Circle of buggers

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by troutpocket, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    Next on my latest tying streak . . .seal buggers. I've done well with these early and late season in the Basin, meaning March and November. Once lakes warm up a bit and bugs get active I tend to fish other patterns.
    IMG_3017.JPG
     
  2. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    Nice ties. I don't fish buggers as much as other guys, with the exception of my beloved white bugger, but I do try to have a good handful of seal buggers tied up. In fact, buggers are not far down my list of things to work on. I've been tying a ton lately.... Went through a flurry of simi seal leeches and various micro leeches last week. Now I'm on a big chironomid kick. Six packs/Olive willies will be next, and then buggers. I've really had the tying bug bad lately.
     
  3. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    And I don't fish them as much as I used to. Smaller and slim profile is what I do more often but just after ice-out and again just before ice-on fish can get aggressive and want the big meal. It's fun when you get the right day.
     
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  4. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    I was out on a lake today, throwing everything but the kitchen sink at some very tight lipped fish. When I reached in for a seal bugger, I discovered I was empty. No bueno. I need to get busy.
     
  5. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    Very nice TP! You're well armed come March.
     
  6. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    You guys are really cheensy with your marabou... I use the entire feather!:D

    WB and leech patterns are my stillwater staple. I probably keep the entire marabou industry alive and well. I was bored this winter and didn't like the idea of fishing for winter steelhead amongst the crowds, so I tied flies. I ran out of fly boxes for WB and leeches and had to buy more... sheesh.

    Those are great patterns. Rock ties the tail for his WBs in a similar fashion and doesn't use the entire blood quill feather tips as do I. Sometimes it can make a difference as to how much marabou you use. On day, Rock was doing better with a black WB than I and I couldn't figure it out. I finally looked at what he was using and it was tied with what I call "sparse" marabou for the tail. So nowadays, I tie them heavy and slim with regards to the marabou tail.

    Those are definitely stillwater go-to patterns!
     
  7. Drifter

    Drifter Active Member

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    First red bead kinda flashy buggers and now a slimmed down natural version. Scottfly is right - looks like you will be well armed for ice off!

    I didn't throw buggers at all last year but there were two times I should of in 6 to 8 ft. flats with the fish spread out with no structure to stop them from roaming. you can bet I wont make the same mistake twice!
    Nick you could send some of that "tying bug" my way - I need to get busy!!!
     
  8. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    When I fish reservoirs in eastern ID and MT I use buggers the same way your are describing - covering the flats when the fish are spread out. It's not as much fun as working a big chironomid or callibaetis hatch but better than sitting at camp!

    Some of those lakes have what seems like acres of 5-8' weedy shoals. It all looks good. Wind drifting and working seal buggers with a hover line is a good way to scout those areas and locate the subtle breaks, channels, and springs that concentrate the fish. I'll be bringing a GPS on my next trip to start marking where I see features I want to come back to.
     
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