Casting a versatip floater help. ????

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Panhandle, Jul 11, 2006.

  1. Panhandle

    Panhandle Active Member

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    First off I want to say that I'm a beginner with the two hander. I have a 14ft 8 FLI with a windcutter versa tip. I was out yesterday getting instruction with a guy using the skagit system on a type 8 tip. My question is, I was able to cast and feel the load with his set up, but was unable to do so with my floating tip. Where does the floater load at? is it with a little bit of the green body line out, or is somewhere in the belly of the floater/yellow line. and should it be easier to cast a floater? I do have alot of experience casting single hander tips, so I'm real comfortable in that respect. What do you think or know? any advice is greatly appreciated.
     
  2. twohander

    twohander New Member

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    what wt line do u have for your rod?
    how long of a leader are u using with the floater?
    with the wind cutter u want the head out of your tip...sometimes for beginner casters a heavier line is better so they can feel the load of the rod.
     
  3. Panhandle

    Panhandle Active Member

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    Its the 8/9/10- I'm using a amnesia butt, tapered 9ft- 20/15/8 maxima. I was told shortening the belly may help?
     
  4. bconrad

    bconrad Member

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    I'd use a longer leader. For a floating line, the leader should be approximately the length of the rod. This will help you set the anchor without completely lifting the line off of the water. If the line comes off the water, the rod will unload, and you won't be able to complete the forward stroke properly.

    Another thing that really helped me is breaking the cast down into steps. Start with the rod tip right at the water, then the steps are as follows: lift, sweep (always ascending!), secondary lift, forward stroke.

    These steps are most easily understood in the framework of the single spey, but they also apply in the other spey casts. I'm in no way a good spey caster, but this concept added 20-30 feet on to my casts in about 2 days of practice.
     
  5. twohander

    twohander New Member

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    for floating line..u need a longer leader as mentioned.
    if u know antone with a 9/10/11 windcutter u might want to try it out..
    usually if u have the right line you can feel it.
     
  6. pescador do mosca

    pescador do mosca "An under forty victim of fate..arriving too late"

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    I would like to echo the suggestions mentioned...

    I recently attended a class with Simon Gawesworth and his guidance was to use a 15 ft leader for floating line.

    I was out a couple of days ago experimenting with the same line combo on my Sage 8126. The floater feels quite a bit different than the 5ft cheater and 15ft head. Like the other member said, it's just a matter fo finding the right line.

    I have found in my own casting development a tendency to rush my casting stroke. In the beginning it can seem overwhelming with everything going on within the cast -anchor in the right position, d-loop going the right direction etc.... My point is that with tips you have more mass in the water and the rod will load easier and with the floater the mass is different and you may be ripping the anchor out instead of letting it do its job. So slowing down your casting stroke some may allow the anchor to do its job. This was a challenge for me and still is somewhat. Also if the rod you have is a fast rod, you may not it feel load as much as you think it should.

    The WC set up is meant to start with around +/- 6 inches of the green running line outside of the tip of the rod.

    Casting wise, pay attention to your bottom hand- is it coming up? Is your d-loop going 180 degrees to your forward stroke? Do you have a positive high stop? These issues were also ones that I have encountered quite frequently in my continuing development. When your bottom hand comes up it sends the tip of your rod closer to parallel (behind you) and the line into the water creating too much of a good thing-line stick. A fix for this is either grab your other arm's sleeve or hook the thumb of the bottom hand into your wader strap. As for the d-loop issue do your set-up stroke and then right before you get to your forward cast, stop and look to see where your forward cast is going to go. Is it 180 degrees form where your anchor is? Are swinging with your hips or just using your arms? This (just using your arms) can cause an over rotation and sends your d-loop around you on your forward stroke violating the 180 degreee rule and also putting you in danger of hooking yourself. I planted a wooley bugger in my forehead two weeks ago because of this oversight!

    These faults in my casting style brought me to question whether or not my rod was loading and if I had the correct line. But mostly it was my technique and once I got close to getting that down everything started to come in to place.

    All of the advice I mentioned I learned off the new Rio video and during a spey class, these are invaluable experiences and I would recommend them.

    Good luck and Fish on!
     
  7. Red Shed

    Red Shed "junkyard spey"

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    The versi tip part has nothing to do with it. The line is either right for the rod and your style and ability or it is not.

    The proper place for the color change is where ever it works best for you for your given casting style and ability. This will change as you get better. Don't have any preconcieved notions. Experiment with the placement of the color change. What works for any of us may not work at all "for you".

    Also where you hang the color change can change with current speed, wind speed/direstion, or back cast room.

    Your floating line leader should be as long as your rod or a bit more. Good knotless 15' spey leaders are available from Rio, Airflo, and Jim Teeny to name a few.
     
  8. Panhandle

    Panhandle Active Member

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    Thanks Mike, i'll look forward to your present.