water.

    The attached photo (big file warning - click on the picture for the larger version) was shot at 125mm on the EF 28-135mm IS lens, re-sized and slightly cropped during post-processing.

    In short, you can't go wrong with the Canon DSLRs. Remember that once you spend some money on a couple lenses, you're 'monetarily stuck' with a company. The nice thing is that the lenses should last a LONG time if treated right.
  5. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,395
    Kitsap Peninsula
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    Bill,
    I'm glad you asked the question. I'm using a point and shoot waterproof and wanting more. Recently I took a few photos of a friend with his fancy cameral while he was fishing. I used my point and shoot skillset. He taught me a bit about angles and lighting and I'd like to learn more. I have another friend that is a true photo geek. With friends that know a lot about these cameras I feel like I could pull off some nice shots. Really wish I had more camera in Yellowstone. My girls each had their own point and shoots, with much better optical zoom. They took great photos. Keep us posted on what you get and how some of the shots look. Ed
  6. Dustin Bise Active Member

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    Take a look at jasons cannon g10 setup mumbles. to me, its a perfect fishing camera. I find an SLR to be a bit much, if I am fishing as well.
  7. Ed Call Mumbling Moderator

    Posts: 17,395
    Kitsap Peninsula
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    Will do Dustin, thanks. Jason has quite the photo gear setup though. If I can put it in a pack I'll carry it!
  8. Grant Richie Member

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    Minam, OR
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  9. freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

    Posts: 3,965
    Edgewood, WA
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    After looking at darn near every option, some several times, we just picked up the deal at Costco -- early x-mas gift for my wife. She's opening the box right now and has a big grin going on :D

    As a couple of you have suggested, I'm sure another specialty lens or two are in the future, but the 18-200 should provide a good versatile base for most situations. Costco's 90 day, no questions asked return policy is a pretty nice bonus...seriously doubt we'd return it, but nice to know she has an extended period to make sure she likes it.

    We'll follow up with some photo's and comments on how things work out. I appreciate everyone's input -- from fishing to cooking to photography, WFF's a one stop shop :cool:
  10. freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

    Posts: 3,965
    Edgewood, WA
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    Just wanted to report back on this camera & lens. The wife really likes it and the quality of images are outstanding. She really notices a huge difference in low light situations and when enlarging -- as compared to her current Panasonic DSLR look-a-like. No real surprise here though simply based on the image sensor size between cameras. Still, you never really know until you make the leap -- and wow there is a BIG difference! She sells images on-line and has lost sales due to the limitations to enlarge shots taken with the Panasonic. This should go a long way in resolving that issue.

    The 18-200mm lens is really versatile and balances the camera well. She is amazed how well she can still capture close-up (macro) images just standing back and using the zoom. That said, we'll likely invest in a macro lens in the not too distant future. Here's a very cropped down image of a shot at a local park -- really does it an injustice as the un-cropped image on her screen saver is as crisp and detailed as can be. Thanks for all the advice leading up to our purchase -- who says WFF is one dimensional :D

    View attachment 45971
  11. veilside180sx Member

    Posts: 295
    Hillsboro, OR
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    The 18-135 is a great walk-around lens. For a cheap non-zoom lens, I really like my 50mm 1.8.

    I have an XSi I'm going to replace with a T2i, so I have the video to augment my Go Pro. If I could afford to replace the XSi with a 60D...I definitely would.

    Your wife will love her new camera.
  12. freestoneangler Not to be confused with Freestone

    Posts: 3,965
    Edgewood, WA
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    The wife loves the new camera...should easily net me a couple of MT trips ;)

    She did quite a bit of closeup pictures with her other camera (Panasonic DSLR look-a-like). While she can still get decent close-ups with the 18-200 lens, she must be about 20"+ from the subject to focus. The Panasonic allowed her to dang near touch the object. We're thinking perhaps another lens for this is in order :hmmm: Any suggestions on a specific make/model lens for this application?

    Thanks
  13. KerryS Ignored Member

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    I have no specific lens to recommend but I will say what you are looking for is a macro lens. Make sure when shopping you look for a lens that is specifically called macro or micro. These lenses can be used for other types of photography but render images with little or no distortion when shotting up close and some will focus when placed just inches away from your subject. Figure out what you want to shoot close up and purchase your lens based on this. If you shoot insects or live subjects where some distance needs to be maintained you will want a fast lens with a long focal length such as 90mm or even more. If you are shooting static objects like mushrooms or small wild flowers for example you might be better off using a shorter focal length lens like 50mm.
  14. veilside180sx Member

    Posts: 295
    Hillsboro, OR
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    Spot on Kerry.

    Most popular primes for macro are the 35, 50, and 85 mm lenses. You can also buy the extender tubes which will help as well.

    Zoom lenses usually don't do well for macro shooting.

  15. zen leecher aka bill w born to work, forced to fish

    Posts: 3,136
    Moses Lake, WA
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    A heads up. I recently bought a digital to replace the Nikon film camera I previously used. The thing about the lenses is the "multiplier" is based off of 35mm and not 50mm like the film cameras. So a 90mm close up lens is the equivalent of a 135mm film lens.

    If your images are 16 Megs in density they should enlarge nicely.
  16. veilside180sx Member

    Posts: 295
    Hillsboro, OR
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    That only applies to an APS-C based sensor, a full frame censor should be the same as a film based camera.