Cedar Stones

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Entomology' started by shadowcast, Aug 7, 2013.

  1. shadowcast

    shadowcast Member

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    Just wondered if someone could help me identify these monster (2"+) stonefly nymphs I'm seeing all over the banks of the Cedar. Is one of them Agnetina Capitata? I've tried large double-bead head golden stone nymphs, along with others of slightly different size and colors to no avail. Only thing that works for me are much smaller prince nymphs wth?

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  2. Taxon

    Taxon Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi shadowcast-

    I believe both exuvia to be of Claassenia sabulosa. Perhaps the top one is just more bleached out by the sun than the bottom one.
     
  3. shadowcast

    shadowcast Member

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    Thanks, Taxon!

    BTW--that's a great website.
     
    Taxon likes this.
  4. Teenage Entomologist

    Teenage Entomologist Gotta love the pteronarcys.

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    This is probably my favorite insect. Since I live in Northern California, I have access to hordes of large stoneflies. Claassenia sabulosa, also known as the Summer Stonefly, hatches in my favorite river, the Lower Sacramento. I caught a dozen of mature Summer Stones and hatched them in my aquarium. They only live for a few days as adults, and the males have tiny short wings. The females are the size of male salmonflies, and have normal, long wings. There's a big hatch of them on the Yakima River. But lastly, you can tell there this species by the white W on there forehead.
     

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