Casting Distances: Every Caveman Needs a Chance to Beat His Chest

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Jake L, Jun 30, 2008.

  1. Gary Thompson

    Gary Thompson dirty dog

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    I only cast as far as I can see (my fly).
    In the football field I can do 20 yds easy
    On the water 35 ft, if I'm lucky.
     
  2. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    I've seen that, too, and it is sick and just not right.
     
  3. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    Sorry if I wrote something that made you think that. I have no clue what you can or can't do in casting for distance, and being able to cast 'far' means different things to different folks.

    Being able to cast for distance and being a good fisherperson are mutually exclusive; however, the skills that a person picks up in learning to cast for distance should help all aspects of their casting, which will help in many ways to more effectively and efficiently deliver the fly to the fish.

    Heck, even Tiger Woods practices and even Tiger Woods has a swing coach. If a person wants to improve their casting skills, and more competently deliver the fly to their quarry, IMHO the person should practice and from time to time maybe pick up a casting lesson or two. Again, that's assuming a person wants to improve their casting skills.

    We all have different perspectives on which components of fly fishing are important, if we're content or not content with our skills and knowledge, etc. Improving one's casting skills helps not just in the actual physical aspect, but physchologically, too, as it makes a person more confident with their abilities.

    100' or 85' or 70', those are all great casts with a trout rod.
     
  4. Go Fish

    Go Fish Language, its a virus

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    100' or 85' or 70', those are all great casts with a trout rod.

    As I get older I'm just happy to be able to see those distances.....
    Casting that far for me, not a chance. But I do catch fish.
    David
     
  5. Tim Lockhart

    Tim Lockhart Working late at The Office

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    Not that I'm E.F. Hutton, but...I'd say the long bomb is maybe 5%, at best, of the tools you should have. Kinda like football...you may not use it that often but it can be a huge asset when you need it. Things like how to move about and position yourself w/o spooking fish will serve you much better but that's fodder for a different thread.

    Like many, I won't be winning any distance contests soon but there are ways to 'cheat.' One favorite...no doubt you have an abundance of water at your fingertips. Use it. In stillwater if your target is just beyond reach, "walk" toward it with a series of 3 or 4 casts, each time letting it land and using the water as extra load on the front. So it's like 3 or 4 false casts but you're using the water each time for steroids. Works. Same idea with current in a stream...only now you get even more steroids. Anyhow I think the real value in a drill like this, beyond putting your fly on fish, is getting a better feel for line load (and if you're not careful you'll develop a longer cast).

    Dunno much but seems he who's arm does the work will cast like me :hmmm:...he who's rod does the work will get pretty good at it...and he who's line does the work will inherit the world beyond 80'.
     
  6. Rory McMahon

    Rory McMahon Active Member

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    to me it seems like a lot of people are saying there isn't a lot importance in being able to cast far, at least there they're saying it is perfectly ok if you can't. On a river this may be true, rarely will you need to cast very far. On a lake however, you commonly need a 70-80 foot cast, there are ways around this like just trolling, but to fish the shallows effectively you need a long cast. Think of this scenario, you see a bunch of fish rising in about 2 feet of water on a big shoal. You can only cast 40 feet so you get your boat or float tube 40 feet from the fish and make a cast to them. You will probably get a fish, but i almost guarantee you it is only like 7 inches. You might even be able to catch multiple fish from the spot. The problem is out of the group of fish you were after, all the bigger ones got spooked, leaving only small ones for you to catch. So in my opinion, a long cast is important, but only if you regularly fish stillwater.
     
  7. PT

    PT Physhicist

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    It all depends on how far away the fish are. If they're at 80' I tend to cast about 75'. 60' away I'll normally screw something up and cast about 50'. If they're 100' out I either reposition my boat or wade tits deep and hook my dog on the backcast.:thumb:

    That's how you limit your impact on the resource.
     
  8. reamse

    reamse New Member

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    I grew up with 4 foot wide streams.

    With over growth and high riparian veg I was lucky with 20'.

    But with the 4wt i'll hammer it 40'

    Not how long you cast, but how it hits the water :)
     
  9. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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    I just did my "self-test" for kicks. I can cast 50' quite easily every cast with minimal effort. I could consistently cast 60' with 3 false-casts starting with 25' of line out the rod tip. With effort and generally a single haul, I could hit 70', and with effort and double haul 80' or so (not with 3 false casts tho). I was using my trusty old SAGE RPL 9'....5wt. Most fish are caught under 50' anyway. The long casts are great for sea-runs and salmon tho.
     
  10. Crump

    Crump Member

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    I am with you and g_smolt on this one as well. Recently I started practicing my casting, trying to break down every part of it to become more efficient, and a more accurate and longer caster. It seems when you can put a long cast out there, you have to keep a number of things in line...so when you are in a fishing situation and faced with less than ideal conditions (big indicators and split shot, heavy streamers, wind...) you can still get your flies to the fish, or get your flies to fish that other people can't reach, which is important to me. Think of how nice it would be to throw that indicator rig or lead eyed streamer 70 feet? Maybe it really doesn't matter as much in the trout world, but if you are a bank bound steelhead angler, distance can open up a new world of possibilities.
     
  11. Coach Duff

    Coach Duff Banned or Parked

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    There are fisheries that call for long shots. I've had many a day on Hood Canal and Puget Sound Beaches where I've hooked salmon when others couldn't because I can shoot 100+. The rip isn't always 40 feet out. Popper fishing is another one that comes to mind. The popper can be worked back longer and pull an extra strike or two throughout the day. Steelheading when done with a single hander has places where the long shot is needed to be in the game. Because I can bomb long distance I understand rod and line manipulation in unison and when conditions are windy or I have a big fly and am under-gunned in leader and tippet, or am using big heavy uglies on lighter rods, the ability to shoot long distance makes you better in those areas also. Shooting long casts can also be big tools in float tubing and it is a big asset in Bluewater fly fishing. Bombing 700 grain shooting heads on a 14 weight all day in ripping winds is not only challenging but can be flat dangerous if you can't get that rig cranked up right. Big casters have a huge advantage over anglers who can't in our bonefish fishery here in Hawaii due to high winds, heavy flies and at times long shots are the only way to hook big bones. One aspect ignored is that alot of fly-fishing is in roll cast country. If you know how to shoot big, you can also roll cast big (usually) and that is an invaluable skill and tool for reaching that distant lie with your dry fly with a bunch of brush and low-hangers behind you. Gents, we all know most fish are hooked in close, I'll concede that. Technically, no you don't have to cast big to catch most species of fish on a fly rod. But to say you don't need to work on distance casting is simply saying that you will always be content with being an incomplete angler, and I know most of us didn't start on this quest, this fur and feather "Crusade" to go half assed. Grab a Gator-Aid or single malt or whatever, walk down to the beach, park, or rec center once a week and practice the hauls, shoots and bombs. Better yet, call a fishing buddy, and tell him to tape up the ankles, you want to meet him for a little distance battle of the bands once a week. Ask him how long it's been since someone took his lunch money. (Kidding of course) "Meet me at the park and come ready to take a big "L" because the loser buys the first pitcher of Mac & Jacks." You can work out technical issues together and have some friendly competition and push each other. It's actually fun as hell and you will get better every time out. There's nothing wrong with hitting a double biceps shot once in a while, hell we just quit beating each other with clubs and swords not too many years ago. And remember, chicks dig the long ball! Tight lines boys.:beer1: Coach Duff
     
  12. David Prutsman

    David Prutsman All men are equal before fish

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    iagree

    Best Argument I've heard yet!

    David
     
  13. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    "But to say you don't need to work on distance casting is simply saying that you will always be content with being an incomplete angler,"


    LOL!!

    If you don't tie your own flies...
    If you don't fish with indicators...
    If you don't fish for bones...
    If you don't fish for carp...
    If you don't fish for steelhead...
    If you don't look down on bait fisherman...
    If you don't use this knot...
    If you don't use this line...
    If you don't fish dries..
    If you don't fish the salt...
    If you don't fish a 2 hander...
    If you don't do fishing competitions...
    If you don't smoke stogies when you fish...
    If you don't fish sage rods...
    If you don't take water temperature readings...
    If you don't fish with guides...
    If you don't take casting lessons...
    If you don't focus on distance casting...
    If you don't fish from a boat...
    If you don't agree with coach duff...

    You are just not a complete angler :)

    I think I finally got it, thanks!!

    -Chadk, the half-assed fly fisherman ;)
     
  14. David Loy

    David Loy Senior Moment

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    Or half-vast... (if your glass is half full).
    Half a gud day.
     
  15. Jake L

    Jake L New Member

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    iagree


    And ChadK, I know that there are serious anglers here who are not interested in fishing all the ways you mentioned. But I'm not one of them!!! ptyd
     
  16. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Interest? :hmmm:

    Being "interested" in doing something is still half-assed if you aren't actively pursuing and actually doing it. Talk is cheap :ray1:




    My point is that just because one guys doesn't fish like Coach Duff (or someone else with a heafty opinion of himself), doesn't put him in the category of "incomplete angler".

    We are all anglers with varying interests, passions, goals, etc. They won't all line up. What I like about fly fishing, you may not. How I define fly fishing may not match up with how you define it. How I enjoy it may not be how you enjoy it. How I push myself and grow may not line with your focus and approach.
     
  17. Jake L

    Jake L New Member

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    I'll concede that not everyone has to fish everything in every way. But that person is merely being satisfied with being incomplete. Whereas the angler who is never satisfied and constantly searching for further ways to fish, is also incomplete because as everyone knows there is ALWAYS one step further.

    In my book, I'd call the "complete angler", the one who is satisfied. Because the unsatisfied one will keep on adding and adding indefinitely and therefore, never be "complete". So I guess, I can agree with you that the complete angler isn't the most diversified. But then again, the definition of "complete" which I just pulled out of my "John Brown Hindparts" isn't something that I would particularly want or strive to be.

    In no way should every angler have to "fish like Coach Duff". I completely agree with you.
    :beer2:
     
  18. Jake L

    Jake L New Member

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    I think its time for the rivers to drop. I just wasted five minutes writing that last response....
     
  19. Tim Lockhart

    Tim Lockhart Working late at The Office

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    Amen. Had big honeyhole plans for today but look at this weather...think I'll pass on elevation till all this water and electricity can sort itself out. Should be active off the tail of this though...:D
     
  20. Coach Duff

    Coach Duff Banned or Parked

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    Big opinion of myself? No Chad, nice try but I'm not taking the bait. In fact the reason I love steeheading and bonefishing so much is that each and every day is a humbling experience and a learning experience. Learning how to cast long is just that - LEARNING. The wins and losses along the way during this learning experiences are humbling, stimulating and feed our brains and bodies. The fact is no one will ever become a complete angler or master this thing we call flyfishing. That is why I love it and why each and every aspect of the sport is fascinating to me. Every day in some way I am a complete beginner and will be for the rest of my life. I lose more days than I win but every day I learn something about the fishery, the environment and myself. At one time I could only cast 5 feet. Over the years after many frustrations, curses, and tail between the legs days I persisted and now can throw a whole fly line on most rods. That doesn't mean I am any better than the next guy or gal. It just means that I understand that fly-fishing is about alot more than catching fish or for that matter casting 100 feet. It's too bad that after 6000 posts that whole concept has escaped you. You'd rather spend your time on a computer constantly trying to goad people into pissing contests that really amount to nothing. Maybe in the next 6000 posts or so, you'll figure things out. Tight lines anyways. The Coach
     

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